17

You could consider a right angle viewfinder. They just clip onto the viewfinder where the little rubber eyepiece goes. Generally they rotate left and right a bit to give you a bit of flexibility in how you position yourself, and you get to physically see through the lens which can be better than using the live view image on a screen. As someone else ...


14

The flip screen, usually called rotating screen is a liability. Even tilting screens are more fragile than a fixed one, so your camera is tougher for the matter. This constraints flexibility of composition but it is usually easier to keep things level when using the viewfinder, even if you have to crouch. There are a few things you can do to help with that: ...


11

I think your best bet would be to use the HDMI output of the camera to connect it directly to the projector. If you have multiple inputs on the projector, you should even be able to switch between showing the camera's screen and the laptop while still having the camera connected to the laptop through USB for tethering. The best case scenario would be if the ...


9

What are some alternatives if you don't have a flip screen in your camera? Practice until you become familiar enough with your camera and lenses to be able to "shoot from the hip" with a reasonable expectation of success. Not every camera that has been used effectively in the past had a way of seeing the exact scene immediately prior to taking the image. ...


8

By feeding the output of the camera to the laptop you can see what the camera is seeing in real time if you can't be behind the camera. You can position the laptop where you can see it's screen, then you can press the remote shutter release at exactly the right moment to capture the shot you are after. Most useful, if, like the photographer in this case, ...


8

It is impossible with Lightroom as the camera is not supported. See the supported list. You will have to find other tethering software and check their requirements one-by-one. As a general rule, if your camera is neither Canon nor Nikon, there are far less chances of being supported by anyone else than the manufacturer. So, check with Sony first, they may ...


8

Yes, it's possible, but not using EOS Utility. There are some software packages out there that can manage multiple cameras at once: Breeze Systems offers products for triggering multiple cameras. digicamControl is free, open source software that can manage multiple cameras. Many radio triggers such as PocketWizards can be used to trigger cameras as well as ...


7

Most tethering softwares that list support for Nikon cameras do not include the D3xxx series. Most of the Dx, Dxx, and some of the D7xxx and D5xxx bodies are at least partially supported. The D3100's firmware or hardware may limit this capability. If all you want to do is view the output of your camera without controlling it, you just need to connect it to ...


7

Absolutely. There is a great dongle+app, offered by TriggerTrap. I purchased it and I'm super happy with it. If I recall correctly, the app is available for iOS and Android. EDIT: Some of the free app's options are as follows: Simple cable release Press and hold Press and lock Timed release Timelapse TimeWarp (time lapse + acceleration) DistnaceLapse (...


7

Compact mirror (as in makeup mirror) can be used for viewing from difficult angles, e.g. close to the ground. You can hold it in place with tape made to be easily removed. Duct tape is not advised, though approved by Possum Lodge.


6

Adobe Lightroom does all of the above (apart from the VirtueMart part, sorry!). Tethering (for Canon, Nikon and Leica) and your first four wishlist items are supported right out of the box. The CSV export feature can be added with Timothy Armes' brilliant LR/Transporter plugin.


6

This is a native software you could use: http://entangle-photo.org/ Edit: And this too: http://www.darktable.org/


5

There is free software that actually comes with your camera that can do this, its called EOS Utility, you can also download it from here. In addition to that you can also use the Tethered shooting option in Lightroom 3


5

There are five possible methods that I can think of: Tethering to a Computer You can connect the camera to a computer via USB. However, this limits movement and can be inconvenient at times. This also requires specialized software. This is the cheapest option by far. You will still need a conection to the internet. An Eye-Fi card The second cheapest ...


5

Due to Intellectual Property constraints, most notebook or laptop computers as well as desktop models do not have an HDMI port that allows video signals to be brought in via the HDMI port. It is an output only port. This prevents someone from being able to connect a DVD or BlueRay player to their computer and copy protected content. In general the only ...


5

There are a couple of methods to get the photos transferred to a computer while shooting: Connect a cable from the camera to the computer to shoot tethered. This requires both a program that has this function and a camera that support the feature. If you use a Canon DSLR the bundled program Canon EOS Utility lets you do this at no additional cost, while ...


4

The EOS Utility, via its Camera Settings/Remote Shooting module will let you Live View your pictures as you shoot them. It will also set you change the image settings (speed, aperture, ISO, etc.) via the PC. No special cable is required, just a regular mini-USB cable, which was supplied with your camera. Note that for focusing purposes you don't really need ...


4

The "Olympic Journey" exhibition at the Royal Opera House this summer had much the same problem, only with the Olympic torch rather than the FA Cup. As far as I can tell they went for your bespoke solution: a simple PHP website where you could enter your unique code and retrieve your photo. The site is still up, at http://theolympicjourneytorchphoto.com. As ...


4

The phrase you want to google for is "tethering" It can be wired or wireless. The cheapest solution is wired, you just plug in a USB cable (if your camera has a USB port, all Canon's do, so I assume Nikons do as well) between the camera and your laptop. Check the CD that came with your camera, there is probably a tethering utility on it. I know there is on ...


4

You could try digiCamControl. One of its advanced features is Live View via computer display. However, the D3100 may not support that feature. The Nikon SDK allows you to capture Live View images as JPGs. So a program could be written to loop, capture and display those JPGS. Someone has written a C# wrapper for the SDK which gives an example of this (...


4

A lot of cameras can be controlled from a computer. Not sure if every camera out there can, but at least in my experience, every camera I used did. I'm sure about DSLRs: all the DSLR cameras from Nikon, Canon and Pentax have such features. I also know for sure that Canon DSLRs are sold with EOS Utility, that allows you to control the camera from your ...


4

The feature you're looking for is known as "tethering." There is a lot of software support for tethered shooting, including Canon's own EOS utility and others.


4

You can control any mix of cameras using software like DSLR Remote Pro Multi-Camera by Breeze System, Smart Shooter by Kuvacode and Xangle by Eric Pare. The ESPER TriggerBox would be suitable for triggering multi-camera setups. Up to 6 cameras can be triggered per box and multiple units can be linked together to trigger larger number of cameras like 3d ...


4

This depends on your camera but the term you are looking for is tethered shooting but not all cameras support this and there are different software for those that do. The cable is generally a Micro-USB to USB cable but that again depends on the camera. Some older models use proprietary cables with USB on one end and a special connector for the camera. ...


4

It seems to me you have an X-Y problem here. The actual issue you're trying to solve is "how can I tell if my product photography is sharp", but you've jumped straight to the solution of "view it on a laptop". It seems to me the best solution here is "get better at telling on your camera if the photo is sharp enough or not". How sharp it needs to be is ...


3

Yes, I'm afraid this does seem to be standard when tethered (i.e. triggering your camera's shutter from a connected computer). However, the good news is that most remote shutter release cables have a "press and lock" feature for use with Bulb mode (or for continuous shooting). You can see this pretty clearly on this Canon remote: Pressing the button once ...


3

I know gPhoto does this (free), i am just not sure if it's available to non linux environments.


3

No free software exists to do this on Nikon cameras in Windows. The only two options I know of that allow live view are Nikon Camera Control Pro 2 and NKRemote by Breeze Systems. They both run between $150-200USD. If you do not want to spend any money, free options exist but they do not offer Live view as far as I have found. If you are really in a bind, ...


3

Your best bet for this is a tablet or smartphone with a camera. That should do what you want. Either Apple iPhone/iPod/iPad or Android should do.


3

This is not supported by Olympus and I know of no third-party software to control the E-PL3. You can see the Live-View display on HDMI which means you can see what its doing but you cannot control the camera to take pictures.


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