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32

I would recommend any of the applications from this list at JPEGclub.org, which develops and maintains software for the Independent JPEG Group. They have a free piece of code called jpegtran which can do some basic transformations (like rotation) without re-encoding the image. Rotating images the "naive" way (rendering to a bitmap, reorienting the bitmap, ...


15

Yes they can, but there are some significant caveats. Although they can be run alone, the plugins were not designed to be used as a standalone application. If you have the folder with the executable file (NOT the plugin file) for a specific Nik suite plugin open on your desktop and drag a jpeg or tiff file and drop it onto the executable file (NOT into a ...


9

You can actually have them come out with proceeding zeros in Lightroom. When you go to export, find the File Naming category. From there, make sure "Rename to" is checked and hit the drop down box. Select the last option "Edit...". A box should come up allowing you to enter a formula for how files are named. For numeric sequences it should look something ...


9

You could use ImageMagick with the rotate option: convert image.jpg -rotate 180 result.jpg You should be able to apply this command to multiple files, depending on your environment.


9

You can use exiftool to remove the orientation tag: exiftool -Orientation= /target/dir/or/File Replace /target/dir/or/File with the files and/or directories you want to process. If run under Unix/Mac, use single quotes to avoid bash interpretation. To suppress the creation of backup files, add -overwrite_original. To recurse into subdirectories, add -r.


8

ExifTool could do this, but the use of negative coordinates might make it a two step procedure depending upon what tags you want to use. XMP gps tags will take negative coordinates, but EXIF gps tags only accept positive numbers and need the directional reference tag to be accurate. First off, there would have to be some changes to CSV. The first row ...


8

On Windows you can do it without any extra software in TWO operations. Select the files you want rotated in file Explorer, right click and do "rotate right" (or left) twice. It will be done losslessly if the image permits (eg, the dimensions are not "funny").


7

You are using Picasa. If you simply type in "Picasa Canon 6D" into Google, you will see that many other users have this problem. Why are you having this problem? Because Picasa does not support the Canon 6D RAW files. What can you do to fix this? Use the Adobe DNG Converter before opening up the files in Picasa. You could use something besides Picasa like ...


7

Here is a modified version of Tomy's Python script. Differences: multiple raw extensions allowed remove jpg only if the pairs are in the same folder (avoid accidental removal of a jpg named like a raw file in an other folder) case insensitive #!/usr/bin/env python # Script: remove_jpg_if_raw_exists.py # # Description: This script looks in all sub ...


6

Here's a Python script that moves JPG files when no corresponding RAW file exists. Useful on Mac OS X! import os import shutil raw_ext = '.CR2' jpg_ext = '.JPG' destination = '/Users/JohnSmith/Desktop/jpgs/' for filename in os.listdir('.'): (shortname, extension) = os.path.splitext(filename) if extension == raw_ext: if os.path.isfile(...


6

Booting into Windows using BootCamp puts you in the Windows OS and that uses the Windows Color System (WCS) to color manage the display. Mac OS uses ColorSync. Both OS's use seperate Display profiles which are calculated and applied in different ways. WCS using CIEcam02 and ColorSync uses the ICC v2 method. So to answer your question...yes and no. Yes ...


5

I've personally been using RawTherapee on my Windows machine for light editing for a while now, and it seems good. Granted it's not Lightroom, but when it comes it basic adjustments without the need for catalogs, presets, virtual copies, etc... its pretty decent and does the job!


5

Lightroom is how I do this. It's fairly easy to drop a picture, or set of pictures, to a location on the map or to synchronize it with a GPS log from your phone or, in my case, watch.


5

You didn't specify an operating system, but for Linux and friends, geeqie can toggle between normal and grayscale display at a keystroke (Shift+G by default).


5

You can use xnview on windows, which has some batch mode processings and also, for a simple rotation of images, have the option to rotate images based on the exif data. Select all the images (even the correctly oriented ones! It will know they are already well oriented), "rotate based on exif" and it will do it (without recalculating the jpg, so with no ...


5

The question is very broad and probably beyond the scope of an answer here. Entire books have been written regarding points 1-5 of your question. It seems that all of that is really just a long preamble to what it seems you may be really asking: Why sRGB images viewed via the Chrome browser do not shift colors when I change the color space on my system to ...


5

As far as sorting files by time, but not date, I know of no file or image manager that has such a feature. However, it is possible to move or rename files into folders based on your desired parameters. The "standard" tool for processing files based on Exif data is exiftool. Normally, I would move files into folders based on the date images were taken: ...


5

but I'd rather import them properly, rather than copy them, to retain the quality. I don't know the answer to the Windows part of this question, but there's a fundamental worry you have here that I want to assure you over. That "import" dialog box you were seeing before doesn't really do any magic. It just launches a program like Lightroom or some other ...


5

The reason is, that the RAW RAF file is not an image per se. It is sensor data. To display it, the data has to be interpreted into an image. This is done by a piece of code and takes a little while. Being interpretation, the result may differ between programs. What you see in Windows is that the explorer or most editors shows you a low-res jpg which is ...


4

JPEGmini. It's $20 for the full version, but you can trial it (as a test of quality) for free. The trial version (or, rather, the unactivated version) has a 20-image-per-day cap — no time bomb, though, so someone with different needs may never have to pay for it. The full version can recompress entire directories at a go. It'll take most large high-quality ...


4

This is now fixed in one of the recent (this week)'s windows updates. Just do a Windows Update, restart your PC as prompted to ensure installation, and try again. You will see that the issue has now gone away. Many people, including me, are reporting this problem. See Window 10 and Nikon D7000 dslr on Microsoft's support forum. It appears to be a problem ...


4

All changes in Adobe Lightroom are temporary until you export them. With that in mind I would use Lightroom and select all and convert to grayscale then work through the images as desired. Once done I'd switch them all back out of greyscale with an undo function.


4

If you don't mind the rest of your UI being in greyscale, you can switch to an all-greyscale display in OS X without any extra software: System Preferences → Accessibility → Display → "Use grayscale" This will obviously prevent a side-by-side comparison of a greyscale and colour image, but you can at least quickly toggle the display mode. Unfortunately I ...


4

Your assumption is mostly correct. The Nik tools have what could most politely be described as an 'awkward' workflow when used without Photoshop and Lightroom. The key difference is that any changes are saved back to the TIFF which you opened, there aren't other save options in most of the plugins (if any). So keep a note of the settings needed to ...


4

Assuming your photos are in JPEG format, I'm quite partial to JPEGCrops, a simple and free tool for lossless batch processing of images. You can crop to specific aspect ratios, and/or rotate.


4

May I suggest the batch mode of Irfanview, which only runs on Windows. Irfanview is also good for simple edits, but it is no GIMP. Once installed, select "File | Batch Conversion/Rename". From there it gets a bit tricky, you need to select all the files, you need to specify a destination folder, and you need to click on the Advanced Button to see Advanced ...


4

This is perhaps not what you want to hear, but you should consider either using one (or very few) catalogs, or organizing the physical files so they are contextually associated with the catalogs. I guess it depends on scale, but catalogs can support 100,000 images easily (I have yet to hear of someone who hit a limit, my own is about 80,000). A key purpose ...


4

The reason was that I am using Windows 10 N, which comes without the MTP driver. One has to install the Microsoft Media Feature Pack, in order to get this driver. Windows Update does not find it automatically. Moreover, for me it did not work out to install this version of the driver which is linked almost everywhere. Instead, I had to install the 1803 ...


3

Windows 7 is definitely capable of using different color profiles for different monitors. Manually setting a color profile (if your calibration software won't do it for you) for a monitor is done through the color management screen in control panel. You need to click on 'Add', then on 'Browse' in the screen that appears and find the created profile for the ...


3

Rawtherapee is powerful, free, and open-source. You can download the full DPP (Digital Photo Professional) from Canon if you have the serial number of your camera. You need to start with the product page of your camera first: http://www.canon-europe.com/support/consumer_products/products/cameras/digital_slr/eos_5d_mark_iii.aspx?type=download&language=...


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