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54

There are at least four reasons. Resolution First, although the same sensor may be used, video generally uses only a portion of it (either by skipping lines or some more sophisticated method). 4K UHD video is the equivalent of about 8 megapixels. Most DSLRs these have three or four times the pixel count, and many have even more. That means it's possible to ...


50

If it was launched at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, there are ten of these Contraves-Goerz Kineto Tracking Mounts spread around the complex. Contraves-Goerz is now a part of the L-3 Brashear company. Multiple cameras are attached and all the cameras on each mount are precisely aimed on parallel optical axes. Other launch facilities use similar, if not ...


36

Short answer: you can obtain some very good results, but only under certain conditions and absolutely not even close to what is shown in the linked video clip. My company, Amped Software, develops image and video processing software for forensic and intelligence applications, so basically we are the real world counterpart of the CSI software. With ...


18

The shutter you hear is a mechanical shutter and it cannot on a DSLR move fast enough to shoot at video speeds which is between 24 and 60 FPS. High-end mechanical shutters usually top at 12 FPS. The shutter used in video and high-speed drive on some cameras is an electronic shutter. There are no moving parts involved and hence no sound. The sensor simply ...


18

Yes, still cameras can do things 4k video can't. I imagine that future cameras will go in the direction of the Canon 1D C, which has still photography and 4k video in the same body. From a photography standpoint, the advantages of shooting stills instead of frame-captured video include: Higher resolution. 4k video is around 8 megapixels, compared to the 16-...


15

It really depends on what you want to do with the camera. After all, there are many great photos that have been taken with older cameras, both when they were the hot new model and when they were no longer on the cutting edge. As with all equipment recommendations it comes down to the question of what do the technical demands of the photos you want to take ...


13

If the result you are looking for is a photograph, the short answer is no. The same equipment won't give better results with video than it can with stills. I think the apparent difference is due to exactly one thing: resolution. Try taking one of your still frames, resampling down so it's 1080 pixels tall, and then comparing. There isn't any inherent low-...


12

Here is a methodology to find it: Prepare a white screen on you computer, for example a white document in GIMP. Take an out-of-focus photo, for example, focus at infinity and the widest aperture to avoid vignetting. Use different settings. Overexpose until the histogram is almost to the right. Underexpose until the histogram is almost to the left. Open the ...


11

Video uses an electronic shutter, rather than the physical shutter used for photo taking, so each individual frame doesn't contribute to the actuation count in a DSLR. However, the mirror and shutter must open at the beginning of live view mode, and close at the end, so technically there is one actuation per time you enter live view.


11

You can't make something out of nothing, you have to have (or guess) some information in order to be able to enhance an image in any way. For example if you know the properties of the blurring function (and there is no image noise) then you can actually unblur a photo. However you rarely know the blur function and noise is always present so that severely ...


11

4K video cameras will not be able to replace still cameras. First, 4K video resolution is only about 9 megapixels. Megapixels aren't everything, but in general more is good, and modern mid-grade to high-end still cameras clearly take advantage of more than that. Second, and more importantly, video cameras are optimized for video, and that has needs which ...


10

Older models like the 30D simply lack the hardware required to continually read from the image sensor. These models cannot support video, except at very low framerates by opening and closing the mechanical shutter continuously. Since the introduction of live view with the 1D mkIII in 2007, Canon DSLRs have been equipped with an electronic shutter and can ...


10

That effect was made famous in Hitchcock's Vertigo. It's called by various names: Hitchcock/Vertigo zoom, dolly zoom, reverse tracking shot. To achieve this effect, the camera zooms in or out, while the dolly (movable platform on rails) moves the camera towards or away from the subject to keep the subject the same size, while the background zooms in or out....


10

I would add two items to Matts answer equipment cost: nature photographers want to have a spare camera, and expect to break things when traveling in rough places. It adds up. lighting: not always an issue in nature photography, but it is easier to set up flash than continuous light. Having said that I expect 4K video to overcome stills as technique of ...


9

I have had a similar experience on my Canon Rebel T2i, the recording just stopped after roughly 5 seconds or so. The reason is SD card. Though some cards say they are "class X", sometimes they don't perform at that, I would suggest following steps 1) First of all format your card once and try again. My guess is this will not help 2) Try video at a very low ...


9

This is a good question and one I've recently wondered about, I found this article to be very informative once you ignore his complaints about 'cheap plastic photography lenses with no focus rings and variable apertures'. Lets assume we're talking about professional lenses here (L lenses etc), his points were Cine lenses have more of a 'oiled' or damped ...


9

Why do high resolution cameras shoot stills at high resolutions, but only typically shoot video at 1080p which is about 2 megapixels? For example I have a Sony-NEX 6 which can shoot stills at 16 megapixels but only 1080p by 1920p video. There are several reasons why most high resolution still cameras that also shoot video don't produce video at the ...


9

The next camera will certainly be better but each moment you wait is a missed opportunity for photography. Improvements are incremental from year to year. Last year's model are almost as good as this year's but they are much better than those 5 years ago. This is on average and there were some years where the performance did not improve or even reduces ...


9

Taking sequences of periodic images, by their very nature of being periodic, is used to show changes in the scene over time. Time slice photographs. In particular, Dan Marker-Moore has created some truly beautiful time slice photos. From his site, A Time Slice is an image that combines series of photos taken from one location over an about of time. Each ...


8

Yes. Digital video cameras use these sensors, usually CCDs but CMOS too. These are the same designs use for still cameras but with less pixels, since even HD footage only needs 2 MP. For HD cameras, the shape of the sensor is often different to match the 16:9 aspect of widescreen footage. The major difference you will encounter are cameras labelled as 3 CCD....


8

Yes it is and there are several ways to do that. The easiest which works with any camera (still or video) is to split the video file into a sequence of stills using software like ffmpeg. Then pass the images to an Exposure Fusion software. While it was not it primary intention, Exposure Fusion works really well to blend images which results in lower noise, ...


7

There are plenty of techniques to distort the size of objects in photographs or cinema that are as old as the hills. The best and most used is forced perspective. The brain is hardwired to make scale conversions based on distance, so if you can place an object close to the camera but conceal it's actual distance then the brain will perceive the object as ...


7

First thing to come in mind is availability. Canon 5D mark II supply was in shortage for quite a while due to the camera's success among videographers. You can't take pictures with a camera you can't get, so good video capabilities reduced its potential by causing excess demand for the new model. Another issue is cost - whether you need the capabilities or ...


7

I have the 60D myself, and haven't experienced this. My first guess would be the write speed of the SD-card. If the card isn't fast enough you can't record video. I can't remember the required speed, but it's in the user manual. Edit: Just checked the manual, and the required speed for 60D is Class 6 SD card (page 171 in the manual).


7

I use ffmpeg for this task. It is a command line program that works well on Windows. A typical command line would look similar to ffmpeg -r 15 -start_number 1234 -i DSC_%d.jpg -s 1280x852 -vcodec libx264 output.mp4 This assumes that your files are named according to the pattern DSC_1234.jpg and that the first file is no. 1234. The framerate is set to ...


7

Data rates, data rates, data rates. A high resolution photo from a 24 megapixel sensor for example is 20 to 30MB in raw or 10MB in high quality jpeg. If you were to store that many frames for video, that would be 240MB to 720MB per second. No SD card can write that fast and the amount of information that would have to be processed by the image processing ...


6

Given the improvements were seeing with the latest cameras from both Nikon and Canon, I'm of the mindset that NO, addition and enhancement of video features is not having a negative impact on still photography capabilities. The sample images from the D800 and 1D X are phenomenal from an ISO and noise standpoint, and other aspects such as color, contrast, etc....


6

Other answers already covered the technical aspects of making things look bigger but there are also other non-photographic tricks: More empty space makes things look bigger, so remove as much stuff/furniture as you can. People judge size by proportions, so getting smaller furniture makes the space look bigger. Brighter places look bigger, so you can add ...


6

If you're not planning on doing much editing, just turning a bunch of photos into a video, you can use Virtualdub. See e.g. this video. For easier editing, there are many video editors out there, but I cannot say for sure which of these that can import an image sequence as a video clip (which is useful). Examples of reasonably priced video editors are Sony ...


6

Yes, it's possible. My Sony A77 and a number of recent Sony DSLR's have a mini version of this. They has a "multi frame noise reduction mode" (MFNR) that takes 6 photos sequentially and combines them. The result on noise reduction in high ISO/low light situations is very significant. Some comparative images here. It's really of most value at ...


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