63

Is there any significant benefit to having an SLR mechanism in a digital camera? Particularly in terms of a benefit that's large enough to make up for the liability of adding a mechanical part into a design where a solid-state alternative is available? Yes. Response speed for both autofocus and shutter release. The mirrorbox has a number of side ...


53

And with a digital camera, you don't need a hinged mirror as you can show the user exactly what light will be captured by just routing the sensor output to an LCD display. This is the reason for the rise in popularity of mirrorless interchangeable lens cameras (MILC). Without the mirror box, the camera can be smaller, lighter, less expensive, etc. Having ...


27

Don't forget a major drawback that EVF's require power to compose, and are much harder on batteries if you spend a lot of time with the screen on. Also, as previously mentioned, because of delays, it is harder to follow moving objects with an EVF.


24

It is somehow true! For a moment, forget about the live view and consider the case of long exposure. While long exposing, the sensor heats up and this will cause the infamous background noise. So in reality sensor over heating can cause the noise and what happens is that in low light, warmed pixels detect light when there is none. (This last sentence is very ...


23

The camera usually keeps the aperture open as wide as possible while framing the shot. It is only closed to the setting you dialed in when the picture is being taken. This allows for a brighter viewfinder and more of the auto focus points to be used. As described in the manual of your camera on page 114, there's a dedicated button to stop down the aperture ...


20

There is more shutter lag because the shutter has to close first before opening again to expose the shot. When you turn on live view, the mirror is raised and the shutter is opened, so the image formed by the sensor can be fed constantly to the LCD. When you take a shot in live view, the shutter closes again to 'reset' the sensor before the actual exposure ...


17

Major reason is that the DSLR lenses are optimized for Phase Detection. Every component of the lens is tailored towards quick movement and stopping the glass in precisely picked moment. Contrast detection on the other hand works best with stepper motors capable of quickly switching directions so that you can move lenses inside back and forth looking for ...


17

Another disadvantage of using the sensor to generate a near real time preview in lieu of an optical viewfinder is the requirement to keep the sensor energized continuously. In addition to the increased battery usage, over extended periods of time this tends to build up heat which, as we all should already know, can affect read noise and thus the signal-to-...


16

Page 44 in your manual! The part you're probably looking for is (quoted from the manual): Rotate the live view switch. The mirror will be raised and the view through the lens will be displayed in the camera monitor. The subject will no longer be visible in the viewfinder. The live view switch is located next to your mode dial and is ...


15

I suspect the major reason this is true for DSLRs is to get the lightning-fast focus times that point-and-shoot cameras don't have. The autofocus mechanism is not actually part of the main CCD/CMOS sensor, but a separate device in the camera body, and the mirror splits the light coming through your lens so that half goes to the viewfinder and half goes to ...


14

I don't have a 7d, but I do have a different DSLR with a fixed screen (not on a swivel). At first I was not a live view believer, but I have come around. Pretty much whenever my camera is on a tripod (e.g. landscape, cityscape, architecture Exposure am in live view these days. It buys me a few things: The magnification option lets me check for very sharp ...


13

Yes, manual focusing is more accurate than phase detect AF (except for the combination of very recent Canon camera + lens). Over at LensRentals blog Roger performed AF tests back in July / August 2012. For almost any combination of camera and lens, manual focus can (given enough time) be better than phase detect AF. Read the whole blog series if you want to ...


12

It's a case of 'read the manual'. Page 54 - D600 manual. Just posting in case any one else ponders this. Exposure Depending on the scene, exposure may differ from that which would be obtained when live view is not used. Metering in live view is adjusted to suit the live view display, producing photographs with exposure close to what is seen ...


11

Video uses an electronic shutter, rather than the physical shutter used for photo taking, so each individual frame doesn't contribute to the actuation count in a DSLR. However, the mirror and shutter must open at the beginning of live view mode, and close at the end, so technically there is one actuation per time you enter live view.


10

It's the whole area in the square. Live view uses something called "contrast detection auto-focus", and that works by moving the lens back and forth until the sampled area exhibits the most contrast. Since blur is by definition low-contrast, this is very effective at finding the correct focus. But, in order to work, it needs an area, first because there's ...


9

Yes, using live view increases the number of shutter actuations and thus potentially decrease the life time of the shutter mechanism. However I would also note that: The shutter can be repaired if and when it breaks, by taking the camera to your local repair shop You are unlikely to reach the limit unless you use your camera a lot You are holding a tool ...


9

Unlike many entry level cameras (which have no way of disabling exposure simulation) the EOS M5 is more of an advanced camera and Canon has provided an option to disable exposure simulation. (see page 69 of your M5 manual) With exposure simulation disabled, viewfinder image will always remain bright no matter what exposure settings are used.


8

An image sensor is basically a small computer chip, and have similar heating characteristics. When transistor gates switch from on to off, or the other way you have small electrical currents in the chip. Everywhere on the chip there is a tiny amount of resistance, and when you have currents going through resistors most of the energy turns into heat. During ...


8

As @cabbey suggests in the comments, different manufacturers handle aperture in Live View in different ways. Most Nikon and Pentax cameras stop down the aperture to the setting selected before entering Live View, and keep it there until the shutter is pressed regardless of the setting being changed whilst in LV. Most Canon and Sony cameras keep the ...


8

I do not own a Nikon D5100 nor have I used one. From my research online, I believe that the Nikon D5100 does not in fact have a feature such as "Live View Exposure Simulation". This is what you are looking for. Unfortunately, this feature is non existent in Nikon's current offerings. It is common for Canon to have this feature though - that is why you are ...


8

In order to use the rear LCD to compose pictures (as opposed to using the optical viewfinder), you must put your camera into "Live View" mode. On the 600D (and all other recent Canon SLRs), this is done by pressing the button marked with a camera icon and a red dot which is just to the right of the viewfinder: It is worth noting that using the rear LCD ...


8

With some image stabiliser lenses this is normal. Just like when you hold the trigger half pressed, the IS keeps running. If the IS motors are audible, the noise will come from the lens continuously.


7

Most tethering softwares that list support for Nikon cameras do not include the D3xxx series. Most of the Dx, Dxx, and some of the D7xxx and D5xxx bodies are at least partially supported. The D3100's firmware or hardware may limit this capability. If all you want to do is view the output of your camera without controlling it, you just need to connect it to ...


7

It actually depends on the camera that you have. You basically have two kinds of "Live Preview", the first using an automatic gain fonction to help you with the framing. It's the most basic one and for this, no matter what exposure setting you choose or modify, the screen will keep showing the same scene. The second type of live preview is called Real time ...


7

The Live View screen will by default try to 'mimic' the exposure you're likely to get with the settings you have dialled in. So in dim light with ISO 100, a fast shutter speed, and a small aperture, you will likely just see a black screen. When you half press the shutter the camera brightens it up while it meters the scene and so you can see what you're ...


7

On the screen at the back of the camera, a preview is constantly shown. I assume this preview is made by light hitting the sensor constantly. So this must require the shutter/aperture to be permanently open. Correct. This puts the sensor into what's called "Live view" mode which is effectively the mode it takes video in. Data is constantly being read from ...


7

It seems like you have mirror lockup enabled. The first full press of the shutter button will cause the mirror to move up (just as it does before taking a normal photo using the viewfinder) but the shutter will not be opened. A second full press of the shutter button will activate the shutter to take the photo. If the shutter is not pressed again for 30 ...


7

Depending on your prescription, you have a couple of options using the viewfinder. One is to shoot while wearing your glasses. The other is too shoot without your glasses. In either case you are probably going to need to adjust your viewfinder's diopter setting. Here's a picture of the diopter adjust wheel for your D90. The trick is to find a comfortable ...


6

In Live View, the mirror is up and the AF collimators do not have view of the scene and can't do any focusing. The EOS Quick Mode flips the mirror down, exposing the scene to the collimators and then flips the mirror back up. There isn't a way for a traditional mirror-equipped DSLR to show live view WHILE using the collimators to focus. The Sony Alpha DSLRs ...


6

Nikon D7000 Movie Mode Settings Explained (video) If you have the Manual movie setting ON, the D7000 only allows changing the shutter-speed between 1/30s and 1/8000s.


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