6

With your comment noting that it works if you enter 999, I suspect that you are suffering the effects of poor user interface design. Sounds like the camera has an actual limit of 999, and UI doesn't inform you of that or limit your input. It's an open Question whether the software's back end is truncating out-of-date "5000" to "5", or whether that's ...


4

The EOS Lens registration data is intended to be used by either: The camera when processing the raw data from the sensor to produce a jpeg image (or to produce a jpeg preview image when the file is being saved as raw data). At a minimum the camera uses the information to do Peripheral Illumination Correction. Some but not all Canon EOS cameras can also ...


3

Do you have any other idea that can help? The easiest method is to take the SD card out of the camera and stick it in the SD slot in your computer, or if you don't have a computer equipped with such a slot, into the SD slot of a memory card reader. Cheap readers cost as little as $5; better ones read faster, work with more kinds of cards, and cost maybe $20....


3

This is a problem I have come across and solved using other usb devices to connect to a virtualbox VM. So hopefully this will solve your problem. The solution is to set the number of CPUs in the virtual machine to only 1. You do this from the Virtual Box Settings for the virtual machine. Power down the Virtual Machine. Then in its settings select 'system' ...


3

The EOS utility can only adjust the focus on your camera when the lens is set to AF (as it needs to use the motors in the lens to move the elements). If your lens is set to AF you should be able to adjust the focus in EOS Utility using this area: Note the arrow buttons in particular, these can be used for adjusting the focus remotely by eye However, as ...


3

First of all, I always recommend a card reader instead of a direct USB connection. It will be faster, you don't need special software, and it doesn't use your battery while downloading. I prefer the current USB 3.0 readers but many options exist. This looks like what you are looking for: GNU Canon Camera Utilities - http://canoncam.sourceforge.net/ I wish ...


2

Jeffrey Friedl's Folder Watch plugin appears to be designed to provide the functionality you want: This plugin attempts to fill deficiencies in Lightroom's built-in Auto-Import facilities, allowing you to auto-import images in place, in a folder or a whole tree of folders. It's likely of most use to those who shoot tethered. It is donationware, with a $0....


2

As A F said, it's possible to use Canon EDSDK and it's Java wrapper - https://github.com/kritzikratzi/edsdk4j/wiki. It works like a charm.


2

Canon has a good Knowledge Base article about connecting a camera to your WiFi network. You should be able to repeat the steps for each camera, making sure each camera has a unique name, Step 2.5. Be sure to select "Auto Setting" for "IP address set" unless you have a unique network topography. You'll also probably want to change the download location ...


2

HAD the same problem but looking through the internet I finally found a workaround. The only thing to do is to do it in the right order! Camera - PC [no connection] Open your camera [let it boot -even if you have Magic Lantern-] Turn it to M [-manual] Insert USB cable to the PC first Insert USB to camera ..it worked for me like a charm


2

It's not really an answer to your question, but then your question seems to be an X→Y question. It seems what you really want is just a way to trigger the shutter on the camera wirelessly? For that, the simplest solution with the fewest limitations would be a wireless radio release with a receiver that plugs into your camera's wired cable release port. ...


2

The 7D should work with EOS Utility v.2.xx. I'm in a Windows 10 environment and my 7D running firmware v.2.0.3 communicates fine with EOS Utility v.2.14.20.0. (listed at Canon support as v.2.14.20a for Windows) which was released in December 2015. The current EOS Utility version for Mac OS X El Capitan 10.11 showing on the 7D support page for Europe is v.2....


1

You can't change the focal length by script because AFAIK there are no DSLR lenses wit an electric zoom, so the camera itself cannot control the zoom. You would need an external rig with a motor to rotate the zoom ring on the lens, and control that motor from the same script that controls the other parameters.


1

In addition to Caleb's answer, maybe your problem is neither the camera, nor the wire. Maybe the problem is your PC and/or USB port. So please try connecting your 6D with another PC. Also you can try to put the SD card in another PC.


1

Get a Canon RC-6 IR remote. They cost less then $25, or you can buy a knockoff for much less. It's only good for line of sight and about 15', but that should work for your situation.


1

You could use a USB Keyboard or mouse to be able to press the button on the MAC from across the room. Not exactly what you wanted, but it would work.


1

When you have the two devices in the same network you can easily use a remote software which can be used to control the whole PC. like for example TeamViewer, Splashtop or any other remote desktop software with an app. Then you can control your MAC with the phone and trigger the camera with the Canon application on the MAC. Another very easy possibility to ...


1

Assuming the lens in question will autofocus when using viewfinder based PDAF autofocus or when using Live View directly on the camera, it should also respond to input from the remote Live View window when shooting tethered. If the Sigma lens you are considering is supposed to autofocus properly when attached to a Canon EOS camera, then it should also ...


1

You don't need any software to download the images from your camera. Just plug it in. Use iPhoto or Lightroom, etc, and they can download directly. You can also launch Image Capture, which is built into your Mac. This app will likely show your camera being attached, and offers the ability for you to define which application launches when it is attached. ...


1

Instead of tethering directly to a single computer, you might have better luck setting each camera to upload images to a web service via Canon Image Gateway. It might not be ideal due to the upload step, but you'll be able to access photos coming from multiple cameras at the same time.


1

I don't have access to Canon's SDK to know what's possible or not, but thought I'd point out you can also use libgphoto to interact with a tethered camera. It allows you to read and write a variety of camera settings. On the 1100D this includes ISO, aperture and shutter speed (and much more) so should be enough. You can even script this using Gphoto2 (which ...


1

There is not a obvious PTP/Mass Storage device option with any of the following Canon cameras I have owned: Rebel XTi, 50D, 5DII, 5DIII, 7D, or 7DII. To the best of my knowledge this is true of all Canon DSLRs. Data exchange follows the PIMA 15740-2000 protocol, but with minor differences. But these differences preclude using the camera as a mass storage ...


1

It is possible. Technically they call it "Tethering Capture" from computer. For example Photoshop Lightroom supports some of EOS cameras for tethering. Please see: http://helpx.adobe.com/lightroom/kb/tethered-camera-support-lightroom-4.html The "EOS Utility software" does also support tethering/remote shooting. From the menu, choose “Camera settings/Remote ...


1

If you disable the WiFi and set the auto Power of to disable it works! You have to reconnect the cable to the camera. This worked for my 750D.


1

My solution was to replace the USB cable which turned out to be faulty.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible