42

Being slightly harsh, competition rules like that show that the organisers don't really understand how modern cameras work. A very high level and simplified view of how a camera makes a image (JPEG): Light hits the sensor. Every pixel on the sensor produces an electrical reading which corresponds to the amount of light hitting it. The camera converts those ...


16

Submissions for these types of contests, and even some news agencies, require photos to be submitted as straight-from-camera JPEG files, not as exports of RAW images. This is usually enough to satisfy the submission requirements. Most of the time, people trying to skirt such rules by faking EXIF data, tend to make a mistake somewhere, that is a tell-tale ...


4

An additional thing to take into account is the code that creates the jpeg has an identifiable signature. The way Photoshop writes the jpeg will be different than the way Corel will write it. Exiftool, for example, has a JPEGDigest tag, which is defined as: an MD5 digest of the JPEG quantization tables is combined with the component sub-sampling values to ...


2

The cameras produce different results because you're using the same raw processing settings for cameras that have different sensors and processing pipelines. To get more similar results, you'll need to tweak the settings to match the camera. Probably the sensor in the D850 is more sensitive, so it looks like it blows out sooner. But shadow detail is ...


2

No idea about this process really, but I just googled it. Adobe's online help says... Upload to Flickr Photos waiting to be published appear in one of two queues: New Photos To Publish or Modified Photos To Republish. Lightroom Classic uploads everything in both queues when you publish a photoset. To publish photos to Flickr, do one of the following: ...


1

There are probably several things going on here all at once that can each contribute to the variability you have noticed. Aperture positions are not exact from one frame to the next, particularly with cameras that use mechanical linkages between the camera body and the lens to set the position of the aperture diaphragm, such as the vast majority of Nikon F-...


1

By looking at the exif data, it's possible to know if the image has been developed in lightroom, or comes straight form the camera as a jpeg. This can also be faked. Now, if you take a picture, then look at the result on the camera LCD, you can check the exposure, histogram, white balance, etc. They you can adjust settings and take another picture. ...


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