5

Many digital cameras now have built-in WiFi but it is usually tied to the application provided which may be upgraded from time to time. What I suggest doing, if you are looking for such a camera is look at these applications and then read the list of compatible cameras. Most such apps are on the Android store which makes them easy to find. For cameras that ...


4

I have a K-3 with both the "FLUCARD PRO 16 GB O-FC1" and a "SanDisk Extreme" Class 10 80MB/s 32 GB. The SanDisk stores images about twice as fast as my FluCard. I've figured this with the following test: Erase the memory cards. Set the K-3 to manual exposure, 1/500th, Motor Drive H (9 shots/s). Hold down the shutter for as long as the camera takes ...


4

Eye-Fi is made specifically for what you want. (not an employee, just a multi-year satisfied customer) Many cameras are compatible. Even some not specifically in the Eye-Fi database. I have a Fuji HS-10. It was not in their database of compatible cameras when I bought the card, but the HS-20 was. I gave it a shot, and it works perfectly. But yes, check the ...


3

If you need to remotely control the power of the 320EX, then you have two choices: Canon's near-infrared wireless system, which would require that you get a 550EX, 580EX, 580EXII, 600EX-RT or ST-E2 to put on the 6D's hotshoe; or you get TTL-capable radio triggers that allow for remote power control through the 6D's hotshoe (e.g., Yongnuo YN-622C triggers). ...


3

It's all covered on pages 258-265 of your 700D Instruction Manual. You may use either the supplied standard A/V cable or an optional HDMI cable for high resolution playback. The only way to do it wirelessly would be to use an Eye-Fi card to transfer the images to another device (pp. 311-13 of the Instruction Manual) as they are shot and then play back the ...


3

Since you asked this question, Nikon has come out with the SB-500, which I have and I love it. Works with CLS, so you already have a trigger. It's very compact and also has a 3-LED video light, which is fairly unique and could come in very handy for video or other uses.


3

All three of the Yongnuo radio triggering systems are incompatible with each other. The "manual" Yongnuo triggers (RF-60x/YN-560-TX), the TTL Yongnuo triggers (N-622/YN-622-TX), and the RT Yongnuo triggers (YN-E3-RT/YNE3-RX) have differing communication protocols, despite all being 2.4 GHz radio triggers. The only way to get them to interoperate is to stack ...


3

If you have the YN565EX version for Nikon, the SL mode allows it to receive signals from a Nikon Master flash using the automated iTTL flash exposure system. S1 & S2 modes are for manually set flash levels. If you have the Canon version, SL mode similarly enables the YN565EX to work as a receiver with Canon's e-TTL automatic flash exposure system. Both ...


3

The trick would be to find a transmitter that could receive the 2.5mm plug from your wired intervalometer. I'm not sure any such commercial product exists. It would probably be cheaper and easier to just buy a commercially available wireless intervalometer that fits your two cameras. Either of the two below would do what you want. https://www.amazon.com/...


3

As far as I know, they all allow disabling. In fact, all the ones I have direct experience with require specifically enabling Bluetooth or WiFi in order to use it. My Nikon D7200 supports WiFi but it's default disabled. Simply enabling the WiFi on the as shipped camera does indeed put it in an open insecure mode, but the Nikon App will allow you to change it ...


3

Buy a used older camera. My primary DSLR is a Nikon D90, which has absolutely no wireless connections. I bought it used a couple of years ago. One is for sale on Kijiji right now less than an hours drive away from me, and you will probably find one if you look.


2

I've reverse-engineered the CannonConnect app to some extent. The G7X is using Upnp 1.0 to find a device that supports imink, which has no information available online but is a fairly simple but a little messy HTTP-based protocol used to transfer images and additionally enable the PTP/IP interface for remote operation over WiFi, and Bluetooth for those ...


2

I am not aware of any formal name for it. I don't believe it is any standard, just something Canon's engineers cooked up. Your best bet is probably to packet monitor the traffic.


2

Dead batteries would. :) (Making it an answer, since it apparently was the answer.)


2

There seems to be some evolution on that point. Eye-Fi seems to be willing to offer CF support, by certifying CF adapters for their SD Eye-fi, starting March 2015. More infos on their website: http://www.eyefi.com/lp/cf You will find a how-to guide and a list of compatible cameras. And also some words on possible drawbacks, like slower transfer times.


2

The Eyefi card can be setup to automatically upload photos to a PC or Mac - if your camera supports the Eyefi card. I use it for wireless tethered shooting with the images going directly into Lightroom. Eyefi does not automatically clean up/delete photos - they will be both on the card and the PC until you delete them. Transmission should happen ...


2

Certain Eye-Fi SD cards can achieve this to a degree. It looks like the Pro X2 cards might be required and you may only be able to transfer one at a time, but that may not matter to you. As noted in the Pro X2 specs: Infrastructure Support: Transfer photos from multiple Mobi Pro cards directly over configured wireless networks without disrupting your ...


2

Maybe somethink like '$ gphoto2 --port=ptpip:192.168.0.1 ...'? http://gphoto.org (libgphoto2 has a ptpip.c file) http://photolifetoys.blogspot.be/2012/08/control-your-camera-with-gphoto2-via.html


2

Note there are also many newer cameras from all major vendors that have WiFi built in (too many to list) or have a specific dongle for WiFi (e.g., the Nikon WU-1a (see this Nikon page). Last I checked the latter did not do automatic uploads, however.


2

You may be interested in this project, http://dslrdashboard.info/. It takes a TPLINK MR3040 (~$30.00, and looks awfully similar to the camranger!) and provides a dd-wrt firmware image that puts some kind of API onto the device that DSLR Dashboard uses. DSLR Dashboard appears to be available as a PC app, as well as IOS and Android. I recently bought a ...


2

Yes, the WMU app is capable of downloading the real NEF files, but it is unwieldy. When you tap "Download" while viewing an individual picture, the app asks you to "Choose the size at which pictures will be saved". Your options are Original, Recommended size and VGA. Take pictures in RAW mode and select Original, and the NEF file will be downloaded to your ...


2

It's not really an answer to your question, but then your question seems to be an X→Y question. It seems what you really want is just a way to trigger the shutter on the camera wirelessly? For that, the simplest solution with the fewest limitations would be a wireless radio release with a receiver that plugs into your camera's wired cable release port. ...


2

E-TTL II is a minor software update for E-TTL. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_EOS_flash_system#E-TTL_II which says: E-TTL II is a software improvement on E-TTL and is now a standard in all EOS cameras introduced with or after the Canon EOS-1D Mark II in 2004. E-TTL II is implemented in the body, not the flash unit, and therefore can use ...


2

It sounds like you're pretty much looking for an internet or Wi-Fi connected security camera. There are a lot of these, although they are generally made for video and photographs would be created by extracting stills.


2

Aside from the X1R, there is the US$25 Flashpoint R2 SPT single-pin transceiver. However, because this is an Adorama exclusive, if you're outside the US, it's not really an option. If you're willing to swap the transmitter, too, you could consider the Yongnuo RF-605 transceivers, which allow for group on/off control, but they don't do remote power control. ...


1

I have two SLR cameras that use the Eye-FI cards. Both use my network wifi and dump the images into the same folder on my computer. I have the keenai software running on my computer. I disabled all the cloud uploading. I did struggle a little bit and couldn't figure out why it wasn't working, but when I rebooted my computer everything worked awesome. I've ...


1

In regards to paragraph 4 where you ask: Can I use my phones wifi and cellular data to upload data as photos are also being transfered? The answer is yes you can with an iPhone 6. Possibly others too. In paragraph 5 you mention concerns of photos at your phone being uploaded to a remote service: This will happen unless you choose to disable the feature ...


1

There is, apparently, a python Eyefi server that you can run on your NAS, which allows you to use an older eyefi card in the way you describe. (The current Mobi cards can only do ad hoc networking). See: http://thijs.elenbaas.net/2013/03/installing-an-eye-fi-server-on-a-synology-nas/


1

In addition to what @inkista suggests, Canon's tiny and cheap 90EX Speedlite can serve as a master flash. On the 6D, I get full fancy wireless (IR) ETTL control of Canon 430EX and Yongnuo YN-465 EX slave flashes.


1

There was an excellent app called Qdslrdashboard. But I do not know how to get it. http://dslrdashboard.info/qdslrdashboard-v0-2-6/ It controls a lot of things from an android smartphone


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