7

Pretty sure it's not possible with the wireless remote. You can set custom function D11 to ON. D11 is the Exposure Delay Mode, which will flip the mirror up then wait a second and then trigger the shutter. With this turned on, your wireless remote will work in remote mode and you'll get a 1 second mirror up delay.


5

Canon make a wifi grip for the 5D Mark II called the WFT-E4 II A, which advertises EOS Utility-based control of cameras over a network. This provides similar functionality with PC/Mac based Canon EOS Utility software. There are similar grips available for the Canon 1D range (1DmkIII onwards), 5DmkIII and 7D. However the wording on the page you linked (and ...


5

There are five possible methods that I can think of: Tethering to a Computer You can connect the camera to a computer via USB. However, this limits movement and can be inconvenient at times. This also requires specialized software. This is the cheapest option by far. You will still need a conection to the internet. An Eye-Fi card The second cheapest ...


5

Many digital cameras now have built-in WiFi but it is usually tied to the application provided which may be upgraded from time to time. What I suggest doing, if you are looking for such a camera is look at these applications and then read the list of compatible cameras. Most such apps are on the Android store which makes them easy to find. For cameras that ...


4

If you want to use i-TTL, the safest options it to go with Nikon. The cheapest Nikon flash available new would be the Nikon SB-700, or the Nikon SB-600 if you can find it used. However, if you don't need i-TTL, you can get away with any cheap flash. For example I have a pair of YN-460 speedlights, dirt cheap compared to the Nikon flashes but can still be ...


4

Perhaps this is not quite what you have in mind, but you could consider taking some video before moving on to still photos. I bought a low-quality digital video camera off eBay for ~10USD. It's about the size of my thumb, and weighs just a few grams. It's a good way to experiment, you can see what kind of views you would get without having to consider how to ...


4

Sounds like you want optical slaves. Use your on camera flash as normal. Put those on the off camera flash and they'll fire when triggered by the main flash. Note - some flash units have this capability built in.


4

EDIT: Ironically, while I wrote this answer, the press release of the first camera to do this was waiting in my inbox :) There is one such camera, it is the Panasonic Lumix GH3. A few WiFi cameras exist without this function but do not despair. Once cameras have WiFi control, such functions can be software driven and do not have to be built into the ...


4

I have a K-3 with both the "FLUCARD PRO 16 GB O-FC1" and a "SanDisk Extreme" Class 10 80MB/s 32 GB. The SanDisk stores images about twice as fast as my FluCard. I've figured this with the following test: Erase the memory cards. Set the K-3 to manual exposure, 1/500th, Motor Drive H (9 shots/s). Hold down the shutter for as long as the camera takes ...


4

Eye-Fi is made specifically for what you want. (not an employee, just a multi-year satisfied customer) Many cameras are compatible. Even some not specifically in the Eye-Fi database. I have a Fuji HS-10. It was not in their database of compatible cameras when I bought the card, but the HS-20 was. I gave it a shot, and it works perfectly. But yes, check the ...


3

Four main options exist: Cameras with built in Wi-Fi Use an Eye-Fi card Tether the camera to a computer that can upload the images Shoot with a camera that also has the ability to upload to Facebook, such as a smartphone camera Eye-Fi can in fact do this. They have a webpage dedicated to the functionality you are interested in here: http://www.eye.fi/...


3

If you have the YN565EX version for Nikon, the SL mode allows it to receive signals from a Nikon Master flash using the automated iTTL flash exposure system. S1 & S2 modes are for manually set flash levels. If you have the Canon version, SL mode similarly enables the YN565EX to work as a receiver with Canon's e-TTL automatic flash exposure system. Both ...


3

Smartphones these days have on average 8 mega pixel sensors, autofocus and other decent camera features, as well as having WiFi built in. I'm sure there are probably apps available that allow precise control of the hardware. If not, consider commissioning one; it's not as expensive as some of the more costly camera accessories and you could sell it to other ...


3

You can get the same result by doing the reverse using a Toshiba FlashAir card because a FlashAir card is a WiFi hotspot. So you can connect the laptop or other network-enabled device such as a phone or tablet to the Flashair. Sorry to hijack the brand you are looking for but I think it will serve your purpose.


3

Since you asked this question, Nikon has come out with the SB-500, which I have and I love it. Works with CLS, so you already have a trigger. It's very compact and also has a 3-LED video light, which is fairly unique and could come in very handy for video or other uses.


3

All three of the Yongnuo radio triggering systems are incompatible with each other. The "manual" Yongnuo triggers (RF-60x/YN-560-TX), the TTL Yongnuo triggers (N-622/YN-622-TX), and the RT Yongnuo triggers (YN-E3-RT/YNE3-RX) have differing communication protocols, despite all being 2.4 GHz radio triggers. The only way to get them to interoperate is to stack ...


3

It's all covered on pages 258-265 of your 700D Instruction Manual. You may use either the supplied standard A/V cable or an optional HDMI cable for high resolution playback. The only way to do it wirelessly would be to use an Eye-Fi card to transfer the images to another device (pp. 311-13 of the Instruction Manual) as they are shot and then play back the ...


3

The trick would be to find a transmitter that could receive the 2.5mm plug from your wired intervalometer. I'm not sure any such commercial product exists. It would probably be cheaper and easier to just buy a commercially available wireless intervalometer that fits your two cameras. Either of the two below would do what you want. https://www.amazon.com/...


2

There seems to be some evolution on that point. Eye-Fi seems to be willing to offer CF support, by certifying CF adapters for their SD Eye-fi, starting March 2015. More infos on their website: http://www.eyefi.com/lp/cf You will find a how-to guide and a list of compatible cameras. And also some words on possible drawbacks, like slower transfer times.


2

I have been meaning to buy one of these: http://www.gadgetinfinity.com/cactus-af50-i-ttl-camera-flash-speedlite-for-nikon.html.


2

I am not aware of any formal name for it. I don't believe it is any standard, just something Canon's engineers cooked up. Your best bet is probably to packet monitor the traffic.


2

Dead batteries would. :) (Making it an answer, since it apparently was the answer.)


2

If you need to remotely control the power of the 320EX, then you have two choices: Canon's near-infrared wireless system, which would require that you get a 550EX, 580EX, 580EXII, 600EX-RT or ST-E2 to put on the 6D's hotshoe; or you get TTL-capable radio triggers that allow for remote power control through the 6D's hotshoe (e.g., Yongnuo YN-622C triggers). ...


2

You may be interested in this project, http://dslrdashboard.info/. It takes a TPLINK MR3040 (~$30.00, and looks awfully similar to the camranger!) and provides a dd-wrt firmware image that puts some kind of API onto the device that DSLR Dashboard uses. DSLR Dashboard appears to be available as a PC app, as well as IOS and Android. I recently bought a ...


2

Note there are also many newer cameras from all major vendors that have WiFi built in (too many to list) or have a specific dongle for WiFi (e.g., the Nikon WU-1a (see this Nikon page). Last I checked the latter did not do automatic uploads, however.


2

Maybe somethink like '$ gphoto2 --port=ptpip:192.168.0.1 ...'? http://gphoto.org (libgphoto2 has a ptpip.c file) http://photolifetoys.blogspot.be/2012/08/control-your-camera-with-gphoto2-via.html


2

Certain Eye-Fi SD cards can achieve this to a degree. It looks like the Pro X2 cards might be required and you may only be able to transfer one at a time, but that may not matter to you. As noted in the Pro X2 specs: Infrastructure Support: Transfer photos from multiple Mobi Pro cards directly over configured wireless networks without disrupting your ...


2

The Eyefi card can be setup to automatically upload photos to a PC or Mac - if your camera supports the Eyefi card. I use it for wireless tethered shooting with the images going directly into Lightroom. Eyefi does not automatically clean up/delete photos - they will be both on the card and the PC until you delete them. Transmission should happen ...


2

Yes, the WMU app is capable of downloading the real NEF files, but it is unwieldy. When you tap "Download" while viewing an individual picture, the app asks you to "Choose the size at which pictures will be saved". Your options are Original, Recommended size and VGA. Take pictures in RAW mode and select Original, and the NEF file will be downloaded to your ...


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