Hot answers tagged

15

Sadly, the feature's name is misleading. In fact, I'd go so far as to say that it's wrong, if not an outright lie. Turning this option on just enables you to use exposure compensation — it doesn't let you do anything actually "manual". If you enable this option, the ... menu at the lower right of the screen gains a +/- icon, as typically indicates exposure ...


13

While Google created an API in Android Lollipop that exposes RAW images from the camera, Android leaves it up the each phone manufacturer as to whether they will make the camera RAW available to the user. Therefore, to gain access to RAW images, you need the phone manufacturer to enable it, and software to take advantage of it. And yes, it is possible for a ...


8

This is something specific to photographing LEDs. Most LEDs aren't on all the time, but are in fact flashing extremely rapidly. The ratio of on/off time (the duty cycle) can be used to control the perceived brightness of the LED. The camera you are using has a rolling shutter. When your camera takes a photo, it actually scans the image from top to bottom (or ...


7

Absolutely. There is a great dongle+app, offered by TriggerTrap. I purchased it and I'm super happy with it. If I recall correctly, the app is available for iOS and Android. EDIT: Some of the free app's options are as follows: Simple cable release Press and hold Press and lock Timed release Timelapse TimeWarp (time lapse + acceleration) DistnaceLapse (...


6

The way I would do it: Install BitTorrent Sync to your phone Install same software to your PC. Setup syncing (not backup) between your phone's camera photo folder and PC. In Lightroom's import dialog, select "Move" instead of default "Copy". The special thing with BitTorrent Sync compared to Dropbox/Google+ Photos is that a) it syncs directly between your ...


6

I think you're under a misconception here. There's no evidence that the Android phone is doing anything but picking a middle exposure. The scene has a lot of dynamic range — it's a big difference between the shadows and the sky, but the camera is doing a great job keeping both (as you say, it looks like it activated the auto-HDR in camera). Lightroom is ...


5

The process of connecting your (in this case Android) phone to your 70D involves multiple steps. First you have to enable wifi (you do this in the menu) on the 70D (the same applies to the 6D) and this brings up the wifi function menu option. When you select the wifi function you will be prompted to register a nickname for the camera. After doing that you'll ...


5

It seems that there is no way to create a tracklog from within Lightroom. I just did a Google search on that and looked in Lightroom 4 for options. You can create a tracklog from your geotagged pictures using exiftools. Save the following print configuration to a file named gpx.fmt in your working directory. #------------------------------------------------...


5

No, there is no way. This just isn't possible. There's no unalterable data that you can check. Why are people sending you false information? I'd work on checking your incentives, and make it easy to identify patterns of false reports.


5

The last time Camera FV-5 was updated was in November 2017. To say it is getting a bit long in the tooth is an understatement. That was only three months after the initial public release of Android 8.0. A lot of reviews for Camera FV-5 are negative and indicate that it causes a wide variety of phones to crash when certain features are accessed. It may be ...


4

The properties of phone cameras vary a lot. With some you can set certain values, with others you can't and just shoot in an "auto" mode. Just the pixel count and the operating system aren't enough to tell this. There are some Android phones like Oppos N1 where you can set longer exposures up to 8 seconds. With the light painting as the main subject the ...


4

Try a Google search for "how to watermark images android". I found this which seems like what you want: iWatermark for Android Secure and protect your photos. If you are a photographer or artist iWatermark works for you to by adding a visible personal text or graphic watermark. You could also take a look at some more involved options: http://xjaphx....


4

IPhones don't make better photos. They have a decent camera (as far as phone cameras go) but there are other phones with better cameras. There are tons of options for post-processing on both Android, Windows Phone and iOS that are better than the built in camera apps on any of the phones. Adobe even makes a mobile version of "Photoshop" though it's really ...


4

There is no quality loss. The displays are simply different hardware and calibrated differently. Mobile displays often over compensate in the areas you mentioned since they are viewed in poor conditions and also because most people like that, and are not setup for accurate work.


3

Yes, but it would depend on what Android device you have. DslrDashboard claims to support it on some Android devices: To be able to use the application with your USB connected DSLR you will need an Android device that supports the USB host function and an USB OTG adapter that you can buy cheap on internet or build it yourself. The application is free, ...


3

The latest Sony cameras include an Android subsystem used to run apps from the proprietary Sony PlayMemories Camera App Store (PMCA). We reverse engineered the installation process. This allows you to install custom Android apps on your camera. https://github.com/ma1co/Sony-PMCA-RE


3

Do smartphone cameras generally expose to the right? That's not something you can generalize because there are lots of smartphones out there with lots of different sensors in them that behave differently. Yours in particular appears to do that, probably because the manufacturer determined that doing so gets the best performance out of the sensor. In ...


3

Most such apps I've found for Android are fairly poor in quality. The best I've found so far is Bimostitch. It has a bunch of settings and I believe you can change the projection mode (ie, from spherical to cylindrical to a flat projection). Note: the panorama features in the camera app on recent Samsung devices is pretty good too, though it only works in ...


3

Now, my question is why most camera apps use a limited set of shutter speed values instead of a continuous value. Using discrete values rather than a continuous range makes it easier for photographers to select the right value, predict the result, and reproduce any given setting. The usual range of speeds provides enough granularity to achieve any exposure ...


3

As a non-Nikon user (a Canon user), I see two options: Select the P mode. It's reasonably similar to the full auto mode. You may need to pop up the flash manually if you have a camera with an integrated flash and wish to use it. You don't need to adjust the settings of the P mode at all, because it does everything apart from popping up the flash ...


2

You can use an Eyefi sd card in your camera so as the card sends the files to your android device, the Eyefi app will add the GPS info to the EXIF data. Totally automated.


2

Please check out the cam ranger, works great on my d7000 and d600


2

If you had the D7100 the answer would be yes via the Nikon Wireless Mobile Utility. Instead you could use something third party such as: Trigger Happy


2

I know this answer is some years late, but I was so tired of fighting to connect mine that I bought one of these They come in a USB-C version as well. Just plug into your mobile device and plug your camera's cable in and you're all set. Now everything works beautifully without fear of random disconnection. It also works great with the DSLR Controller app (...


2

There is a portal, where you can select it as ILCE-7(R). It shows some 20 apps, and one of them (E 9,99) does time lapses. It is possible to develop in-cam apps too but I can't find a link so quickly. Maybe that requires an account first.


2

That depends almost entirely on the hardware. Android has had raw support in the software since Eclair (2.0, API level 5), but it was always left to a manufacturer-specific format if the hardware could provide anything that could be called raw. Most of the mobile chipsets in circulation run the camera entirely in silicon and burp out JPEGs, and that's been ...


2

You can use an USB hub on your tablet, I have a similar setup with my (rooted) Nexus 7 to read different USB key and it works. However, you may have power issues if you are using a hard drive. The power output of your tablet is probably about 500mA. Check the consumption of your HDD. If it's higher or close to 500mA, you will have to use some external power ...


2

There are smartphone-camera hybrids like Panasonic's CM1 or Samsung's Galaxy Camera. They have android OS running, so I think if you got wifi connection you could probably upload your photos. However, if you already got a smartphone and a DSLR but without wifi, you may want to look into wifi cards. With those cards you can add wifi functionality to your ...


2

Motion blur? How to reproduce that? On a retouching software you go to... Effects > Motion blur... Normally you need to work in a specific layer. If you are refering to a photo you simply use a slow shutter speed. How low? depends on how fast the object is moving, how close you are to that subject so what is the relative distance you need on the framing to ...


2

This effect is a simple motion blur. You recreate it with using a slow shutter, low ISO, low light and a steady hand or a tripod. The person just moves the body part. Try this simulator out. On the running dog image, check "Link" then move the shutter slide to the left. Longer exposure makes moving objects blurred. To recreate this on your smartphone, you ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible