38

It's worth noting that sensor size plays a huge role in depth of field and behavior of the lens. A smartphone has a tiny camera sensor, often around 25 square mm. This gives the camera a crop factor of about 6. (For the Samsung S9, I'm not sure about the dimensions.) You can calculate the hyperfocal distance (or "depth of field") but you can also get a ...


29

The overall difference in typical image quality between a current smartphone like the Huawei P30 Pro and an older DSLR like the Canon EOS Rebel T1i/500D isn't the difference between the sensors. The difference is about who makes the decisions when shooting and, more importantly, in post processing about how both are done. Recent smartphones have gotten very ...


28

I would suggest that it might actually be a sensor fault (or firmware bug). My reason for suspecting this rather than JPEG artefacts or banding is that the surrounding sky has exactly the same gradient but is rendered correctly. Also, JPEG artefacts would tend to be noticed in areas of higher detail, but those look great. If this only tend to happen in ...


27

No, your camera sensor is not bigger than your smartphone sensor, they are both about 1/2,5". The difference is that your Canon camera uses ancient sensor technology (more noise), smaller aperture (less light) and no sophisticated image processing, so no wonder it will produce inferior images in nearly all conditions, except when zooming in, thanks to its ...


26

You could get a really fast 50mm f/1.4 [or cheaper 1.8] lens for $£€ 200 second-hand that will make those fabulous blurry background photos that smartphones can now fake quite well, in low light too. You couldn't, however, get a smartphone with that capability for much under $£€ 1,000. Additionally... ..if you got bored of the nifty fifty you could sell it ...


26

As with many things, the end quality depends on the weakest link. Because most cameras are quite good, even cheap ones (even from mobile phones), the weakest link is mostly the person behind the camera. When learning some theory and practice, photographers can work around some pitfalls of cameras, but also knowing the shortcomings of a camera. When that ...


22

These look like JPEG compression artifacts, possibly caused by picking a lower-quality setting in the camera settings. On many cameras there's e.g. a Fine JPEG mode and a SuperFine mode, or something similar to that. Select the higher-quality option, or better yet, shoot RAW...


22

The primary reasons for the differences in image quality between the two cameras are the settings and technique used to capture the image, not sensor technology. To get sharper images, increase ISO, increase shutter speed, and use shorter focal length. Choose appropriate aperture and exposure compensation. Use shutter half-press, and hold steady while ...


20

If by "landscape" you mean something like this: then the answer is simple: at very large distances, depth of field is extremely large even at large apertures. That is, at any aperture if you focus at infinity, objects 20m, 200m, and 2000m from you will be sharp. However, focal length of the lens also influences depth of field, see answers below. Smaller ...


18

DXOmark and DXOmark Mobile scores are not directly comparable, you can only compare camera sensor scores to other cameras, and mobile sensor scores to other mobiles. Therefore your observation that the Huawei scores 112 and the 500D 63, so the Huawei sensor is almost twice as good isn't accurate. I can't find a site which directly compares all photographic ...


17

If you're on a tight budget and want to get the best "bang for the buck" you need to select the phone that has a camera with strengths in the areas you need them the most while letting go of other features or capabilities that won't affect the kinds of photos you wish to create. Which is more important, sensor size or focal length? Image stabilization or ...


15

Gear doesn't matter... until it does. While it is true that better gear won't make you a better photographer, it is equally true that any photographer is limited by the capabilities of the gear being used. It's not just "lesser" types of gear that technically constrain photographers. Even the very best available photographic gear imposes technical limits on ...


14

You should shoot with your phone - best way to get better is to shoot more, which is great if you already enjoy it. But you should get a dedicated camera if you're interested. They work differently than phones and will let you learn about stuff like focal length, white balance, aperture and shutter speed and why they matter. My recommendation - buy, ...


12

I initially assumed that the reason to the skew faces was a result of curvilinear properties of the lens, but JohannesD pointed out in the comments that it could be due to rectilinearity itself since the corners get "stretched". Unfortunately both of these explanations causes skewness but they are different kinds. Without an image as an example I'm ...


12

Yes, it is possible - however, a quick experiment shows that it's a little tricky and that the results aren't as good as what you can from a bigger camera. The bokeh discs are just out of focus lights - so all you have to do is place some lights and "defocus" them. Here's what you do: You need an iPhone 3GS or later, earlier models are not capable of ...


12

While Google created an API in Android Lollipop that exposes RAW images from the camera, Android leaves it up the each phone manufacturer as to whether they will make the camera RAW available to the user. Therefore, to gain access to RAW images, you need the phone manufacturer to enable it, and software to take advantage of it. And yes, it is possible for a ...


12

There are a lot more to image quality than resolution (i.e. number of megapixel). First of the light from the subject has to be gathered to the image sensor. This is done by one or several optical elements that together constitutes the lens. These elements can differ in quality and a low quality lens will not produce a high quality image no matter the ...


11

How does focusing work on mobile phone cameras? Tiny AF motor, in the case of iPhone. Probably the same for other phones with adjustable focus cameras. I've read about the possibility of using liquid lenses and other whizzy technology, but I'm not aware of any devices on the market that use them. Aren't their optics simple enough to not have any moving ...


11

Aperture is only one factor in depth of field. Others are: sensor size and focal length. Large format camera lenses often have max apertures in f/4-f/5 range, yet they yield very shallow DOF - because both photosensitive element is huge and focal length is long (at comparable angle of view to a 35mm camera). Phone cameras have tiny sensors and short focal ...


10

Another possible use of a double-led flash is to fiddle with the light color temperature. There is an implementation in the dual LED flash in the iPhone 5S. The idea is having two sources of light with different color temperatures (say, daylight and a reddish one) and to balance them to have a more natural "fit" with the ambient color temperature when ...


10

This is not only possible, but extremely likely, when you're using a compressed image format such as JPEG. Data compression methods in general become more efficient as the data to be compressed decreases in entropy (try creating zip files of a large page of actual text vs. the same sized page of a single repeated character). The more features or fine ...


10

In my opinion that "flare" is caused by a dirty lens. I'm guessing you attempted to clean it, by using a wipe, but failed to properly clean it, which is why the flare has directionality. Try using a micro fibre cloth. I recently bought some that are designed for use in the kitchen, and it set me back by only a single dollar. I use these for cleaning my ...


10

The best option is to attach the phone to a telescope. E.g. Jupiter with a phone and a 10" Dobsonian. A 10" Dobsonian isn't small, you're attaching the phone to the scope rather than the other way around. Size illustration of 8" and 12" Dobsonians vs. a 180 cm (5 feet 11") adult. Adapted from astroshop.eu. The issue is that the angular resolution of a ...


10

I still have an old XS camera, which is older than yours. Only 10 Mpx, and with an old 50mm 1.8 lens, and I still use it for a quick portrait or as a backup camera. The point, in reality, is where do you want to expand your Photography skills. For me, the way to "upgrade" a camera is off-camera light. I would focus more on how to light a subject rather ...


9

Yes, the technology of your Samsung smartphone is the reason it gave you a better photo than your ancient Canon S5is. The S5is photo is unusable because of motion blur. You got motion blur because of the slow shutter speed which the camera chose because when the light is so low, that was the only parameter it could adjust. The other options were already ...


9

A diopter lens* like this is really only supposed to work at VERY close distances, which your unmodified phone or camera lens won't focus to (otherwise, there is no need to use a diopter). From the picture, it looks like you are holding the camera a two feet or more away from the subject - the phone can likely focus on that just fine without a diopter. Try ...


9

Think about it like automobiles. A racing car or a semi-trailer truck would be awful to use on a grocery shopping trip no matter how 'pro' those automobiles are. But, someone who is in the business of moving goods across the country isn't going to pick the racing car or the family car either. Most of the professional photographers I've met or read about ...


8

Instead of trying to describe it by mere words, I'm posting this to show the size of those bokeh balls. They are quite small, as you can see. Bright ones are made of several overlapping "balls" but some dim ones appear individual. Actually all background blur is made of these circles, but only those created by a point light come up visible. Photo taken with ...


8

Disclosure: I'm the guy behind Cine Meter and Cine Meter II, so take what I say with a grain of salt, grin. Do these apps really work, or are they gimmicks? They really work, within the limits of what the built-in camera allows. They may not be able to measure really dim light, for example. Can they get the same information from a scene that a real ...


8

Megapixels just tell you one thing: the number of individual tiny detectors on the sensor. They do not tell you anything about: the size of the sensor overall the sensitivity and size of each sensor the ability to read from the sensor without introducing noise other technical aspects of the sensor construction (back side illuminated? standard Bayer array or ...


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