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5

I don't have the reputation to comment, so am adding this bit as an answer. In addition to the answer by @Jahaziel (camera position, lighting) - also check out scanning applications like Genius Scan. The app uses your camera, auto-crops, and then bumps the contrast to clearly show a white page and black writing.


5

Suppose you want to dedicate 50gb to photos. (50gb * 1024 mb/gb)/SIZE_OF_PHOTO, for my d7000 I get a result of about 2k photos. The 'easy' way is to just select a chunk of your image library, find the size and then see how many pictures it is. If you want more space used, select more pictures from the library.


4

Lightroom's catalogs are SQlite databases, so it should be possible to create them in other programs.


4

Can I do it on purpose? Can I do it with a real camera? Yes, and yes. People usually try to avoid that effect, called lens flare, but sometimes it adds an interesting creative element. You should never point your camera directly at the sun, but if you frame a shot so that the sun is out of the frame but nearby there's a good chance you'll get some flare. ...


3

You can't change the folder structure so that the Canon EOS 450D, or any other Canon EOS camera for that matter, doesn't use subfolders named 100CANON, 101CANON, 102CANON, etc. inside the DCIM folder to store image files. This is fully compliant with the industry standard outlined by the Design rule for Camera File system. This standard was adopted as the de ...


3

You need a wider field of view, hence you need a wide angle lens. There are a few options available for clip-on / snap-on / screw-on (with adapter) lens kits for mobile phones and tablets (although in reality, most of the "options" available to buy are manufactured by the same company).


2

The Canon EOS Remote app performs a version of this. You do have to capture the image then click either on the preview thumbnail or go into image viewing to actually view the images. They do not appear automatically full screen after an image is shot. It works on both iOS and Andorid, so you can use an iPad or an Android tablet. The app works very well ...


2

One year old article says Tethering to the iPad is a hot topic. Currently, you can’t tether directly to the iPad with a cable, not even with Apple’s iPad Camera Connection Kit. You can, however, tether wirelessly.. Source: TetherTalk


2

I use Lightroom Publish Services (tinker around with the settings for quality and space) to Export the photos to an iPad folder on my hard drive. I then use an app called PhotoSync which you can download on the iPad/iPhone and an app for Windows/Mac. When you have the app open on the iPad then you can select the photos on your PC and transfer them over WiFi. ...


2

I'll precede this question with the caveat that I have no experience with any of the specific tools you mention. Currently Capture Pilot supports iOS 7.0 and greater. It is certainly possible that they could change this to require a newer version of iOS such as 8.0 and its derivatives. I would say that is somewhat unlikely in the nearterm(year or two) but ...


2

Divide the amount of free space on your iPad mini (x) by the size of each RAW image (y). The number of RAW images you can fit on the device (b) is: So if you have 50,000MB of space on your iPad and your RAW files are 12MB, then the number you can fit is 50,000 divided by 12, which is 4,166. However, you'll need to replace 50,000 and 12 with the actual ...


2

This effect is a simple motion blur. You recreate it with using a slow shutter, low ISO, low light and a steady hand or a tripod. The person just moves the body part. Try this simulator out. On the running dog image, check "Link" then move the shutter slide to the left. Longer exposure makes moving objects blurred. To recreate this on your smartphone, you ...


2

Motion blur? How to reproduce that? On a retouching software you go to... Effects > Motion blur... Normally you need to work in a specific layer. If you are refering to a photo you simply use a slow shutter speed. How low? depends on how fast the object is moving, how close you are to that subject so what is the relative distance you need on the framing to ...


2

You're seeing that reflection because the page is not flat and is picking up reflections of the light source. So if you use something to flatten the top of your page down (a weight of some kind), you should mostly eliminate the problem.


2

To obtain an almost scanner-like image with minimal set up I'd locate two lamps either side of the paper. And then while taking the photo, locate the lens of the phone/tablet directly towards the center of the sheet. That is, if you place the sheet of paper flat on a table, the lens must be directly above the center of the page. The wide angle lens in most ...


2

The Fancy Solution: (Hard, Not Free, Fancy) Setup a website for you own and ask the developer (or find some plugin if you're planing to use wordpress (most likely)) to add an option to your website to give the possibility to the client to watch/download only his/her photos from your cloud solution by that specific username/password combination that you ...


2

You can buy a clip-on lens that will provide a wider angle of view, and you can almost certainly buy one that will be wide enough for your needs (I know that some provide a 180° fisheye view, even — you mention that you don't want this effect, but I mention it as an example of extremes.). The typical wide-angle lens one sees in 3-in-1 kits* are about 0.6× ...


1

I cannot answer whether it's possible to change the path on Canon cameras (and I doubt it's possible), but I have some other ideas: To test whether the Apple support's claim is correct, simply do this: Use a PC to move the images from the 100CANON subfolder into the DCIM folder and then see if you can read the images using the iPad. If it still doesn't work,...


1

I have read a bit on the use of the CCK and the only difference I can find on the SD cards from the other cameras is the storage directy path. That shouldn't matter. AFAIK, all Canon EOS cameras (as well as other Canon product lines like PowerShot) use subfolders with names like 100canon. If that caused a problem with the Camera Connection Kit, there'd be a ...


1

You will need to jailbreak your iPad in order to do this. Apple, for whatever reason, doesn't allow anything but importing files into the Photos app, not arbitrarily. That's not the worst thing — the photos will all be there. You'll just have to build your workflow around what Apple has decided, not necessarily devise your own scheme. Once the photos are ...


1

You would need to factor in how much space you would use for other things on the Mini. My 32GB iPad has about 28GB usable, so I'd expect that you would see about 56GB usable. Subtract how much room you need for music, ebooks, apps, etc. I'd guess that you could probably count on 32GB of pictures, maybe as high as 48GB. Look at the SD cards you use, and ...


1

Both of the answers to your questions are outlined in the manual as Andy Blankertz noted. Manuals typically aren't very good at telling you what you can't do, but they are usually good at telling you what functionality was built. In this case, you have to deduce the fact that you can't do exactly what you want with an all in one button, but instead you have ...


1

As far as I can remember, once you open CameraWindow on your iPad, and you have a connection to your camera, you can see the thumbnails which you can individually select by tapping them and then tap the save button. Perhaps this wikihow article might help


1

Lightroom uses, or can use and generate, XMP Sidecar files there are a number of free &/or open source applications that can do the same: ExifTool by Phil Harvey, open source Perl module or command line. Can read/write XMP, supports custom XMP schema (platform independent) Exiv2 - Open Source C++ library and command line utility to manage image metadata,...


1

You would have to copy them off your iPad and onto a computer. The iPad won't function as a "camera" for this purpose and it won't attach as an external drive. However, once copied off the iPad, you can just import the files into Capture One normally. Caveat, I don't use Capture One, so I'm not thoroughly familiar with their import functions. I do know that ...


1

I don't know for sure if you can access the SD card through the USB connection to the camera for this particular model, but on most systems that is possible. It is, however, often slower than using a dedicated reader since the camera is not purpose built to be an SD card reader. It can also be very convenient to have a card reader if you get to the point ...


1

Looks like the best bet might be something like this: http://www.camranger.com Seems to allow remote access and deletion of files. Not sure of the speed or stability though, and fairly expensive.


1

16 GB is enough for a very large number of low megapixel JPEG images (probably over ten thousand), however there are a lot of other factors involved, such as how else you will use the iPad and how much space that will consume. There is also the question of security of the backup as an iPad is an even higher theft risk than the iPhone. Why not simply get an ...


1

I don't think you can fill 16GB at all with iPhone JPEGs even in a whole year of shooting like crazy, but you are better off doing some simple maths: take a look at the average size of your files (I assume than the iPhone totally sucks giving the user such information, so you would have to copy the files to a proper PC), make an estimation of how many ...


1

Check out Mosaic View. Mosaic View provides cloud access to your entire Lightroom catalog on your iPad including your collections. Mosaic View doesn't have two way sync to modify your Collections information yet but they are adding this in the fall. Until then this is your best bet to automatically access your collections.


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