19

First I'd like to address the other comments. They are correct if you present yourself as a professional photographer. While it may sound "snooty," it's true that you can't properly do a wedding unless you have some serious glass. You should have a collection that gives you 17mm-200mm and f/2.8 along that entire range. Prime is always better, but a 17-55 ...


18

You can run the camera directly off AC power with two pieces of gear. You need a camera-specific "dongle" that basically fakes being the battery in the battery compartment. This then connects to the other part you need, which is the AC-to-DC adapter. For the D3100, you need the Nikon EP-5A power supply connector and the Nikon EH-5b AC adapter. According ...


13

The question here doesn't — or shouldn't — come down to what we prefer, but rather what you want to use it for. These lenses (because of their different focal length) have a significantly different angle of view, which means that they serve different purposes. Eventually, you may find that you want both. On your APS-C Nikon, the 50mm lens acts as a short ...


13

What you are going wrong is not giving the camera enough latitude. You fixed the aperture and ISO, so all the camera can do is set the shutter-speed and flash power. It must be not as low-light as you think because most often you would get an under-exposed image doing what you are doing. The camera has a shutter-speed range it can use with the flash. The ...


10

I prefer the 35mm. I actually have the d3100 and upgraded to the nikkor 35mm f/1.8 a few months ago. I will get the 50mm however, but use it only for portraiture (not the best, but still cheap, fast and compact). As an exercise try to shoot all day at 35mm with your kit lens. And then 50mm. You will know for sure what you need.


9

Has anyone had this problem with the Albinar lens? There are two versions of the Albinar 500mm f8. One is a fixed aperture mirror lens and one is a variable aperture "Preset" lens. Which version do you have? They are both actually made by Samyang and also sold under many other names. (Opteka, Bower, Kalimar, Phoenix, Rokinon, Quantaray, Vivitar, Bell &...


8

The main issue with most wedding photography is the lack of available light. While some scenes may look bright, you will find there isn't enough light. For example, churches tend to be "dark." Assuming flash is not permitted during the ceremony, the 18-200mm lens likely won't pull in enough light to give you a great exposure. You will find most of your ...


8

Using the dpReview lens widget it appears the AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR is sharpest at f/8 for most focal lengths. There are some points in the zoom range that center sharpness is better at f/5.6 but usually at a much greater expense to edge sharpness. At DxO Mark, the results for the AF-S DX Nikkor 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR are similar to those at ...


8

Unfortunately not, as this lens does not have a built-in AF motor, and neither do the D3X00 or D5X00 camera families from Nikon. Your camera will only have autofocus with Nikon lenses marked AF-S, or compatible lenses from other makers that include built-in focusing motors.


8

Unfortunately, that photo is much too far gone for any software to be able to clean it up. One of the big advantages of digital over film is the ability to instantly review photos - get in the habit of using it.


7

Most tethering softwares that list support for Nikon cameras do not include the D3xxx series. Most of the Dx, Dxx, and some of the D7xxx and D5xxx bodies are at least partially supported. The D3100's firmware or hardware may limit this capability. If all you want to do is view the output of your camera without controlling it, you just need to connect it to ...


7

If the issues with your current setup are low constrast and looking washed out, then a new lens isn't going to help. A polarizer will help in some cases when there is some blue sky in the picture or a rainbow, but otherwise it won't make much difference either. What will matter is post processing. Clouds are all quite bright, even the "dark" ones. The ...


6

I don't have a D3100, but everything I can find says that the electronic rangefinder is a manual focus aid. When the camera is in manual focus mode and you turn on the rangefinder, the exposure meter will indicate which way to turn the lens to focus. So you could turn it on when you want some help focusing manually.


6

Consider this half an answer or an answer to half your question :) Most cameras on the market use custom batteries. This allows the camera manufacturer to provide a precise and reliable experience for the user. The downside is increased cost and inconvenience since options are limited. AA batteries are great and Pentax still makes DSLRs that use AAs and ...


6

Despite the D90 being a full two years older than the D3100 I think it still holds up against the newer model. The D90 does exposure and white balance bracketing, not achievable with the D3100. Also the screen on the D90 is superior, with 920,000 dot resolution vs the 230,000 of the D3100. One area the D90 falls down is in video - if you want to use ...


6

Is Autofocus working at all? Obvious question first. Is the lens attempting to focus at all? If you switch the lens to manual focus, move the focus to infinity (or to closest focus), then switch back to autofocus and point at something and half-press, does the lens attempt to focus? Need to know if it's "hunting", or just not moving at all. Autofocus ...


6

You have almost certainly set a monochrome "picture control". This is probably showing as an "MC" towards the lower-right of the LCD - if it is, adjust this back to SD ("standard"). (That's for a camera running in English; if you're in a different language, the abbreviations may be different, but the principle remains the same).


6

The primary problem here is simply one of exposure. The camera's metering system is not really smart — it doesn't know the difference between a white blanket that's dimly lit and a gray blanket that's brightly lit. It just assumes that everything is somewhere in the middle. Your scene contains a lot of white. This fools the camera's assumption about the ...


5

An indirect answer: the type of battery being used makes a difference. Lithium ion batteries are standard because they provide very consistent high performance for both the entirety of the charge and the life of the battery. They will last a long time, are meant to be recharged frequently, and perform well in many conditions. Cost is their downside. If you'...


5

Most SLR's have removable/replaceable focusing screens, and I gather the D3100 is no exception. There are instructions here for removing and cleaning your focusing screen. Be aware the the screens are usually plastic and quite fragile. On the other hand, if you really screw it up, a new one won't set you back all that much.


5

I would say don't bother. It won't appear on your photographs and will only bother you if you focus on it (pardon the pun). if it is really bad then give it a puff with a rocket blower, if that fails then send it to a proper repair shop otherwise I feel you're in danger of causing damage.


5

As you have watched the shutter getting stuck, it seems fair to assume this is indeed a stuck shutter. Take it to a Nikon authorised repair shop: not something you want to tackle yourself really.


5

What you are seeing is called motion blur. Simply stated, it is blur caused by motion during exposure. Horses obviously move and their legs will show even more motion. The solution to this is to use a faster shutter-speed. You can control the shutter-speed in Shutter-Priority mode or in Manual mode. For the former you will get a metered exposure which will ...


4

The manual describes child mode like this: Use for snapshots of children. Clothing and background details are vividly rendered, while skin tones remain soft and natural. So, while it probably affects the exposure program as well, from Nikon's own words the main concern seems to be with color rendering. Whatever effect this might have have on the ...


4

It could be a problem with your memory card. Some cameras allow you to take a picture without a memory card and review it for a short time. Try to see if you can do it and see if the image looks ok. Then try it with your memory card on. If your image looks corrupted then the problem is with the memory card. If not you can atleast rule out the memory card ...


4

For the D3100, which doesn't have an in-built autofocus motor, you'll need an AF-S lens. That rules out the f/1.8 "D" lenses (35, 50 and 85mm), leaving the f/1.4 lenses and the newer f/1.8 "G" lenses. Outdoors you don't need f/1.4, and those are expensive lenses. 35mm is often a good focal length indoors where space is limited, but outdoors 50mm and ...


4

I'd say the goal should be to provide a wide range learning tools. What you're really missing is a fast lens. With the 18-55 and 55-200 you'll really be limited to very 'constructed' shots if you want to shot something that displays good subject isolation - like a classical portrait (subject in focus and background blurred way out). Something like the ...


4

It's completely normal under artificial lighting, when frame rate of your camera matches closely flickering rate of the light source (usually determined by frequency of electrical network). If the electricity frequency is n times higher, there will be n lines on screen. When the frequency matches exactly, dark/bright phases of light flickering will always ...


4

For a beginner I'd say 4 megapixels is neither here nor there. The image quality of both cameras will be remarkably similar, and in fact the biggest differences will be ergonomics and price. You're probably right to trust your instincts and go for the Nikon, maybe spend the $200 you've saved on a 50mm f/1.8 lens and a tripod. Before you do this it's worth ...


4

I really wouldn't call that an upgrade - the D3100 is technically a superior camera - faster processor, higher pixel count, better sensor tech, the only things in the (quite old) D90 are the AF motor and the screen resolution. So assuming you dont want to use older lenses without internal AF drive, then yes, this would be a downgrade. http://en.wikipedia....


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