38

Send it to a data-recovery company. If you're lucky, the only damage is to the internal wiring of the card. A data-recovery company will be able to open up the card, pull out the memory chips, and read them directly using special equipment. If you're not lucky, the bend cracked one or more chips. In that case, you probably won't be able to recover ...


17

Since this is a full sized SD card, it is possible there is a MicroSD card inside the bigger package. If the inner card is not damaged, it may be extracted and read with suitable adapter. Like on this photo: Image source: https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/comments/1hr36f/sd_card_i_bought_whilst_in_vietnam_decides_to/


12

I think scottbb's answer is probably correct - but there's one other possibility that's worth checking, which might give similar symptoms. I have an SD card that wasn't being recognised by some devices. Eventually, I tracked the problem down to the plastic dividers between the contacts. They're pretty thin bits of plastic, and on my card, one of them had ...


7

If you want to get an idea of the probability and cost to recover your data, open up the card enclosure to see what's inside. It should look similar to this: Typically, you have a flash controller chip on top (near the contacts), and memory chips below. The controller doesn't store anything and is typically discarded during recovery even if it still works. ...


6

Photorec is a similar sort of program which can handle the recovery of PEF files according to their list of supported file formats


5

How to recover Testdisk and Photorec are usually good options for recovering files after deleting or formatting. Testdisk is good for accidental deletion. Use the undelete functionality in it to see if the file is still there and can be undeleted. It reads the file tables to see recently deleted files but does not attempt to search for them brute-force. ...


4

What you're seeing is consistent with data corruption in that the preview lo-res jpeg is fine, and that the compressed raw has a number of incorrect or missing bytes causing corruption. The question Why do images get "corrupted"? describes the effect at the file level. Use of a different file format (raw rather than jpeg) will give you different ...


4

The D3100 has a "demo mode" which is mainly there so prospective buyers in shops can snap pictures and review them without having to insert cards. Page 147 of the manual says: Selecting "Enable release" allows the shutter to be released when no memory card is inserted, although no pictures will be recorded (they will however be displayed in the ...


4

Free, open source, cross-platform software PhotoRec can specifically recover many RAW formats, including Sony ARW (as well as Canon CR2, Nikon NEF, Pentax PEF, and others). Although the interface isn't particularly slick, the underlying functionality is the same as any proprietary program, and I'd be surprised if any of the more expensive options can ...


4

PhotoRec always did a good job when I needed it. JPEG and RAW . https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec https://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/PhotoRec_Step_By_Step


3

For the general question of recovering photos from a formatted card, see this question. Personally I have the best results with Photo Rescue. I am not affiliated with that program but when I lost some important photos (more than once sadly), that is the software which gave best results. Some photos will never be recoverable since the data has been ...


3

Any general file recovery tool will do. For image-centric ones, there are also plenty available. The most popular ones are Image Rescue and Photo Rescue. They each offer a free-trial which shows you thumbnails and guarantee that anything that shows a thumbnail will be recovered once you pay. I can vouch that both of these work and I have seen them recover ...


3

I checked with PEF files from my K20D, K-5 and K-3. The former two's files begin with 4D 4D 00 2A ("MM.*"), but the K-3's begin with 49 49 2A 00 ("II*."). Maybe older or newer models use even different codes. I suggest you look or ask for specific PEF files matching your own models first, then use those 4 bytes for header detection. Since they're all using ...


3

That depends on how the used recovery program worked: instead of relying on the file system entries, it could have searched the entire memory card for image data and converted that to files. In that case, it's entirely possible that it "recovered" the thumbnails embedded in your real image files only. If you haven't changed the actual content of your card ...


3

On my iPhone in the Photos app you can revert to the original picture at any time. Select the picture you suspect has been edited, select “Edit”. If the picture has been edited, you will see “Revert” in the lower right corner of the screen. Touch that and it will ask if you want to “Revert to Original”.


2

You can try using chkdsk first to recover partition. I am assuming your card is FAT32 formatted. You can use following command on Windows Command Prompt (cmd): chkdsk g: /f /r /x Please note that you should write your memory card drive name instead of g: After chkdsk is completed and your drive is visible again, you should be able to recover your ...


2

Not necessarily. If the format you are using makes use of compression, then different images of the same resolution can lead to different file sizes depending on how much variation it contains. For example, I've attached is a beautiful 500x500px image I knocked up in MS Paint which I saved in full resolution in both jpeg and bitmap formats. For comparison I ...


2

There are two ways a card (or drive) may be re-formatted "quick" (which simply reallocates the space taken by old files), and complete, in which zeroes are written over all files. If your camera (or PC) did a quick format, it's possible file data may still be on the card, but if a complete erasure and format was performed, it's doubtful anything could be ...


2

According to the manual for your camera it has approximately 43MB of internal storage. This is unlikely to be able to store the number of pictures you took but, if the instructions in the manual are followed, you may be able to retrieve at least some of the missing pictures. Page 24 of the manual states that any images on the internal memory can only ...


2

Unfortunately for you, cameras these days don't come with any form of "internal" memory1 so if you didn't have a memory card in your camera, your photos are lost forever. Sorry about that. Or if they do, it's so limited that it may as well be none.


2

Moving the card between cameras is not likely to cause a problem. I think that's just a red herring. You might try some different recovery tool, but it seems likely that what you've gotten is as good as it's going to get. Time to get another card, and in the future remember to upload to a computer frequently and keep backups.


2

Data recovery programs have most success with data that has not been overwritten. The areas where the data is stored gets marked as free space, but in reality the data is still there until it is overwritten. Since none of the three data recovery programs have managed to restore the data you are hoping to find, this indicates that the data has been ...


2

If we are talking about a catalog, the answer is: Yes and no. Full disclosure: I have no idea if there is a chance when using sessions (never used one) or if there are some highly-specialized programs that might do the trick - at least my Google-Fu did not reveal any ground-breaking program for the job. Also, consider trying some recovery tools - avoid ...


2

If you're working in a session- No. The preview proxies (.cop files) are in fact rendered image files (since they are the previews you see in the Viewer panes. Without source files, the session can't reference anything to process. If you're working in a catalog- Somewhat. Since the source files are gone, the images will be marked Offline. You can, however, ...


2

Since you've tried multiple readers and computers, and since you've tried card recovery software, I'm afraid the most likely thing is that the card went bad and you've lost the photos. If the photos are absolutely precious, you may want to send it in to a data recovery company. These companies can open up the card and read from the flash chips directly. ...


2

In some circumstances, exporting the image will work. The exported image will usually be lower-quality than the original, as this is how smart previews are stored by Lightroom. However, sometimes, the images will not be exportable even with a smart preview. In these situations, you should go find your smart previews. Note: This will only work if you still ...


1

Have you tried copying one of the files, changing the file extension to .jpg (or whatever type of file they were before you had the problem) and seeing if they will then open properly? Some data recovery programs will misidentify what type of file a photo is. For instance, I once had to recover data that had been accidently deleted from a drive. The recovery ...


1

possibly with some software expertise. BMPs use no compression, or very simple RLE compression, so it might be possible to repair the images one by one with some loss of information. Were they converted by you to "bmp" format?


1

The harddrive seems to have problem. And I will recomend you as fast as possible to copy your important files from this drive to other (drive, cloud,...) About corrupted files. From your words seems like recovery software find the filename, find the allocated disk blocks for this file, but information in those blocks is corrupted/missing/unreadable. And you ...


1

I know I am replying to this post late in the game, but it sounds like the card data may still be able to be recovered by a data recovery lab. they would have the expertise to be able to do "surgery" on the card and get to the memory.


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