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32

Photographic workflow applications such as Adobe Lightroom and Apple's Aperture provide this sort of history as a built in part of their functionality. When you edit a RAW file in these, no changes are ever made to the original image. Instead, they are saved as 'instructions' separately. Thus, you can see a history of all changes made, and with a click ...


20

Purposely I avoid to use all of these types of devices while traveling. There are two reasons: They are all based on an internal hard-disk drive which is fragile. One drop and a traditional hard-disk is dead. Having moving parts is what makes it more fragile. In several of models you can get around this by replacing the disk with an SSD which solves this ...


18

I would suggest backing up three things: The original RAW files. Your RAW software's database of adjustments — usually, this is kept as lossless storage of what changes you made. High-quality (100%-quality JPEG or TIFF, depending on subject matter / detail) of developed images you've put a lot of work into. #1 keeps the originals. #2 lets you recreate your ...


16

I'm assuming that the card is just full and you're concerned about the impact of reformatting it and reusing — not that it's failing to the point where the maximum free space is 1% of what it used to be. Don't worry about formatting. The card is meant for reuse, and even cheap SD cards can go through hundreds of write/erase cycles, with higher-end cards ...


12

I've had a couple of purpose-built copy-and-store devices that I bought for the same reasons you describe. One had a hard disk built in and the other burned CDs. They worked, but the better models were (and still are) costly. On the one with the built-in disk, I didn't like the idea that I couldn't pull the drive from the unit, plug it into a PC and ...


8

Extremely important for professionals. Most magazines publish photographs, not excuses. So if your camera gets attacked by a bear, falls into a lake, gets stolen, you still have to be able to bring back photos. Many events are once in a lifetime or occur extremely infrequently, which gives you only one chance to capture them. For amateurs there is ...


8

Virtual Changes I use Lightroom v3 and this product has a non-destructive workflow. This allows me to do changes to my image(s) in a virtual sense. Version Control I then use SVN to maintain control the Lightroom Catalog (Just a simple SQLite DB) and this essentially gives me version control over the virtual changes. Redundancy I have RAID 6 setup that ...


8

The originals were that. The originals. Obviously you tried to keep the negatives in a safe manner because the nitrates and films were very flammable, could being eaten by fungus, decolor, or all kind of things. Even in remastering on movies like Star Wars they went for the original negatives, which were in bad shape. In feature films after the original ...


7

The easy way: Use LR to move them. Add the NAS folder to the folder list Open the local folder in the library view drag the images from the local folder to the NAS folder. Note that this will lose the undo stack! The better way: move them in the OS, then tell LR where you moved them to. Quit LR Do the move as you did, best to move the entire folder ...


7

Professional: Short answer: Are you mad ? !!!!!!! [ :-) ] Longer answer: For a professional lack of a backup body is ~= "death-deferred". You could consider that "being able to access an alternative acceptably quickly at an acceptable cost" is the equivalent to having a backup body, so if you were a studio only photographer and there was a 24/7/365 ...


7

I would scan at the max of 600 dpi - however if the print resolution is so low that printing artifacts are visible at this resolution (e.g. small colored dots), then the result should either be downscaled or a median filter should be applied to eliminate them (or both). Don't go under 300 dpi no matter what or you won't be able to use them to reproduce new ...


7

ImageMagick to the rescue. I think the first step to any solution is to reduce the size of your collection. If you want to compare the photos by its content, especially when some are slightly modified versions of one another, a very good start is to reduce them to thumbnails and then compare the thumbnails. This is particular helpful when you want to find ...


7

If the images actually are duplicates then the additional data is most likely to be metadata which has been added at some point. In other words the files have been modified, although the picture itself has not been touched. Most likely an automated function in your photo viewing/management software has done it. For example facial recognition which is ...


6

Unless weight and size are an over-over-overwhelming consideration then you would be very hard put to find something that beats a small netbook computer. It makes no sense to reject a computer solution absolutely - it should simply be put in the list along with the rest and compete on its own merits. Netbook: Downsides: Weight Size Battery life needs to ...


6

I've tried several of these services - Backblaze, CrashPlan, mozy, carbonite. However, I've recently commited to CrashPlan for several reasons: Cheap monthly fee for unlimited storage. Can backup to more than one destination - I have a fileserver here in my house, so I backup to it and to CrashPlan online storage. VERY useful. you can have your friends ...


6

Never backup just at home. All backup solutions have some chance of failure including the loss, theft, fire, floods and natural disasters. There should be two copies in two different physical locations at all times. So, even if you make the backups at home, be prepared to take one elsewhere. Mine duplicates go in a safe at the bank. For the highest volumes ...


6

The best option, and one which I use myself, is two fold. I've done this for a couple years now, and while at times it is tedious, it is the only way I actually feel safe about my LARGE photography library (~40,000 RAW photos, averaging around 23mb each) as well as my growing library of edited photos, photos sized for web publishing, photos sized for various ...


6

Things that are deliberately not covered in this answer: How to do a back up and discussion of proper disaster recovery procedures such as physical security and keeping multiple copies in multiple locations. Archival as it is the subject of the preservation of tools and platforms not specific files or formats. Optical media of any type (Bluray, DVD or ...


5

In general, if you want to keep your data longer than the 4-5 year average life span of a hard drive, you need at least two copies on two different devices. Ideally, those devices should be in different physical locations. The trick is mostly to have the backups run automatically, so you don't forget it. I recommend Crashplan, it's the simplest and most ...


5

Step 1 - Move the files to the new location. It's important to a) Ensure they no longer exist at the original location, and be preserve their organization (ie. folder structure) on the destination. Step 2 - Start Lightroom. Be sure you are in Library view. If you've moved entire folders... Step 3 - At the left, under Folders, navigate to the top-level ...


5

I'm the bearer of bad news: Despite what other have suggested, the answer to your question is NO. Lightroom (3,4 and 5) does not support Moving images from SD card. See P39 of the Lightroom 5 manual: In the top center of the import window, specify how you want to add the photos to the catalog: Copy as DNG Copies camera raw files to the folder you ...


4

An idea for anyone who doesn't mind a bit of experimenting... 1) get a Raspberry Pi - ~$35 2) Get a powered Usb Hub ~$10 3) Get a Wifi adaptor ~$10 4) Get a portable USB powered HDD (500GB ~$50) 5) Get a CF/SD card reader ~$10 6) Get VNC running on the RasPI and your iPhone/Android. 7) Mash it all together (you'll need to have configured the wifi to ...


4

I think you may want to use git-annex (to manage photos and backups) along with a bup remote (for versionning). I'm currently looking into it myself actually. git-annex keeps track of your files using git, by committing symlinks to your files. The files themselves are not added to the repository. Once your photos are "annexed", if you clone your repository (...


4

The photos you can just leave where they are, as long as the drive letter remains the same between installations (it's possible to change the drive letter of a volume, if necessary, in Disk Management). As for the catalog, the surest way to back it up is to use Lightroom's built-in catalog backup functionality - follow the instructions on this post (Joe ...


4

My personal preference is to keep the most recent backup, the one from the first backup of the current month, and one from the first backup of the current year. So at all times I have 3 backups. Disk space is cheap, and having three backups of my 1GB library isn't a big deal to me. Everything else I trash. You could just keep the most recent backup, but I ...


4

The open source photo viewer / organizer Geeqie has a powerful Find Duplicates Feature. It can use several different strategies for finding duplicates: File name (case sensitive or insensitive) File size File date Image dimensions MD5 checksum. Similar image content (to several thresholds) This gives a results list which can include thumbnails so you can ...


4

Lightroom has three files it depends on: the Lightroom database (.lrcat), the previews database (.lrdata) and the image files themselves. You need to make sure you have backups of the image files themselves, since LR does not create copies of these images, nor does it edit or change the images in any way. If you lose these images, LR can do nothing to ...


4

Well, it might not be the most elegant solution but I did it this way: copied all pictures from every source into a single device, even if they were duplicated for the pictures in the OS X photo app, I just copied them out of there using the console (the photo library is actually a folder) I used Photos Duplicate Cleaner, which I found for free in the app ...


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