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18

I would suggest backing up three things: The original RAW files. Your RAW software's database of adjustments — usually, this is kept as lossless storage of what changes you made. High-quality (100%-quality JPEG or TIFF, depending on subject matter / detail) of developed images you've put a lot of work into. #1 keeps the originals. #2 lets you recreate your ...


16

I'm assuming that the card is just full and you're concerned about the impact of reformatting it and reusing — not that it's failing to the point where the maximum free space is 1% of what it used to be. Don't worry about formatting. The card is meant for reuse, and even cheap SD cards can go through hundreds of write/erase cycles, with higher-end cards ...


8

The originals were that. The originals. Obviously you tried to keep the negatives in a safe manner because the nitrates and films were very flammable, could being eaten by fungus, decolor, or all kind of things. Even in remastering on movies like Star Wars they went for the original negatives, which were in bad shape. In feature films after the original ...


7

If the images actually are duplicates then the additional data is most likely to be metadata which has been added at some point. In other words the files have been modified, although the picture itself has not been touched. Most likely an automated function in your photo viewing/management software has done it. For example facial recognition which is ...


6

Things that are deliberately not covered in this answer: How to do a back up and discussion of proper disaster recovery procedures such as physical security and keeping multiple copies in multiple locations. Archival as it is the subject of the preservation of tools and platforms not specific files or formats. Optical media of any type (Bluray, DVD or ...


5

I'm the bearer of bad news: Despite what other have suggested, the answer to your question is NO. Lightroom (3,4 and 5) does not support Moving images from SD card. See P39 of the Lightroom 5 manual: In the top center of the import window, specify how you want to add the photos to the catalog: Copy as DNG Copies camera raw files to the folder you choose ...


5

Step 1 - Move the files to the new location. It's important to a) Ensure they no longer exist at the original location, and be preserve their organization (ie. folder structure) on the destination. Step 2 - Start Lightroom. Be sure you are in Library view. If you've moved entire folders... Step 3 - At the left, under Folders, navigate to the top-level ...


4

An idea for anyone who doesn't mind a bit of experimenting... 1) get a Raspberry Pi - ~$35 2) Get a powered Usb Hub ~$10 3) Get a Wifi adaptor ~$10 4) Get a portable USB powered HDD (500GB ~$50) 5) Get a CF/SD card reader ~$10 6) Get VNC running on the RasPI and your iPhone/Android. 7) Mash it all together (you'll need to have configured the wifi to ...


4

Well, it might not be the most elegant solution but I did it this way: copied all pictures from every source into a single device, even if they were duplicated for the pictures in the OS X photo app, I just copied them out of there using the console (the photo library is actually a folder) I used Photos Duplicate Cleaner, which I found for free in the app ...


4

Yes, it is a good idea to use the configuration you describe for mirroring/backup. The general algorithm is (unfortunately) in many models single-threaded in its storage part (IOW from step3 onward) and is as follows: The picture is shot and is placed in camera's internal buffer in a queue structure. The storage's subsystem I/O listener checks if the ...


4

Really this has nothing to do with Lightroom or Photography. The solution is the same regardless of which type of files you need to back incrementally: rsync This a utility to synchronize file-systems by only copy differences. It can do quite a lot actually as there are dozens of options. I use it on Linux as part of my backup procedure. A simple command ...


4

It seems like it's harder to find photo backup devices these days than it used to be, perhaps because large memory cards are relatively cheap and pro-level cameras can often use two cards at a time, automatically creating a very small, very portable backup. In any case, there are still some devices available; to find them, search for memory card backup ...


4

The Lightroom catalog backup does multiple things, generally: does an integrity check on the catalog (why back up something if it is corrupt), copies the file, and optimizes the running copy for better performance. I am fairly sure during the optimization that it does a cleanup of (some? all?) preview files. And finally it zips the catalog's backup to ...


4

While this may be a convent transfer mechanism (assuming the app does have the feature of sending unmodified originals without recompressing or downsizing), it is not a backup. Even if Telegram happens to provide adequate storage and no time limits today, there is no guarantee that they will tomorrow, or for the rest of the trip. They could literally decide ...


3

To restore only files with lost modifications: Open your gallery backup in Lightroom Select those photos and choose File->Export as Catalog. You could also save metadata to files, but that does not include all data (for example, flags are not included, while color labels and stars are). Open your original catalog again Delete files you just exported (only ...


3

My suggestions are to keep: RAW images, untouched. Its always wise to have the original so you can start working again on it. RAW adjustments. For example Lightroom keep them in xmp files so you will not loose your work on the image. And eventually high quality end product, but only in case you do some destructive changes, compared to the RAW I ...


3

Get yourself a Wolverine backup. You do not need a computer to transfer your images, you get backup in various capacities, its battery powered and is very light compared to a notebook. Nikon also has one called Nikon CoolWalker but I believe it is discontinued now. You can still get used ones but the reviews are not great.


3

I want to know is there an elegant way which does not cost a bomb? One possible cost effective method to increase the number of images you can take and preserve during your travel would be to buy more SD cards. To back them up you can use a relatively cheap SD card duplicator such as this portable, battery powered one. Rather than one very large card, buy ...


3

My suggestion would be a combo of a second hand android phone with OTG cable. Three main reasons, why an android phone is better than a Raspberry Pi in your case? A second hand android phone could cost you cheaper than a Raspberry Pi Model 3. A phone is thinner and lighter and can be carried out easily than a Pi with case and screen. Apart from Wi-Fi, you ...


2

This may be helpful although I already posted this as reply to another question: Google Photos (google.com/photos) offers 15GB free space for "Original quality" uncompressed photos. If you need more space you can always upgrade to a paid plan. Google One offers huge storage capacities for a relatively fair price (one.google.com/about#upgrade). If you own a ...


2

Storage is easy, and there are thousands of options. What I believe is critical is what else you need beyond storage. What kind of files?..JPEG, JPEG+RAW, RAW only. What kind of viewing?... confirm image files are stored, view photos, sort/view/share photos. What other types of files?...psd, tiff, dng, library backup. Considerations: Storage only: ...


2

High altitude considerations Obviously, it depends on where you travel, but keep in mind that hard drives may fail at altitudes above 3000 m (10000 ft). You should avoid using HDDs (netbooks/laptops/storage devices with a HDD) at such altitutes. Choose devices with a solid state drive (SSD) (there are also specially designed sealed and pressurized HDDs, ...


2

I am also a software developer and tried using Git and SVN for large RAWs and XMPs just for the ability to sync my pictures between removable drives and version the XMPs. It was unbearably slow and got slower over time as I added more files. I also use Lightroom for history, so I went back to rsync. Now, I am also looking into git-annex and so far it is ...


2

If you backup the library without the new images you would lose all of the new working copies of the images. That is how referenced images in iPhoto works. I would recommend against doing anything but backing up the entire 20GB library file unless you want to lose your changes. A better option is really to attack the actual issue here. A single iPhoto ...


2

Ideally, we have a solution that isn't tied to a specific product release in a moment of time. What you require is a device to bridge your camera to another storage media. There are a few options that I can think of: Portable WiFi device that can be battery powered or powered by a rechargeable pack and that has USB or SD ports. A WiFi smartphone with an app ...


2

Finally got my hands on a D7100 and tried out the option to copy images from one memory card to another. The camera will let you select a folder to copy or individual images. You then select a location to copy to. Here you can select a folder on the other memory card. I took a minute or two to copy 350 raw files using 90MB/s SD cards. If you then ...


2

When you open the import dialog in Lightroom, you have, at the top middle, (up to) four options: "Copy as DNG", "Copy", "Move", "Add". Adding to the catalog will be done in all cases. "Copy as DNG", "Copy" and "Move" copy your photos from their source to the folder you set on the right side. "Copy as DNG" converts them to DNG in the process. "Move" will ...


2

Put them the safest place you can, but even the safest place is never "safe." Remember the Jacques Lowe case? Had extended exclusive access behind the scenes of the Kennedy administration. Put his treasure trove of negs in the toughest vault he could find. In the basement of the World Trade Center.


2

You can use an USB hub on your tablet, I have a similar setup with my (rooted) Nexus 7 to read different USB key and it works. However, you may have power issues if you are using a hard drive. The power output of your tablet is probably about 500mA. Check the consumption of your HDD. If it's higher or close to 500mA, you will have to use some external power ...


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