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54

The general reccomendation is a 3-2-1 Backup strategy, meaning you have 3 copies: 2 local, 1 offsite. Here's one way: Get a NAS appliance (like a Drobo) to protect against a single disk crash (or just an external disk, with no single disk failure protection) Add an Apple Time Machine to get your 2nd local copy. If Time Machine is not for you, get ...


46

DCIM is short for Digital Camera IMages and is part of the industry standard outlined by the Design rule for Camera File system. This standard was adopted as the de facto standard for storing digital image and sound files in memory devices by the digital camera industry to insure interoperability from one brand to the next. From wikipedia: Design rule ...


22

Perhaps I'm a bit old-school in this way, but I personally avoid storing my stuff on "somebody else's computer" (a.k.a. the "cloud"). I would just buy (at least) two external drives of sufficient capacity - storage is cheap these days. Back up all your images onto one, and then make a copy of that drive on the other, so you have two copies. Generate a ...


18

I would suggest backing up three things: The original RAW files. Your RAW software's database of adjustments — usually, this is kept as lossless storage of what changes you made. High-quality (100%-quality JPEG or TIFF, depending on subject matter / detail) of developed images you've put a lot of work into. #1 keeps the originals. #2 lets you recreate your ...


16

I'm assuming that the card is just full and you're concerned about the impact of reformatting it and reusing — not that it's failing to the point where the maximum free space is 1% of what it used to be. Don't worry about formatting. The card is meant for reuse, and even cheap SD cards can go through hundreds of write/erase cycles, with higher-end cards ...


10

No! You want opaque lens caps because: Keep light out of the camera when not using it. In film cameras, the sensor is effectively always on. The shutter should in theory block all light, but stuff happens. With digital sensors, light hitting the sensor when not exposing doesn't corrupt the next picture, but you still want light not entering the lens ...


9

The easiest and faster way to backup is an external drive. 400 Gb is not that much and 1 Tb hard drives are pretty cheap. You could backup on two external hard drives and store one in a different place like a family member, in case (let's hope not) something happens like a burglar. The other option is online storage, but 400 Gb is too much for a free ...


8

Don't shrink them. In the grand scheme of things, you're talking about a very small amount of storage — your collection of 8000 photos at 6 megabytes fits in under 50 gigabytes. Even with high-quality archival storage, this isn't very much. Spend a small amount of money and get a larger drive and set up a back-up solution. To put it another way: the only ...


8

That volume is huge. Unless you take 420 GB of memory cards, the laptop is not going to be your backup, it is going to be your primary copy. This leaves you with a choice of media for your actual backup: Cloud storage is unfeasible because transferring 30+ GB takes more than a day with most services and in most part of the world even with the best ...


8

Chase Jarvis has written about how he manages his backups. you can find it here: http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2010/06/workflow-and-backup-for-photo-video/ Doing backups to DVD's works for smaller libraries, but as you've found, as it grows, it becomes impossible to maintain reliably. There are also issues with how long DVDs last before you risk starting ...


8

It is probably only advisable to enter tension in the system if your camera is being transported (e.g. travelling on a bumpy road), as some force may keep moving things in place. Prolonged tension of springs may result in them "aging" (dislocations (errors) in the metal accumulate and eventually crack), see fracture. Tension can also result in creep. And if ...


8

Black & white film is pretty robust. Remember it has been around for longer than air conditioning. In the old photo cookbooks (and even new ones, such as Steve Anchell's) there are recipes for tropical developers - for regular ones don't work in tropical heat. I found no record of tropical film stock; I presume colonial photographers shot with their ...


8

With Amazon Prime you can store an unlimited amount of Photos incl. Raw Files! https://www.amazon.de/b?ie=UTF8&node=12153288031


7

It depends on the type of film and on your post processing. For black and white films there is no need to cool them at all. When they mature well beyond their expiration date, they might get a bit slower if at all. It is different for colour emulsions. The three or four colour "layers" may mature at different speed which may then result in unwanted ...


7

Processed film does deteriorate, but not at such a rate that surviving 10-15 years would be remarkable! It also depends on the type of film; black & white film lasts longer than colour film for example. (Indeed, when film studios want to store an old colour movie, they separate the colour film into its R, G and B channels, and record each channel ...


7

'Photography files' are no different to any other kind of file. Use NTFS (because it allows for larger files and is generally the newer, better system) and the default allocation unit size - a larger size will make virtually no noticeable performance difference in a modern hard drive.


7

What you want is called an accordion bottle. These are opaque, plastic bottles shaped like a cylindrical bellows with a cap on one end. To use it, you pour in the liquid to be stored, compress the bottle until the level rises to the top and then install the cap. This customizes the size of the bottle for exactly the amount of liquid in it and eliminates ...


6

Things that are deliberately not covered in this answer: How to do a back up and discussion of proper disaster recovery procedures such as physical security and keeping multiple copies in multiple locations. Archival as it is the subject of the preservation of tools and platforms not specific files or formats. Optical media of any type (Bluray, DVD or ...


6

If the bag is subject to enough force to damage the hood, then I'd be worried for the lens/camera. There should be no problem leaving the hood on, however it can take up a lot more space. For this reason most hoods can be reversed for storage. If they can't be reversed, I often take the hood off and place it loose around the lens for extra protection.


6

I used to use Mac's Photos application, but I don't like the fact that it's generating some huge Library file which might get corrupted and without mac I can't access my images. Frankly, I think you're creating a non-issue. The Library "file" is not a single file, but an OSX package. It's simply a directory that displays as if it were a single file in the ...


6

Simple: so that when looking at the front of the print file sheet, the image appears correctly. The emulsion side of the film was the side facing the lens, the side receiving the image to expose. By inserting the emulsion side down, you are looking at the back of the image, just as you saw it through the lens, in the same orientation it was in the camera. ...


6

The only reason I can think of to continue keeping them is they'll be worth a heck of a lot more than they are now, with the original boxes, when your grandchildren want to sell them off in another 30 years:)


6

Get Google Photos. It's free, it's easy, and once you set it up then future backups are automatic.


6

You are basically on the right track. If you have a powder mix, as is common for black and white developers, the different substances are not uniformly distributed, but depending on grain size, density and perhaps even grain shape. It may work, but in general, you can't divide such a powder mix and expect the ratio of the different substances to remain the ...


5

Suppose you want to dedicate 50gb to photos. (50gb * 1024 mb/gb)/SIZE_OF_PHOTO, for my d7000 I get a result of about 2k photos. The 'easy' way is to just select a chunk of your image library, find the size and then see how many pictures it is. If you want more space used, select more pictures from the library.


5

The SD standard formally requires FAT16 for regular SD cards FAT32 for SDHC FAT64 ("exFAT") for SDXC those formats are indeed to be used by the in-camera format function. The latter choice has long been under fire by open source activist both due to strict licensing of the exFAT specifications - thus its poor support on anything that's not a recent ...


5

You've combined the pick/reject model with the star rating model -- which is fine -- however that's not necessarily representative of everyone's use. Personally, in my initial sort I almost never use pick but always use reject. Anything I don't want to keep is rejected (and deleted) so the remaining ones are, arguably, all picks. Marking all photos as pick ...


5

Yes, storing them in the fridge is a good idea. The cool temperature slows the degradation of the film. Additional benefit is gained from the stable temperature. To prevent condensation, being an issue, simply take the film out of the fridge the evening before you intend to use it. Leave it in the canister until it has had chance to warm up to room ...


5

SD cards are very safe when stored in their original plastic container at room temperature in a dry place. The same is generally true of Lithium Ion batteries. Protecting the metal contacts on the SD card and battery will prevent the majority of damage to either device, either through corrosion, physical damage, or electrical short. Storing the memory card (...


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