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54

The general reccomendation is a 3-2-1 Backup strategy, meaning you have 3 copies: 2 local, 1 offsite. Here's one way: Get a NAS appliance (like a Drobo) to protect against a single disk crash (or just an external disk, with no single disk failure protection) Add an Apple Time Machine to get your 2nd local copy. If Time Machine is not for you, get ...


45

DCIM is short for Digital Camera IMages and is part of the industry standard outlined by the Design rule for Camera File system. This standard was adopted as the de facto standard for storing digital image and sound files in memory devices by the digital camera industry to insure interoperability from one brand to the next. From wikipedia: Design rule ...


23

With electrolytic capacitors, disuse can cause slower discharge, and longer recycle times, which can be restored by firing and recycling the flash a few times. If you don't use them for a long period, the non-conducting dialectric can break down to the point they will short circuit. Periodically turning it on will charge the conductive plates and this will ...


22

Perhaps I'm a bit old-school in this way, but I personally avoid storing my stuff on "somebody else's computer" (a.k.a. the "cloud"). I would just buy (at least) two external drives of sufficient capacity - storage is cheap these days. Back up all your images onto one, and then make a copy of that drive on the other, so you have two copies. Generate a ...


21

Yes it is. Including the box when reselling items increases their perceived value. You will often see LNIB in listings which means Like New In Box. It tells you are a more careful owner. This is particularly important for cameras or bodies in the case DSLRs and SLDs which have lots of small pieces (cables, caps, manuals) and depreciate in value quickly. I ...


20

Purposely I avoid to use all of these types of devices while traveling. There are two reasons: They are all based on an internal hard-disk drive which is fragile. One drop and a traditional hard-disk is dead. Having moving parts is what makes it more fragile. In several of models you can get around this by replacing the disk with an SSD which solves this ...


18

I would suggest backing up three things: The original RAW files. Your RAW software's database of adjustments — usually, this is kept as lossless storage of what changes you made. High-quality (100%-quality JPEG or TIFF, depending on subject matter / detail) of developed images you've put a lot of work into. #1 keeps the originals. #2 lets you recreate your ...


17

That is normal. The camera doesn't know how many images there is left, as images take up different amount of space depending on how much detail they contain. So the camera displays a guesstimate based on the free space on the card and an average size for images taken with your current settings. If you take images with large areas of sky or other smooth ...


16

I'm assuming that the card is just full and you're concerned about the impact of reformatting it and reusing — not that it's failing to the point where the maximum free space is 1% of what it used to be. Don't worry about formatting. The card is meant for reuse, and even cheap SD cards can go through hundreds of write/erase cycles, with higher-end cards ...


12

I've had a couple of purpose-built copy-and-store devices that I bought for the same reasons you describe. One had a hard disk built in and the other burned CDs. They worked, but the better models were (and still are) costly. On the one with the built-in disk, I didn't like the idea that I couldn't pull the drive from the unit, plug it into a PC and ...


12

Lightroom is the way to go. Download the trial and give it a try, though I do recommend reading a bit or watching a few videos first to get the most out of your trial. Lightroom will let you do whatever you wish on the file system side, and then offer flexibility beyond it. This is important, because this NAS won't be your last, and in fact, you may have ...


10

No! You want opaque lens caps because: Keep light out of the camera when not using it. In film cameras, the sensor is effectively always on. The shutter should in theory block all light, but stuff happens. With digital sensors, light hitting the sensor when not exposing doesn't corrupt the next picture, but you still want light not entering the lens ...


9

The easiest and faster way to backup is an external drive. 400 Gb is not that much and 1 Tb hard drives are pretty cheap. You could backup on two external hard drives and store one in a different place like a family member, in case (let's hope not) something happens like a burglar. The other option is online storage, but 400 Gb is too much for a free ...


8

That count is a conservative estimate of how many pictures you can fit in the remaining space on your card, based on the maximum file size you could see with a JPEG Large. Depending on the image data, your JPEG might end up compressing better, which would mean the count would go down by less than 1 picture.


8

That volume is huge. Unless you take 420 GB of memory cards, the laptop is not going to be your backup, it is going to be your primary copy. This leaves you with a choice of media for your actual backup: Cloud storage is unfeasible because transferring 30+ GB takes more than a day with most services and in most part of the world even with the best ...


8

Don't shrink them. In the grand scheme of things, you're talking about a very small amount of storage — your collection of 8000 photos at 6 megabytes fits in under 50 gigabytes. Even with high-quality archival storage, this isn't very much. Spend a small amount of money and get a larger drive and set up a back-up solution. To put it another way: the only ...


8

Chase Jarvis has written about how he manages his backups. you can find it here: http://blog.chasejarvis.com/blog/2010/06/workflow-and-backup-for-photo-video/ Doing backups to DVD's works for smaller libraries, but as you've found, as it grows, it becomes impossible to maintain reliably. There are also issues with how long DVDs last before you risk starting ...


8

It is probably only advisable to enter tension in the system if your camera is being transported (e.g. travelling on a bumpy road), as some force may keep moving things in place. Prolonged tension of springs may result in them "aging" (dislocations (errors) in the metal accumulate and eventually crack), see fracture. Tension can also result in creep. And if ...


8

Black & white film is pretty robust. Remember it has been around for longer than air conditioning. In the old photo cookbooks (and even new ones, such as Steve Anchell's) there are recipes for tropical developers - for regular ones don't work in tropical heat. I found no record of tropical film stock; I presume colonial photographers shot with their ...


8

With Amazon Prime you can store an unlimited amount of Photos incl. Raw Files! https://www.amazon.de/b?ie=UTF8&node=12153288031


7

I would scan at the max of 600 dpi - however if the print resolution is so low that printing artifacts are visible at this resolution (e.g. small colored dots), then the result should either be downscaled or a median filter should be applied to eliminate them (or both). Don't go under 300 dpi no matter what or you won't be able to use them to reproduce new ...


7

Personally, I would say yes to keep boxes and packaging of lenses, not so much for tripods. If you'll ever ebay lenses, or want to ship a L lenses for inspection or realignment. Having the original packaging save you time and extra cash buying new bubble wraps.


7

It depends on the type of film and on your post processing. For black and white films there is no need to cool them at all. When they mature well beyond their expiration date, they might get a bit slower if at all. It is different for colour emulsions. The three or four colour "layers" may mature at different speed which may then result in unwanted ...


7

Processed film does deteriorate, but not at such a rate that surviving 10-15 years would be remarkable! It also depends on the type of film; black & white film lasts longer than colour film for example. (Indeed, when film studios want to store an old colour movie, they separate the colour film into its R, G and B channels, and record each channel ...


7

'Photography files' are no different to any other kind of file. Use NTFS (because it allows for larger files and is generally the newer, better system) and the default allocation unit size - a larger size will make virtually no noticeable performance difference in a modern hard drive.


7

What you want is called an accordion bottle. These are opaque, plastic bottles shaped like a cylindrical bellows with a cap on one end. To use it, you pour in the liquid to be stored, compress the bottle until the level rises to the top and then install the cap. This customizes the size of the bottle for exactly the amount of liquid in it and eliminates ...


6

I've tried several of these services - Backblaze, CrashPlan, mozy, carbonite. However, I've recently commited to CrashPlan for several reasons: Cheap monthly fee for unlimited storage. Can backup to more than one destination - I have a fileserver here in my house, so I backup to it and to CrashPlan online storage. VERY useful. you can have your friends ...


6

Unless weight and size are an over-over-overwhelming consideration then you would be very hard put to find something that beats a small netbook computer. It makes no sense to reject a computer solution absolutely - it should simply be put in the list along with the rest and compete on its own merits. Netbook: Downsides: Weight Size Battery life needs to ...


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