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11

Short answer: no. Long answer: no. Your Fujitsu point and shoot camera has a much lower throughput than your card's max, so the bottleneck with shooting lots of pictures very, very quickly will be the camera itself, not the memory card. Additionally, there will be absolutely no difference in image of video quality... this is digital after all.


10

The card has probably developed an error. Flash cards (including SD cards) have a limited number of writes, and, while the expected number is large, sometimes failures happen early. Or it could simply be a manufacturing defect. In either of these cases, Sandisk — which has awesome long warranty periods ­— will probably replace the card, but that doesn't do ...


9

The GoPro HD Hero 2 states on the FAQ page: You will need to get a class-4 or higher SD card from a reputable brand and source in order to use the camera effectively. A class-10 SD card is recommended when using Time-Lapse mode or photo every 0.5 seconds. Class 4 isn't that fast by today's standards, and actually equates to 4MB/s read/write speeds. The ...


8

In my camera, that's what I have, and I have no problems. At worst, your transfer speeds may be slower. But it will most definitely not affect the images captured.


5

See this dpreview thread. Consensus seems to be that for the Nikon D5100 class 6 is fine for single shots, but you really need class 10 if you want to do burst shots (Continuous Mode). A class 10 will also allow faster transfers to your PC. I wouldn't expect switching to class 10 to improve your battery life. Your card has very little battery consumption ...


4

There is likely a hidden folder on the card somewhere that is using up your space. Using a utility like DaisyDisk on the Mac will help identify the missing space, and let you clean it up. I have found that some cards have ".Trashes" folder that gets created and keeps copies of a bunch of junk you've deleted in the past. removing this folder will let you ...


4

According to DPreview it supports SD and SDHC cards. This includes all the classes of these cards. The classes only differ from each other regarding write speeds. Here is more information on that. As the D40x can not record video, a class 10 card is not necessary. A lower speed card is sufficient to take pictures.


4

Rob Galbraith has a full spread of tests with just about every popular card for this camera. To sum up the results, the fastest card is the SanDisk Extreme Pro 8GB SDHC card. It performed at 27.7MB/s JPEG and 26.4MB/s RAW for a burst of 39 shots in 30 seconds. The speed test was performed by shooting 17 JPEG Fine and then 10 NEF files. More info can be ...


3

It is compatible. All cameras supporting SDXC also accept SDHC and SD. SD cards are limited to 2 GB. SDHC to 32 GB and SDXC have a theoretical limit of 2 TB. SDXC memory cards also usually use a different file-system which is exFAT, rather than FAT. In the case of 16GB, it is always SDHC. Although it would be possible to make a 16GB SDXC cards, no one does ...


3

It sounds to me like your card is dead or damaged. I recommend that you follow the instructions in the comments to your question and try to recover what you can. Memory cards fail, it does not happen very often for most people, but it does happen. I have had 3 die over the last 10 years. You can check to see if your card has a warranty or guarantee of some ...


3

The speed at which you can import the photos is governed by the card type and the cable you use to connect to your computer, so first make sure you have the fastest type of card available. Lexar make a Firewire 800 card reader which is stackable, so you can link two or more together as FW800 allows you to daisy chain devices in series. If you use a Mac you ...


3

Toshiba is a reputable company that does put out quality products. At one time they have even had claims to fame for the fastest SD cards(source). If you are looking for the cheapest of the cheap, I do not know why you are necessarily asking this question. They are not a popular brand of memory cards, so you will not find many reviews(if any). If you are ...


3

If you are looking for a more credible or official source stating what SD card works the best with the GoPro Hero 2, I would look no further then the EyeOfMine website. They are a very well known company that produces their own aftermarket accessories for GoPro cameras. I doubt you could find a company with more experience modifying and getting the most out ...


2

Don't forget, that the USB channel has bandwidth limitations. USB 2.0 spec High Speed is 480 Mbps (megabits per second). This means that an 8GB card can theoretically transfer in 134 seconds. Firewire 800, can do this in 80 seconds (Firewire 400 in 160 sec). Now, this is theoretical, because every USB or Firewire device connnected utilizes bandwidth. If ...


2

I'm wondering if the issue isn't the space is full, but instead the File table is full. FAT32 is supposed to allow 65,534 files in a directory, but I've seen cases where the implementation of the hardware has more restrictive than the standard. I have to ask, why do you want to carry over two thousand pictures in the camera? My tendency is to get the ...


2

There shouldn't be an issue (the camera shouldn't be able to discern between a regular SD card and a micro SD in an adapter), just be aware that the camera might want you to format the card (and even if it doesn't, it's a good practice to do so), hence you will lose any data you may have on the card. You might need to format it again when you put it back in ...


2

According to Nikon's support page, Approved SD cards for D40, 4 GB is the highest-capacity supported SDHC cards. And note, "Other brands and capacities of cards may work, but Nikon cannot guarantee their operation."


2

From the card's perspective, there really isn't any difference between what the camera does while formatting and when it's writing pictures. It's all just data written to blocks on the device* and you're not doing it any harm. The format done by a camera does a couple of small writes: a fresh partition table and new file system headers. Both of these make ...


2

SDHC and SDXC are descriptions of the card formats (Secure Digital High Capacity and eXtended Capacity). SDHC only supports cards of less than 32GB, while SDXC supports cards with more than 32GB. If your camera does not support SDXC, nothing you do to the card will make it work properly. The camera might see the 128GB card as a 32GB card, but the odds of ...


1

From Lexar Website: "SDXC is an SD memory card format that is based on the SDA 3.0 specification. SD and SDHC cards are based on the SDA 2.0 specification. SDXC memory cards use the newer “exFAT” file system that is more efficient for SDXC’s large capacities, while SD and SDHC memory cards use the FAT32 file system. This difference is the reason that the ...


1

It is possible that the card does not have a partition table. I have encountered a few problematic cards that were formatted this way. In these cases, the card was formatted with a file system, but no underlying partition structure.  Such cards would still be readable by your camera, and you can try transferring files through your camera. However, this is ...


1

Can this harm the SD card or is it ok? It's more than OK. It can actually be beneficial. You're much more likely to extend the life of the card, as compared to never formatting and only erasing images in the card, by formatting regularly. The way flash memory cards (and USB flash drives) work is that the memory controller on the card assigns different ...


1

Just a side note: slowness during making night shots may be due to noise reduction... The data transfer speed is easy to calculate. Take a picture of your choice (e.g. RAW with 12-bit, uncompressed - just an example), and see the file size of that. (Or average the sizes of the pictures you have made - or find the worst case size.) Now, when you make ...


1

Benchmark the card read/write speeds on your (or someone else's) computer. Class 10 should read & write at speeds of at least 10 MB/sec. For stable recording at 1080p@30fps, you probably need about 6 MB/sec minimum write speed. If the card isn't performing at its specified rate, then this could be your problem. You could use something like hdtune on ...


1

I've come across that. It's because the card reader you're using doesn't support SDHC and nothing to do with Windows 8 at all. Don't format the card on the PC as you'll create a 2gb partition and then that's all your camera will format. Get yourself a decent reader and the problem will disappear.


1

The Raspberry Pi has a lot of weirdness happening when it comes to SD cards. What will have happened is not a broken card - although it would be reasonable to expect people who've not had the experience to assume that it is. Actually the problem is that Linux on the Pi has knackered the 'partition table'. That is not overwritten by either the in-camera ...


1

Electronic memory (Memory cards and Solid-State harddrives) are prone to failure over time. Each bit of storage on the devices can only be written-to and read-from so many times before they fail. To combat this, the memory card or drive will usually have extra storage that's invisible to you. When a storage block dies, one of the extra blocks is allocated ...


1

Macs place a hidden file and folder on mounted volumes. The file is always small but if you delete files from the card using Finder then they will end up in .Trashes until the the trash is emptied. Some other possible reasons might be you have done some kind of move or copy/delete, or copied something to the card, or maybe you never formatted the card when ...


1

I have one of these and they are great; you can download 4 CF cards at a time: http://www.techchee.com/2008/02/03/delkin-imagerouter-card-reader-connects-multiple-cf-cards/


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