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13

Both of those are video concerns, and have no real impact on still photography at all. A faster card may allow you to shoot more pictures more quickly, or to shoot longer in high-FPS burst mode (depending on the camera's processor), and that may matter depending on the kind of photography you do. If you don't spend a lot of time shooting in machine-gun mode, ...


9

The answer to pretty much all your questions is one word: video. Exact details of bit rates, video formats and whatever else are off-topic on this site which is about still photography so I won't go into it here, but basically you don't need to worry about this unless you intend to shoot video. One thing to note though: the speeds quoted for SD cards are ...


4

Most of your concerns are exclusively about video capture. The higher the resolution (how many pixels wide and tall your video has), the higher the frame rate (how many frames per second your video uses), and the lower the compression (how many slightly different colors are grouped in the same bucket as a single color - that's a bit simplistic but ...


3

I just took a very quick look at the manaul online, and right there on page 3, it says: Compatible Cards The camera can use the following cards regardless of capacity: SD memory cards SDHC memory cards* SDXC memory cards* *UHS-I cards supported. I would advise having a read through the Wikipedia article on SD cards. Card capacities are not the main ...


3

Speaking for the X-T4 specifically: It can record video at a maximum bitrate of 400Mb/s (Mega Bit) which equal 50MB/s (Mega Byte). Have a look at the video rating (V30, V60, V90) of the SD Cards you are considering. The number after the V tells you how fast it will write continuously, it's the guaranteed minimum writing speed in MB. So if you want to go with ...


2

Log sampling and 4K video, are two different things. The first one is about how the video data is recorded, $k is simply put the resolution - or how many pixels of data you record. As for the original question real world scenario that meets the high frame per second shooting of still images for longer (that's the only time when the write speed of your sd ...


2

That's an entire .1% of the flash card that is returning bad data. Unless it's a bug in your flash card reader (which, BTW, is a very real possibility), I'd probably throw the flash card in the trash. (If it appears to be from a reputable manufacturer, it's probably a fake.) I mean, a 128 GB flash card is only what, about twenty bucks? It's just not worth ...


1

From speeds you mention, it seems like you were looking at Lexar SD cards. The speed prominently displayed at the front is read speed, while write speed can be dramatically lower. 250 MB/s read, but only 120 MB/s write speed 300 MB/s read, and 260 MB/s write Much more significant difference in writing than reading speeds as well as a different class of ...


1

The write speed of a SD card is specified as its "class", which is the important characteristic when using the card for video.


1

As Mark Ransom states: Definitely no question that your files have become corrupted. Now the only question is how. It appears space was allocated on the card and filled with 0xFF instead of image data. This can occur when media are removed before all data has been written. If you no longer have access to the original files, there is nothing you can do to ...


1

I was dealing with the exact same problem. I took a Q-Tip and wiped the contacts off on the card. Worked like a champ!! The camera would read other cards and my computer would read the one the camera didn't like. So give it a try. Seems the camera may be a little more sensitive to the condition of the contacts. Good Luck!


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