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29

Why not save all the confusion and just format it in the camera? Both Mac and Windows can read, write and format exFAT, but you need to make sure you are using MBR rather than GUID and the correct sector size that the camera prefers. Rather than have to work all this out, especially if you're not even sure what they mean… just let the camera do it instead. ...


12

Both of those are video concerns, and have no real impact on still photography at all. A faster card may allow you to shoot more pictures more quickly, or to shoot longer in high-FPS burst mode (depending on the camera's processor), and that may matter depending on the kind of photography you do. If you don't spend a lot of time shooting in machine-gun mode, ...


9

The answer to pretty much all your questions is one word: video. Exact details of bit rates, video formats and whatever else are off-topic on this site which is about still photography so I won't go into it here, but basically you don't need to worry about this unless you intend to shoot video. One thing to note though: the speeds quoted for SD cards are ...


4

Most of your concerns are exclusively about video capture. The higher the resolution (how many pixels wide and tall your video has), the higher the frame rate (how many frames per second your video uses), and the lower the compression (how many slightly different colors are grouped in the same bucket as a single color - that's a bit simplistic but ...


3

It depends. As the sentence above was a quote from me, let me elaborate: While cameras are really good at writing images to an SD card, most of them are only so-so when it come to reading a modified SD card. This includes a card that was formatted in computer as well as making sense of temporary or meta files that were written by a computer. Some cameras ...


3

I can only strongly recommend not to format the SD card for use in the camera on a Mac or PC. A lot of write failures that I hear from in the Fuji and Sony context (including freezing of the camera itself) have been traced back to SD cards that were not formatted in camera. Telling us, that you ran into a full SD card and are only now creating a backup of ...


2

That's an entire .1% of the flash card that is returning bad data. Unless it's a bug in your flash card reader (which, BTW, is a very real possibility), I'd probably throw the flash card in the trash. (If it appears to be from a reputable manufacturer, it's probably a fake.) I mean, a 128 GB flash card is only what, about twenty bucks? It's just not worth ...


2

Beyond the particulars of each specific camera and how they may handle cards formatted on other devices, there are also benefits to regularly formatting flash type memory. Bad sectors are mapped out by the card's controller. Most memory cards have a bit more memory than their listed capacity. When a bad sector is identified, the memory controller will ...


2

Log sampling and 4K video, are two different things. The first one is about how the video data is recorded, $k is simply put the resolution - or how many pixels of data you record. As for the original question real world scenario that meets the high frame per second shooting of still images for longer (that's the only time when the write speed of your sd ...


2

My solution to this problem was to format the 64gb card in the camera which produced a non-working card giving the Full error. I then put the card in my laptop and using Aomei partition manger reduced the partition size to below 32gb. The card then worked perfectly in the camera. Though obviously half capacity. If you reformat the card in the camera it will ...


1

From speeds you mention, it seems like you were looking at Lexar SD cards. The speed prominently displayed at the front is read speed, while write speed can be dramatically lower. 250 MB/s read, but only 120 MB/s write speed 300 MB/s read, and 260 MB/s write Much more significant difference in writing than reading speeds as well as a different class of ...


1

The write speed of a SD card is specified as its "class", which is the important characteristic when using the card for video.


1

As Mark Ransom states: Definitely no question that your files have become corrupted. Now the only question is how. It appears space was allocated on the card and filled with 0xFF instead of image data. This can occur when media are removed before all data has been written. If you no longer have access to the original files, there is nothing you can do to ...


1

This is normal and expected. It's basically queuing theory. Here's an analogy that might help in visualizing this: If you walk into an empty store (sensor/camera), grab an item (light/data), and get in line (buffer) for the cash register, they'll ring you up right away (write to SD card), and you're on your way. If you walk into a packed supermarket and ...


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