Hot answers tagged

18

that purple haze is probably a color cast caused by the glass itself; the welders glass often isn't neutral color. you should be looking at solar filters, or very dark (and probably stacked) ND filters. Thousand Oaks sells solar filters, to name one company.


17

It's because that image is only capturing the visible spectrum. Most of the images you see of the sun are capturing the ultraviolet spectrum, where you see some really impressive explosions and coronal ejections: (source: caltech.edu) That image was taken from space with a highly specialised scientific camera, but you can capture some details, including ...


14

At very wide angles the danger is much less and taking photos with the sun in the field of view doesn't normally harm the camera or lens. When the sun is very low on the horizon the energy is also reduced as there is much more of Earth's atmosphere to absorb much of that energy between an observer on the ground than when the sun is high in the sky. More ...


12

tl; dr. Blend a "panorama" from only slightly rotated exposures and make sure no flare is included in the final result. It's not possible to optically remove this type of flare when shooting into the sun (though different lenses have different levels of flare resistance). However, there are other effective ways to get rid of it. What you can do is take ...


11

I have done three things in the past to deal with this. Compose the photo in such a way that the lens flare is attractive... that's a great choice for your example above because the sun is IN the photo. Some lenses have an attractive flare (many don't) Use lens hoods, paper, or your hand to block the light that is causing the flare. This works when the ...


9

If I understand what your asking, how to get the sun to produce a multi-pointed sunburst or star flare like that (Fraunhofer diffraction), its relatively simple: stop down your aperture to the point where it is no longer circular, but a polygonal. Using a fairly small aperture will produce a star flare around most light sources that are not too small. The ...


9

This is just the diffused light going through the welder glass. It comes from two sources: the sky and the two welder glass. (These have coplanar surfaces that allows for bouncing the light for long.) You cannot do anything with those either. You need to use optical quality filters (ND filters of high value) to achieve this effect, although then you will ...


8

You can get all sorts of interesting shapes and colours when shooting directly into a lightsource like that. All pieces of glass reflect a certain amount of light and transmit a certain amount, so you actually get flare from everything in your scene every time you shoot, only it's usually much dimmer than the rest of the picture so you don't see it. When ...


8

Field of View The sun is approximately 0.5° across in the sky. At 200mm on a DX (1.5 crop factor) body, the field of view (FoV) is 6.9° (wide) / 4.5° (high) / 8° (diag). In terms of Sun diameters (☉), the 200mm FoV is 13.4 ☉ wide by 9 ☉ high. According to Wikipedia, Mercury's diameter when viewed from the earth during May transits is 12 arcseconds. In ...


7

Don't use the UV filter. Not only is it completely useless while using an actual solar filter, it is actively hurting your image by creating reflections. Even if it is the highest-quality UV filter with multi-coating, the strong and contrasty image of the sun will bounce off the lens (usually the front element), to the filter's flat surface, and back to the ...


6

WARNING: All care and no responsibility !!! This is YOUR EYES at stake - exercise due care. If smoke curls gently from the camera, odds are you have got it wrong. Be very aware that a camera optical system MAY focus the sun's rays into a viewfinder - even if the main image is defocused. Don't be scared away by the potential risks - just be certain ...


6

Alan Friedman, the astronomer featured, gave a TEDx talk late last year where he spoke about his inspiration for making these pictures. (Here's the link for the video: http://youtu.be/LTtTfCwkIW0) In the video, he shows some of his gear. He has two telescopes he's using. One is a refractor that probably has a built-in Hydrogen Alpha filter in place for ...


6

Those pictures seems to be taken trough a telescope with an H-alpha filter. Most of them are converted to black and white. There is a whole website dedicated for solar photography: http://www.hydrogenalpha.com/ Here is some info about H-alpha filter: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H-alpha To take similar pictures, you will need a telescope, F-mount to ...


6

The pixels are not overexposed in any channel, and applying a heavy curve will reveal the darker edges and some dark spots. What you have is an exposed-to-the-right image of how the sun looks like - it is a big shiny ball. IMHO you should have enough data in RAW to tweak this into a usable image.


6

It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to tell at times. Here's a list a strategies I might use to tell the difference: Look for contextual clues. Even a tiny recognizable feature could reveal the cardinal direction. Atmospheric clarity. During a sunrise, the dust has had time to settle at night, making the sky clearer than at sunset, where there is a ...


6

My Sony Alpha 6000 experienced extensive burn in from photographing the sun. The burn in happened either during experimentation prior to the eclipse, or during the August 21 eclipse. The burn in areas are the same hexagonal shape as the closed down aperture of the lens. It was a manual aperture Leicaflex lens with an E mount adapter. I don't think the burn ...


6

Without having more information on how exactly you took your image, and without the possibility to reproduce this effect, one can only guess. I see three possible causes for a sun reflection that is visible in the view finder, but does not appear in the image that is taken by the image sensor: Automatic aperture control Possibly you took your picture with ...


5

If you take a quick photo of the sun, it is unlikely that you will damage the sensor - or the shutter, but you may blind yourself a bit (speaking from experience here). If you shoot a photo of the sun in LiveView, you can generate a lot of heat on the sensor from the lens focusing the sunlight. Having said that, I have pointed a compact camera into the sun ...


5

First I would look at the camera manual to see if there is some kind of warning. Here is an extract of the manual of my camera (d300s) : When shooting in live view mode, avoid pointing the camera at the sun or other strong light sources. Failure to observe this precaution could result in damage to the camera’s internal circuitry. Or also Keep the ...


5

Lens flare happens when light internally reflects within the lens itself. There are a few possible sources of internal reflection. You could get it from using a non-digital lens on a digital camera and getting reflection off the sensor (doesn't seem like the case here), you could get it off a filter placed on the front of the lens (light tends to bounce ...


5

You have already used the "best" settings : low ISO, fast shutter speed and small aperture. However, you have reached a physical limitation called "diffraction". Take a look at this question : Why do light sources appear as stars sometimes?. Short story : small light source + small aperture = "star" effect. This image explains it well (taken from https://...


5

Probably not. But it depends on just how dark and what type your ND filter is. It can be very dangerous to both your equipment and your eyes to try and take photos of the sun without the proper precautions! The most damaging portion of direct sunlight to the internals of your lens, camera, and eyes are in infrared, not in the visible spectrum. The UV filter ...


5

Main Differences The main differences between most neutral density(ND) filters and a solar filter(white light) come down to the filtering strength and the filtering properties. The strength of the more common ND filters range from 1-10 stops, where as for safe solar eclipse viewing you want to use 13 or more stops for imaging and 16 or more stops for direct ...


5

The Photographer's Ephemeris is a very popular app used by landscape photographers who need to know when the Moon/Sun is going to be at specific spots. It may be of great help to you.


4

I looks to me like the haze left behind from lens cleaner that didn't do a perfect job. Clean the surface of the lens again to remove the residual scum. BTW, Improperly used aerosol pressurized products such as "Dust-Off" leave behind a nasty, hard to remove coating of residual propellant. Don't soak the lens. Use lens cleaning fluids sparingly. EDIT: All ...


4

The problem with doing what you did in Live View is that even though you are taking the photo at f/22, the aperture of your lens is likely at f/1.4 until you click the shutter. The energy of the sun is strong enough when focused by your lens to heat the internals of your camera very quickly. If things get hot enough, they will be damaged. Even if the heat ...


4

It didn't "cut" your photo, as such, it's simply that this part of the sensor is basically blown out on all channels and so has become pure white. If you think of each spot on the sensor as basically a bucket that can contain some amount a light, what has happened is that the sun, being such an intense source of light, has filled all the buckets in the area ...


4

I think there's two reasons for this. One is the lens not being optimally clean, like others have suggested. The largest blob closest to the Sun seems to suggest that by not being in line with the rest of the lens flare and having a more pronounced light refraction than I'd personally expect. Another, less pronounced (i.e. out of focus, suggesting a ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible