31

No, changing the exposure or using an ND filter will not help you with this, since both will only brighten or darken everything by a certain factor. Your problem is the large relative difference between the bright and dark parts, the dynamic range. And your eyes can capture a much larger dynamic range than the camera's sensor. In order to have a photo ...


29

You've got the sun almost in the frame. This is causing huge amounts of veiling flare — light bouncing all around, reducing contrast. You'll get better results from a different angle, or at a different time of day. Did you have a lens hood? If so, positioning the camera so the hood can better do its job would help. And, yeah, it probably isn't doing you any ...


20

Absolutely you can. Many square filter holders are specifically designed for this: The Lee Filters systems (Sev5n, 100mm) have optional front threaded rings designed to hold a polarizer in front of the ND filter(s). The NiSi 70mm and 100mm square filter holders feature a specially-made thin polarizer filter meant to stack behind the ND filters, closest to ...


15

Aside from moving water, what other motion blur applications can one achieve with an ND filter? Pretty much anything that moves in relation to the camera. One can make people moving through a scene totally disappear by using enough density to require an exposure time of several minutes or longer. Imagine pacing a train while your assistant drives on a ...


14

Why did my ND filter produce washed out exposures? You're shooting straight into the sun with a dirty, unshaded, and flat surface on the front of your lens. The image demonstrates all three classic types of lens flare: Veiling - General loss of contrast due to strong off-axis light sources, often caused by such light interacting with dust, particularly ...


14

That is a really tough question because it is so situation dependent. It depends on the look you want to achieve and also the light that you are facing. You almost always have the wrong filter with you. When I started using ND filters I always went for a 10-30 second exposure just because I was excited to get the smoothest water flow in my images. Therefore ...


10

It really depends of the kind of pictures you want to take. Look at "What are the uses of Neutral Density (ND) filters?" for information about potential ND filter uses. You can also take a look at "What are neutral density filters and how do I use them to create long exposures in daylight?" to know more about those filters. A direct way to know the ND ...


10

It's easy to lost perspective when referring to stops due to the fact that it is a logarithmic scale. When talking about ND filters each stop represents a halving of the intensity of incoming light. Like grains of rice on a chessboard it starts to add up very quickly. A 15 stop ND filter reduces incoming light intensity by a factor of 32,768. That's enough ...


10

I have to disagree (to a limited degree) with most the answers you've gotten. For a picture like this, a longer exposure will probably do a little to reduce contrast a bit. Not much, but a bit. This happens in at least a couple of ways. First of all, over the course of a 30 second exposure, the sun will move a little bit. That will do a little to soften the ...


9

We have no idea of the brightness of the scene you are photographing. Are you on a Mediterranean beach? In a forest at night? Put the camera on automatic, take a photo, and see what iso, aperture and shutter speed the camera chooses. You should aim for the same exposure, but just adjust other exposure settings (including choice of ND filter) so that you can ...


9

Is this combination of ND filter and long exposure responsible for having such even lighting on the scene in the former image? No. The reason for the ND filter is to allow the long exposure, but the reason for the long exposure is to "smooth" the stream. This combination is a popular stylistic choice when shooting moving water.


8

As a welder and new to photography I recently researched the possibility of filming the welding process, my research found many sources including this site and the post to which this attached... and although this is an old post I though my research to date might be useful to people on the forum Malcolm Diamond College of Western Idaho


8

It doesn't matter much which filter you get. If you get the "wrong" one, you will have gained invaluable XP that will contribute to your continued advancement in photography. Options to consider: Don't get either filter. Since you will be using a tripod, you can use your current filter (or no filter) to take and blend multiple exposures. You can also play ...


8

TL;DR: Get the best 10-stop filter you are willing to afford. There are several to choose from, compared to shopping for a 9-stop filter. In no particular order, some considerations: This is very specific to the exact location you're shooting, but in my experience, the waterfall scene is darker than the Sunny 16 rule indicates. Usually, there's a bit of ...


7

Without knowing what strength of ND filter you were using, or under what lighting conditions, I can't give a specific answer. However, a little bit of back-of-the-envelope math can help give you an idea of the magnitude of the problem. Assuming you were shooting a brightly-lit scene under bright midday sun, without any ND filters, the Sunny 16 rule states ...


7

It is impossible to say without trying the filter on the lens you intend to use it on and under the conditions you are going to use the combination. It is IMHO impossible just by a visual inspection of the scratch to determine wether or not it will or may have impact on the pictures you are going to take. If you can't try the filter before buying or are not ...


7

Just to get the full understanding: Only to freeze fast moving subjects which need shorter shutter speeds than the flash's burning speed HSS is really required? Sort of. That is a common reason to use HSS, but there are also other use cases where HSS may be preferable to using ND filters. When you also want to use narrower apertures interspersed with wide ...


6

You haven't given enough information to produce a definitive answer, but here's how I suggest you can help determine the information yourself. I own and use 2 sets of ND grads from 1–3 stops, both hard-transition and soft-transition, plus a few specialty transition ND grads (reverse ND grad, "sunset strip" ND, 0-transition/continuous ND grad). Hard vs. ...


6

The filter is almost certainly an ND0.4 (or ND.4) filter. Filters specified as ND .4 have a transmissivity of 10^(1/0.4) which is .398. Looking at the 4 measurements the OP made, the reflectance at 520nm (approx. peak of visual response) is .40. The other 3, lux, exposure steps of 1/3 f-stop, and raw histogram range from .38 to .41. This corresponds very ...


6

Most moving things becomes blurry and unrecognizable at slow shutter speeds. Other uses of an ND filter I have seen: Moving clouds Cities (moving bits (cars, people) disappear)


5

A "big stopper" reduces light by a factor of 1000x, whereas Baader Astro filter film reduces light by a factor of 100,000x. You may get away with using the big stopper if you're using live view on a dSLR but I'd seriously recommend avoiding viewing through the finder. If you fried your sensor that would be bad, but not as bad as burning a retina. Stacking ...


5

You mention you need an ND filter. There are different reasons for needing an ND filter, and this will affect what strength you'll need: Shooting wide aperture in daylight. For example, you want to go f/1.4 in bright daylight but that would push you past your camera's shutter speed limit (say 1/2000s). In this case 2 or 3 stops is fine, as either will ...


5

A polarizing filter will probably cut out 2 stops of light, which would allow you to shoot at 1/200 instead of 1/800. Depending on your lens, you might be able to shoot at f/11 or f/16 and further reduce the shutter speed. You should get good prop blur at 1/125 or so. The problem with a CPL is that as you pan across the sky, or rotate the camera from ...


5

The approximate manual camera setting is likely achieved using the tried and true “sunny 16 rule”. Shutter speed is 1/ISO with the aperture set to f/16. Since you have chosen ISO 100, the exposure, according to this rule of thumb is 1/100 (likely you don’t have the 1/100 so we set the shutter @ 1/125 of a second @ f/16. You have chosen to set the aperture at ...


5

The short answer is that your ND filter is not strong enough. As Alan Marcus's answer points out, according to the Sunny 16 rule, in bright daylight at ƒ/16, you will get a nominally-correct exposure when your shutter speed is the inverse of your ISO (i.e., at ISO 100, you should set the shutter to 1/100 s). Setting the aperture at ƒ/22 buys you an ...


5

In theory, the 10-stop and 8-stop filter could do the job (with about 1 1/3 stop disadvantage to a solar filter). 2^(10+8) is a light reduction factor of 262,144 and solar filters usually have a factor of 100,000. Two filters are better than three here because of potential ghosting occurring from internal reflections between the filters. However, the main ...


5

Most of what you seem to think was accomplished by using the ND filter was actually accomplished using one of several raw conversion/post-processing techniques to reduce the contrast of the final form of the image. All digital photos start out as raw image data that would be unrecognizable if displayed on a screen without any processing. The main difference ...


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