69

I think Stan said it best in regards to composition and light, but I'll try to be a bit more specific about your pictures. What are you trying to show? This is the most important question to ask yourself before clicking the shutter. If you don't know, or don't address it, the audience won't know either and the picture will look sortof "pointless". Your ...


65

You can digitally enhance your pictures by increasing the brightness and adjusting the contrast. You can also crop out any parts of the image that don't contribute to the impressive nature of it. Take advantage of angles to convey attributes such as size and distance. Using perspective can also help liven up your images. I think the main concern is that the ...


38

It's worth noting that sensor size plays a huge role in depth of field and behavior of the lens. A smartphone has a tiny camera sensor, often around 25 square mm. This gives the camera a crop factor of about 6. (For the Samsung S9, I'm not sure about the dimensions.) You can calculate the hyperfocal distance (or "depth of field") but you can also get a ...


37

The Black Card Technique is a workaround for the problem of the limited dynamic range of digital cameras. The dynamic range of a camera describes the difference in light levels it can record. The limits of dynamic range are often seen in landscape photography - you will often see photos where the sky is nicely exposed, but the ground is underexposed, or ...


36

You can't. I don't care what you've seen on CSI, this just isn't possible in the real world. Even taking Canon's ridiculously big (and now discontinued. Oh, and $100,000) 1200mm lens, The Digital Picture say: faces were recognizable at distances up to a mile or more However, you're talking about six times that distance. You could think about mounting a ...


35

It looks like there are parallel light trails below each streelamp -- going down, then right, then down some more (ASCII art): / | | | \_ \ | And highlighted on the original: I would guess that these are when the shutter button was pressed, tilting the camera, because only bright sources show this effect. This is in addition to the normal, more ...


34

To investigate sensor dust, perform the following test: Close your aperture as much as possible (high F-number). This makes the sensor dust more visible. Increase the focal length as much as possible (zoom in). Focus on infinity (not sure if the focus part is actually necessary) on a bright, uniform background. I've found that the blue sky works well for ...


32

The mountain and the valley obviously are static -- even more from that distance. The clouds, however, move. If you chose a low ISO value, e.g., in the range of 50 to 100, the exposure time might be enough to get washy/faded/blurred clouds. If I calculated it correctly, an ISO value of 100 with the other settings (exluding shutter speed) staying the same ...


32

If we start by just numbering them 1 - 6 for easy reference... Personally, I'd discount 5 altogether as it has none of the aspects we're looking for. 2 is a bit naïve & perhaps achieves a lot of its usable aspects almost by accident, however, because it does achieve some of them, let's keep it in consideration. 1 through 3 all have some element in the ...


31

Depth of field depends not only on aperture but also on distance to the subject. Depth of field increases as the subject gets farther away. If the wave and boats were all relatively far from the camera, but not terribly far from each other, then it's not surprising that they were all reasonably sharp. You can use DOFMaster to run the numbers yourself. Some ...


27

This picture, and others similar to it, aren't pictures of the woman. These are travel snapshots, with some landmark and a woman in the same frame. There's nothing wrong with such snapshots per se. In fact, they're pretty great: they show where you were, remind you of the good times, and they're not anything like the travel postcards you could buy, even ...


26

A very long exposure doesn't help with shots like this due to the rotation of the Earth. Depending on your field of view you can get star trails (where instead of individual points of light you get lines where the stars have moved relative to the camera) with exposures of only 10 seconds. With a wide angle lens you can get away with longer exposures, e.g. 30 ...


26

You'll want to use a polarization filter. Rotate it until you get the effect you want. By the way, make sure you get a circular polarizer (most modern ones), the older linear polarizers can confuse the light metering and autofocus systems in the camera (no damage, you'll just not get good results).


26

There's probably something on the sensor - maybe a dust particle. You can check if the Canon camera has a sensor cleaning option and use it or take the camera to a local repair shop and have the sensor cleaned there. Or you can clean the sensor yourself, but I wouldn't recommend it, as you are a beginner.


25

By specifying that you want to do your surveillance photography in "good sun light", you have already shot yourself in the foot. The best time to do this kind of photography is at night or in the very early morning before the heat from the sun has time to create the "thermals" that make extreme telephoto photography almost impossible, even with the very best ...


24

Filter Types There are essentially 3 kinds of GND filter: Soft, Hard, and Sunrise/Set. All these come in various 'strengths'. Soft GND filters have a gentle gradient from dark to transparent and so are good for landscapes with irregular horizons such as mountains, hills and to some extent buildings. Hard GND filters have a more sudden change between dark ...


23

Short of asking Peter Lik himself, or finding he posted the techniques online, I could only speculate on which techniques he actually did use. I am assuming he did post processing. Some possibilities include: Start with a good dark sky location. The Australian outback has a lot of that. Some places elsewhere are also good (at times). Use prime focus ...


21

What's the difference between “Fake HDR” and real, bracketed exposure HDR? The only difference is how broadly or narrowly you decide to define the term High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDR). Do you use the broader term as it has been historically used for over 150 years to reference techniques used to display a scene with higher dynamic range than the dynamic ...


20

If by "landscape" you mean something like this: then the answer is simple: at very large distances, depth of field is extremely large even at large apertures. That is, at any aperture if you focus at infinity, objects 20m, 200m, and 2000m from you will be sharp. However, focal length of the lens also influences depth of field, see answers below. Smaller ...


19

The general consensus in this thread is that detailed photography of a subject at a range of 10km is exceedingly difficult, and probably impossible using commercially available equipment — and there's plenty of evidence to support that in the other answers. However, there is a way to photograph extremely distant targets in extreme detail — it's just not ...


18

I usually use this technique for pictures taken through windows, but I think it works here, too. In GIMP, I go to Colors | Curves and change the slope of the curve to use all of the available color information: I like to set the new start/end points for the curve to where the little black line along the bottom of the curves starts and ends. Usually ...


18

my (beginners) understanding of landscape photos is that you generally want them to be with a wide-angle lens My understanding of landscape photos is that they should contain some landscape! I can understand the association with wide angle lenses, though. You typically want to get a lot in, a photo of a rock is not a landscape photo. Any focal length can ...


18

There is overlap between the two terms, as you'll see as you browse the lists of both at LensHero. Basically, they're two different directions from which to approach the problem of narrowing down lens choice, and the site offers both approaches. A wide angle lens has a specific definition without much flexibility — it's any lens with a wide field of view, ...


17

There are two issues at work that are causing your results to be a little soft: Diffraction Since you are using an EF-S lens it is safe to assume you are using a Canon APS-C camera. Most of the recent models have pixels pitches that cause diffraction to begin at around f/6.8-6.9. This is the point at which the affects of diffraction begin when viewed at the ...


17

Or am I misunderstanding how aperture works?...I thought the further away something is, the greater the depth of field. So when an object is three and a half miles away, it's going to have a huge depth of field! You're not wrong about that, but landscape photography often involves more than just photographing very distant objects. You often have objects at ...


16

There's been some really excellent answers already but let me provide some additional pointers from a beginner point of view. Learn the technical part. You've bought a DSLR so learn to use it properly. If you were only worried about composition and you're going to shoot on auto then you may as well have bought a point & shoot camera. Learn to expose ...


16

How can I make my shots look like this one? I added an emphasis to the question you asked, which is pretty much the answer: You make an image like that. There's no way your camera will produce an image like that directly. No matter what settings you dial in. You have to apply some heavy post processing to get an image like that, the steps are usually: The ...


15

The rule of thumb is you can hand hold a 50mm lens at 1/50th second, or a 100mm at 1/100th second and have reasonable lack of camera shake. VR extends that a few stops. So it depends on the amount of light. In bright sunlight, at f/16 and a 35mm lens, you wouldn't need a tripod or VR. In low light, VR won't be enough, you'll need a tripod In between ...


15

Here's a few methods I'm aware of: Circular Polariser filter A lot of the light from the sky is polarised during the day, so a simple CP filter can drastically cut down the amount of light you get, so that it doesn't blow out. You also get a lot of polarised reflections from vegetation and water, so this can cut glare and improve contrast throughout the ...


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