100

Rockwell presents his opinion as fact even when it is actually a contested opinion. Yes, professionals use 24-70 lenses. They aren't for every situation, but there are plenty where they are great go to lenses. The Canon 24-70 f/2.8 II, for example, is one of the most popular zoom lenses ever. I do wedding photography and during the reception, the 24-70 ...


41

If you shoot from the same position with both lenses, then taking the 35mm lens and cropping it to the same angle of view of the 50mm lens will give you pretty much the same picture, other than the differences in optical quality between the two lenses and the resolution lost to cropping. But even if you were to shoot with the same lens, shooting from a ...


40

Those are done using the compression of a telephoto lens. Longer lenses will magnify the subject, so will make the moon look bigger. It will also make buildings and other objects bigger, but by moving yourself further away from those earthbound objects you can reduce them back to a smaller size. But you can't really get further away from the moon, so it ...


33

You're right that the angle of view of the iPhone camera is a little bit wider than a 35mm lens on a full-frame film camera. Up until this point, you're not really confused. But the part after that, about the small room and zoom and distance — definitely confused. :) "Zoom" means the ability to change the field of view — it isn't magnification. See What is ...


31

You are not required to purchase any lenses at all. It all depends on your photography needs and what you're willing to spend your money on. Regarding range, the superzoom 18-200 mm covers the same range as the other four lenses you mentioned. All of the other lenses focal ranges are parts of the large range of the 18-200 mm lens. The 18-200 can surely ...


29

The answer to this question revolves around explaining how zoom lenses function because you are correct in your observation: As you zoom to higher and higher magnifications the image dims unless somehow compensation is applied. Suppose you zoom from 25mm to 50mm, should the working diameter of the aperture remain unchanged, image brightness would suffer a 4x ...


28

The flattening or compression effect is not caused by a particular kind of lens, it applies to all lens in the same way. Actually, this property of lenses applies to our own eyes as well. The factor that affects flattening is the distance from the camera to the subjects. Consider the following exercise: Place two friends 1 meter away from each other. ...


27

Do convex lenses make parallel light rays of different wavelength converge to different points? Yes. The separation of different wavelengths of light is called dispersion. Different wavelengths of light refract at different angles because the refractive index of a transparent medium is frequency dependent. We often describe different materials, such as ...


24

Oh, it is worse than that. Many lenses designed for still photography exhibit focus breathing, where the angle of view varies over the range of distances the lens can focus. Normally this isn't an issue for still photography, but lenses designed for cine use (video) will normally try to minimize focus breathing. Lenses, at their heart, are mass produced ...


23

Your friend is right that it is actually always a 24mm lens — that is a property of the optics and never changes. But, he's wrong in saying that the crop factor does not apply. That's a property of the sensor size of the camera. From a practical point of view, zoom — changing focal length — and cropping are interchangeable. So, using a camera with a smaller ...


23

Firstly, distance is used for focal length because it measures the distance between the plane of the lens and the point at which refracted rays meet at a point, when the incident rays were parallel. Below is a simple diagram of a single lens. Note: This is only for convex lenses. The use of millimetres is simply because it is a scale appropriate for this ...


21

The mirror lens design resolves two key optical problems: All lenses suffer from chromatic aberration. This is color fringing due to the failure of the lens to refract (bend inward) all colors of light accurately. In a conventional lens, this is accomplished by sandwiching two or more lenses, of different powers using different recipes for the glass. The ...


21

Light from a far distance object, like a star, arrive at the lens, as parallel rays. As they transverse the lens, they are forced to change their direction. They bend inward, we call this refraction from the Latin to bend backwards. We can draw a trace of these rays; they trace out the shape of a cone. What we find is, the apex of the violet cone of light ...


20

Pretty sure I answered this one before but I cannot find it. As focal-length gets longer, the angle of view gets smaller. With a smaller angle of view, rays forming the image are closer to being parallel. With less variation of angle between rays, light has to travel more before being sufficiently out of focus. This is a little oversimplified but I hope it ...


20

There is NO difference at ALL because the physical aperture has not changed. The Fuji Finepix S4000 simulates a small aperture using an ND filter. When you stop-down the ND filter slides into the optical path. The Aperture written in the EXIF data is adjusted to reflect the transmittance of the ND filter, but note that since the size of the opening has not ...


20

The entrance pupil is limited by the diameter of the front element, and that is what usually restricts the maximum aperture of telephoto zoom lenses - not the physical size of the aperture diaphragm. The physical size of the diaphragm is only part of what determines the maximum aperture, expressed as an f-number, of a lens. Magnification between the front ...


20

The effect is called field curvature. A good discussion comes from Nikon. It is a lens aberration that can reduce the resolution of the lens when coupled with a flat sensor. In the old days, the film could be bent a little to try to follow the image plane and reduce the effect, but our sensors today are rigid. It can be reduced with lens design.


20

The proof is in the pudding – the focal lengths are not exactly the same as yours, but the differences are obvious...


19

It depends on what you're asking exactly, if you're asking what focal length provides the same magnification as the naked eye (as in you hold your hand out infront of the camera and look through the viewfinder, your hand appears the same size as it would without the camera), then the answer depends on sensor size and viewfinder magnification, but the answer ...


19

Let's start with lenses at the same location, and then address the moving the longer lens farther away to get the same field of view. Lenses at the same location The 50mm f/1.4 lens has an effective aperture that's twice the diameter, and four times the area, of the 25mm f/1.4 lens. The 50mm will, therefore, collect four times as much light (four times as ...


18

I believe the effect has to do with the RATIO of distances from the camera to various parts of the subject / scene. For example, if you take a wide-angle shot of a person's face, their features are exaggerated because the camera-to-nose distance might be half of the camera-to-ear distance. On the other hand, consider the same shot taken with a telephoto ...


18

The easiest way to think of this is with an image. When you use a wider lens, you have to be closer to your subject, which emphasizes the distance between the subject and background by making the background smaller. In contrast, if the camera is far away from the subject, you'll have to zoom much farther to get the same size of subject relative to the ...


16

A normal lens is one who's focal-length is equal to the diagonal of the sensor or film. This is said to give a natural perspective similar to that of a single human eye. On a full-frame DSLR, it is usually a 50mm lens. On a cropped-sensor (APS-C) DSLR, a normal lens falls around 35mm but from 30 to 55mm, it would still be considered normal. For Four-Thirds ...


16

What you are seeing is the effect of viewfinder magnification. For whatever reason (probably simply to make the numbers sound better), this spec is usually given for a 50mm lens, even on APS-C. The Canon 60D, for example, has a 0.95x magnification with a 50mm lens focused at infinity. And that's why around 50mm gives you the magic double-vision effect. There'...


16

That depends on the sensor size of the camera. "A lens is considered to be a "normal lens", in terms of its angle of view on a camera, when its focal length is approximately equal to the diagonal dimension of the film format or image sensor format.[4] The resulting diagonal angle of view of about 53 degrees is often said to approximate the angle ...


16

When the engineers are designing a lens, the 70-300 is a target focal range they design to, but it's not important that they hit it exactly as long as it covers the advertised range. As they tweak the lens characteristics to get a suitably sharp and quality image for the target cost, the actual focal lengths may change slightly. Eventually, when everything ...


15

That difference is because the angle of view of the APS-C sensor is smaller than the 35mm Full frame sensor. Basically the change of focal length is only considered as a change of angle of view. APS-C sensor has a crop factor of 1.6 of the full frame sensor. ie Anything viewed with the APS-C sensor will be cropped 1.6 times the Full frame sensor.Hence 300x1....


15

The f-number is in use to express how much light a lens can capture, so the 85mm f/1.8 and 24mm f/1.8 can capture the same amount. Here, f is the focal length, and f/1.8 means that maximum aperture diameter is 47.2mm in first example and 13.3mm in second. What you have to consider here is that the 85mm lens has a much narrower field of view, therefore it ...


15

"What are the different types of macro lenses"? There are "Macro" lenses and there are Macro lenses. As others have mentioned, a true Macro lens will magnify the subject to a 1:1 ratio which is generally a desirable feature. Many lenses will be marketed as 'Macro' lenses even though they don't magnify down to 1:1 so be careful to check the actual ...


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