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16

I think if you look through pictures you'll find quite a bit of difference, but I suspect much of it is illusory. Specifically, you'll almost certainly find more pictures of really spectacular sunsets than sunrises. I'm not at all convinced that this is because an average sunset is more spectacular though -- it's a simple matter of the number of pictures ...


11

The Photographer's Ephemeris is a great software package to get started with these sorts of calculations. There is a free desktop version that you can use at home before your trip, and if it turns out to be really helpful, there are paid versions available for iOS and Android. This tool lets you mark a spot on a map and then calculate sunrise, sunset, ...


8

Since most visitors come to New York City and refer to it as New York, I will base my answers on the assumption you mean New York City (we can be pedantic around here :) ). Manhattan Island runs lengthwise essentially Northeast to Southwest, such that if one were standing in Midtown (say Times Square), sunrise would occur roughly east of Central Park ...


7

From my (family's) observations, generally sunsets have a larger spread of light. Also sunsets have more colour depth. For example: Sunrise (from Wikipedia) Sunset (from wikipedia) This is from our own observations, NOT from any documented sources.


6

Most P&S I have used does amazing jobs with the built-in presets (Scene modes)! Though most people think the presets are targeted towards amateurs, but trust me they are not! The companies have invested heavy amount of research and money to configure these presets often using real life feedback from very experienced photographers. So I'd not ...


6

At the equator, you would get 1 minute extra sun at either end of the day per 1.5km of altitude, according to this page. Using trigonometry, for every degree north or south you travel, the extra time the sun would stay above the horizon (per 1.5km altitude) would be (1/cos (latitude)) * 1 minute per 1.5km, giving the following values: 10° : 1.02 min = 1 ...


6

Noise is only peripherally about ISO. What really determines noise is the Signal-to-Noise Ratio. The reason we assume high ISO is noisier is because we normally use high ISO when the signal (the amount of light falling on the sensor) is weak. But shooting at high ISO when there is plenty of light in a scene will produce less noise than shooting at low ISO ...


6

It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to tell at times. Here's a list a strategies I might use to tell the difference: Look for contextual clues. Even a tiny recognizable feature could reveal the cardinal direction. Atmospheric clarity. During a sunrise, the dust has had time to settle at night, making the sky clearer than at sunset, where there is a ...


5

In low light on a phone camera with little in the way of user-adjustment, your primary objective is to keep the camera still. Find a wall you can rest it on, & if possible use a delay timer, so you're not actually holding the phone as the picture is taken. If there is nothing suitable to rest the phone on find a wall/fence/tree to lean against. Keep ...


4

You can also use a free tool that I've developed with a colleague. It computes the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The example in the image is for Chamonix in France. Go to suncurves.com to find your own location. Hope you like it! I'm using it for all my outdoor shoots.


4

The Photographer's Ephemeris (http://photoephemeris.com/). The desktop version is a web app, and they also have iOS and Android versions. I plan every 'proper' shoot I do with it.


4

A circular polariser filter will reduce reflections from the surface of the water, making it appear clear. Here a good example of this:


4

I just got a new camera, a Canon EOS Rebel xti Congratulations! New gear is always exciting. ;-) Also, welcome to Photo.SE. I am still learning what it can do. First thing to do: Read the manual. I know that sounds obvious and maybe condescending, but I get the strong impression that lots of people never read the manual when they get a new camera. I'll ...


4

As mentioned in comments, it's lens flare, caused by the sunlight just managing to hit the lens, even with your lens hood on. Exacerbated by the HDR process. You might not notice it as you're taking the shot, but if you wave your hand in front, above & to the side & see if you can spot any point where it changes the light balance in the viewfinder ...


3

I've found Sol to be not only an excellent sunset/sunrise app, but it looks great too and I like the visual representation of the length of the day. Sol also has relative alarms that will alert you X minutes prior to a sun event (sunset, Golden Hour, etc). It can also be set to adjust for your location if you travel. Also check out SunCalc - it's not ...


3

The simplest way to do what you want it to make HDR. Bracket several exposures with +-1 or +-2 stops then use software to combine in single image with light and dark areas exposed closest to your vision. In such very high contrast scenes this can help a lot. Of course you can try with single RAW file and try to compress high contrast to acceptable level. ...


3

First of all you need to understand the concept of "dynamic range". (Maybe you do, I don't know) The dr is the ability of your camera to render as much darktones and highlights at the same time. Have a look about this concept on youtube. You have to be aware that the human eye has the hability to render a better DR than most of digital cameras. On average, ...


2

Sunsets vary greatly as I'm sure you know! Sometimes just being in the right place at the right time can help but you help yourself here sometimes. Luckily we live in a time of digital and you can see what you took instantly so just tweak from there. Start with a base exposure then slowly underexpose or expose as bright as you can then develop the rest ...


2

Not for mobile yet, but you can also use a free tool that I've developed with a colleague. It computes the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The example in the image is for Chamonix in France. Go to suncurves.com to find your own location. Hope you like it! I'm using it for all my outdoor shoots.


2

I use SunCalc. Probably one of the prettier browser based ones out there.


2

Yes, there is a form of spectrum distortion: At sunset the light from the sun has to pass through more atmosphere, which scatters the light, but this scattering effect is strong the higher the wavelength of light, therefore the blue end of the spectrum is scattered a lot more than the red, therefore the red end of the spectrum remains stronger at sunset ...


1

There might be an answer to your question now. With the release of TPE 3D, you can see the shadows and lights in the 3 dimensional world. Of course, this will not show you additional obstacles like buildings, trees.


1

Outside, the street is evenly illuminated by the light coming from the sun, but once that lights goes through your window it behaves as any other light point, and its intensity falls proportionally to the traversed distance. If we see the scene evenly lighted is because our eyes are fastly adapting to the brightness inside and outside the window, which our ...


1

If you want the clouds to be in your photograph, check cloud coverage for where you want the clouds to be. This may be between you and the mountains, directly over the mountains, or beyond the mountains. Cloud coverage over the camera is unlikely to appear in frame unless you are pointing the camera straight up. If you have some other reason for wanting ...


1

The moon can be tricky since cameras will meter for the moon and all the black sky around it. This will fool the cameras lightmeter. Since the same sun falls on the moon as on the earth, the basic starting point would be 1/ISO @ f/16. Usually the density of the air surrounding the earth and any particulate in it will require you to increase the exposure ...


1

I live in a place where I get to see and film sunrises over the Cascade mountains, and I like to make timelapse movies of those sunrises. After a lot of experimentation I have found that setting the meter exposure down two notches really helps to capture the color. I set the aperture somewhere between F22 and F16 depending on the lense, the light and how ...


1

First some notes about dynamic range. Timelapses of sunrises or sunsets are tricky because of the huge dynamic range that you can capture. My (unscientific) tests showed me that capturing smooth gradients of the sky as well as details in the shadows would require a camera with 20 stops of dynamic range or more. This camera doesn't exist. But worse, your ...


1

I find the following websites to be useful: Calculation of sun’s position in the sky for each location on the earth at any time of day Twilight Calculator - "Blue Hour / Golden Hour Table" The first is aimed more towards solar panel installation than photography, but gives information about sun angle that the second, more popular site doesn't...


1

AFAIK, if there is a body of water in the picture, it would be more still during sunrise than sunset because the cooler temperatures of the night results in less wind. From Scott Kelby's, The Digital Photography Book (the first) Another advantage of shooting at dawn (rather than at sunset) is that water (in ponds, lakes, bays, etc.) is more still at ...


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