16

Golden hour is when the sun is low in the horizon, giving light with a golden tint. Blue hour is when the sun is slightly below the horizon, leaving the sky deep blue. There is no set duration because it varies according to latitude and time of the year. Civil twilight is a good approximation with the sun being ±6° around the horizon. When the angle is ...


7

If anyone is interested, my colleague and I have developed a free tool for computing the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The image in the example is for Chamonix in France. I'm a photographer myself, and that was one of the reasons why we made this. Very useful when going on a shoot. Just go to suncurves....


7

The example shot looks like it's suffering from two main issues. White balance is coming out very much on the blue side. When we think of 'sunny' we think of 'warm'. Humans equate orange with warm & blue with cold. It's over-exposed. The camera was presumably thinking the tree was the main subject & tried to deal with that. Unfortunately, cameras ...


6

You need to shoot at either sunrise or set (sunset is generally warmer in tone), when the sun is very low in the sky. Shoot with the sun behind the model (taking care not to look directly at it if possible). As you are shooting into the sun, you need some light source to light the front of your model: this could either be a diffused flash or a reflector. As ...


5

Iceland is so far north that depending where you are in the country, you get significantly different results. Compare the following chart from gaisma.com for Reykjavík, which is in the south: With this chart, for Ísafjörður in the north: As you can see, between mid June and the beginning of July, the sun never actually sets in the north of Iceland, however ...


4

Lens bloom occurs due to light bending around a backlit object/subject. The distant trees are not backlit. Lens flare is caused by hard light directly hitting the lens elements, and looks different. The lens is in the shade. Increased contrast is the opposite of the issue here. Light does not have a resonance frequency as such. Objects have a resonance ...


4

I moved to Denver from Phoenix, and there is no doubt that the quality of light during the golden hour is greatly affected by the mountains. It varies depending on where in Denver you are and the time of year, but we lose much of the benefit of the setting sun's golden hour here. In the example above, there is a picture of nicely illuminated clouds, which ...


4

On Android there's a great app called Sun Surveyor. This will tell you sunrise/set/golden/blue times, as others do. But it's got the map view (as shown elsewhere), and another unique feature, which is an "augmented reality" view where you hold your phone up, and it uses the camera to overlay on the real scenery the path that the sun is going to take during ...


4

You have several effects in mountains: When the sun is behind the mountain, your scene is lit only by blue sky, and by reflection of sunlight from peaks. Late in the day there is very little light reflected from peaks, even though the sun may be 1-2 hours from sunset. Your lighting is bright blue sky. This light has less red in it than a similar period ...


4

The Photographer's Ephemeris (http://photoephemeris.com/). The desktop version is a web app, and they also have iOS and Android versions. I plan every 'proper' shoot I do with it.


3

There's a bit of post production going on in that image that is probably clouding things somewhat. If you look at the area at the top of the image it's clearly been blown out (overexposed) and then brought back from pure white to a dirty grey pink colour. This says to me two things - the contrast of the image has been lowered so that the blacks and whites ...


3

I've found Sol to be not only an excellent sunset/sunrise app, but it looks great too and I like the visual representation of the length of the day. Sol also has relative alarms that will alert you X minutes prior to a sun event (sunset, Golden Hour, etc). It can also be set to adjust for your location if you travel. Also check out SunCalc - it's not ...


2

As one of the developers, I feel compelled to tell you about our photography app, GoldenPic. GoldenPic doesn't just give you the sunrise and sunset, it also provides you the blue and golden hours, moon phase, moonrise and moonset times, weather, GPS coordinates, etc. It even lets you save your GPS coordinates to recall at a later day/time and integrates ...


2

Not for mobile yet, but you can also use a free tool that I've developed with a colleague. It computes the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The example in the image is for Chamonix in France. Go to suncurves.com to find your own location. Hope you like it! I'm using it for all my outdoor shoots.


2

Here is a screenshot from TPE. Normally this would show the following: Sunset - the time the sun sets Civil twilight - defined as when the sun is below the horizon, less than 6 degrees - brightest stars and planets visible Nautical twilight - defined as when the sun is between 6 and 12 degrees below the horizon - many more stars visible Astronomical ...


2

I use SunCalc. Probably one of the prettier browser based ones out there.


1

I find the following websites to be useful: Calculation of sun’s position in the sky for each location on the earth at any time of day Twilight Calculator - "Blue Hour / Golden Hour Table" The first is aimed more towards solar panel installation than photography, but gives information about sun angle that the second, more popular site doesn't...


1

I'd say those photos you linked to were HDR's for sure -- given the tonal range between the land and the sky. Additionally the first one with the flowing water was done with an ND filter to slow down the light coming into the lens, resulting in a longer exposure time. Very nice photos though :-)


1

I've made an app for Windows Phone 7/8 called Sun Tracker, which would cover more recent Nokia handsets. It includes some of the requested features: Sunrise, Sunset and Twilight times Augmented Reality Sun Position Tracking using phones latitude and longitude


1

On the iPhone there is a great application called Star Walk that shows you elevation and sunrise/sunset times, either for your current location or a location you pick from the globe. It also shows you rise/set times of the visible planets and the moon. As a bonus in this case (and the main feature of the app in general) it gives you a great map of the night ...


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