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120

TL:DR Do primary colors really exist in the real world? No. There are no primary colors of light, in fact there is no color intrinsic in light at all (or any other wavelength of electromagnetic radiation). There are only colors in the perception of certain wavelengths of EMR by our eye/brain systems. Or did we select red, green, and blue because ...


49

This is called a color cast. As others have said, it is a result of an incorrect white-balance. Your camera is assuming that light is of a different color than it is and is compensating for that, resulting in a color cast. It can happen with any camera. Some Automatic White-Balance systems are better than others. A long time ago, some cameras had dedicated ...


45

The goal of the imaging engineer has always been to capture with the camera a faithful image of the outside world and present that image in such a way that the observer sees true to life picture. This goal has never been achieved. In fact the best images made today are frail. If this goal were to be achieved, you would need sunglasses to comfortably view an ...


40

I'm going to give two answers which appear to be in conflict but which actually aren't: There are dark yellows and bright violets — we're just not used to seeing them. There aren't and can't be dark yellows or bright violets — and here's why. OK... 1. There are dark yellows and bright violets Color perception is relative. Here is a demonstration. If you ...


38

but why i can see little bit of orange color with shutter speed 1/400 ? My best guess is that you had the camera set to automatic white balance (AWB). In the 1/200s shot, the moon was bright enough to easily be the brightest thing in the frame, and the white balance algorithm decided that that object was most likely to be white. In the 1/400s shot the ...


35

It is related to a heated substance, albeit in a somewhat theoretical way. The substance is an ideal incandescent black body, which would radiate a given color within a given color space at a given temperature. The location within the color space vs. temperature is called the Planckian locus, and I don't claim to understand everything in that article, but ...


35

You said, this is the information that is captured at first by digital cameras. That is not correct. By themselves, sensors on most digital cameras respond to a broad band of frequencies of light, beyond what humans can see into the infrared and ultraviolet spectrum. Because sensors capture such a broad spectrum of light, they are terrible discriminators ...


32

Why don't cameras offer more than 3 colour channels? It costs more to produce (producing more than one kind of anything costs more) and gives next to no (marketable) advantages over Bayer CFA. (Or do they?) They did. Several cameras including retailed ones had RGBW (RGB+White) RGBE (RGB+Emerald), CYGM (Cyan Yellow Green Magenta) or CYYM (Cyan Yellow ...


32

"Better image quality." You use that phrase. When we say image quality in reference to comparing two lenses, we rarely are talking about anything with regard to which one is "... less dark and gives more vivid colors."¹ Those things are more a function of the light in the scene, the photographer's skill at seeing that light and capturing it while also ...


28

The trick is very easy, actually: bring your own lighting. The existing orange sodium-vapor lighting is missing important parts of color spectrum, so those colors will never be reflected from anything. Filtering will only further reduce the colors available for recording. The "good" examples in the question look very much like one would get with a couple ...


26

The question is whether the colors and tones are okay; this is clearly very subjective, and the answer for many people is a shrug and a "sure". But this is your image, and you're the artist, so the question is: does it match your intent? Are you happy with it? Does it communicate what you want to communicate? And, without more information from you, we can'...


26

Wikipedia's introductory statement on color temperature relates them quite well: The color temperature of a light source is the temperature of an ideal black-body radiator that radiates light of comparable hue to that of the light source. Black body radiators are an idealized concept, that radiate an energy spectrum with a peak intensity at a frequency ...


25

I think "several fluorescent fixtures that I use to light my studio" is the key here. I'm guessing that the very high ISOs are accompanied by very short shutter speeds. Fluorescent lights cycle, and there are color variations within the cycle. Repeat your test with incandescent light or sunlight (or a strobe with high-speed sync). See Do fluorescent ...


25

What is going on? I compared both pictures of the field (left out the one with the tractor, as it suffers from the same problem as the other over-exposed picture, IMHO) in After effects. The image above is a composition of all that I did: First, the composition of both your original images that I made in AE (white canvas added only here), then both ...


25

We ended up with RGB because they're a reasonable match to the way the three types of cones in our eyes work. But there's no particularly privileged set of wavelength choices for Red, Green, and Blue. As long as you pick wavelengths that are a good fit for one set of cones each, you can mix them to create a wide range of colours. The way colours are ...


22

The type of lighting, the way the subject reflects light, presence of haze, the lens design and coatings and the dyes used in the sensor all have an influence on the vividness of colours in an image. But the major factor, which outweighs all of these by a significant margin, is how the image is processed. Either in camera or on a PC the saturation settings ...


21

There's really no such thing as an "unaltered" photograph. Unless you're going to pin a piece of undeveloped film to the wall. Certain film stock is designed to give exaggerated colours and there are film processing techniques (e.g. cross processing) to do the same. A digital camera cannot detect colour directly, only intensity. Sensors have a mosaic of ...


21

sRGB is a color-space developed by HP and Microsoft in 1996. CRT monitors were common and therefore sRGB was based on the characteristics of these monitors' capabilities. A good write-up of the history and reasons can be found here. The chromaticity coordinates and available colors were chosen on what the phosphors used in CRTs could produce back then. ...


21

More than a comment, less than an answer, because I have no clue what camera/lens/film... The car's registration plate sets it firmly between August 77 & July 78 - the letter is the year for old UK plates S=77 Ref: http://www.theaa.com/car-buying/number-plates There's prestige in having a 'new' plate, so there's a high probability this was even shot ...


20

This is an observation made by many when they start to shoot in raw after being used to JPEG. You have to understand that what you see with a raw image is exactly what came off the sensor when you took the picture. Digital cameras provide all kinds of on board post processing such as noise reduction, sharpening, saturation and contrast settings which are ...


20

Yes, if you shoot RAW. If you have difficulty visualizing an image in B&W, shooting in B&W gives you a good approximation of the final image at the time of shooting so you can adjust; many digital cameras can even process B&W with color filters, so if you have a particular type of processing in mind, such as using a red filter to darken skies (...


20

Well, in order to get good results, you'll have to make the plunge into non-auto settings. I'd recommend Manual mode. The problem you're running into here is that you are pointing your camera at a bird in the sky, which is bright. Camera meters are set up to try and make every exposure a uniform grey in terms of brightness. So if you point your camera at ...


19

First, a little background to clear up a slight misunderstanding on your part. The vast majority of color digital cameras have a Bayer filter that masks each pixel with a color filter: Red, Green, or Blue.¹ The RAW data does not include any color information, but only a luminance value for each pixel. However, RGB filters necessarily cut out two thirds ...


18

The reason is that the red light is a light source, therefore it's much brighter than any other parts of the scene. The pixels showing it are overblown - meaning there was more light coming than your camera sensor could capture. The light is not pure red, it emits enough green and blue light to blow these color channels of pixels too. The hood is just ...


18

What you are seeing is Infra-Red (AKA 'IR') The sensor (probably) has an IR filter, but strong sources such as fire can still get through, and show up as a light purple on most CCD / CMOS sensors.


17

This is a difficult problem as in general those orange sodium vapour lamps give you little to work with, but there are some options Lighting varies with location, it's probably the case that the lighting in the second two examples was better (more sources, broader spectrum), so move around and compare results. By careful editing you can sometimes get a good ...


17

The colour temperature is related to the black-body radiation produced by hot objects. The black-body radiation curve, shown below, shows the approximate intensity* curves at each wavelength for the radiation emitted by bodies at 5000K, 4000K and 3000K. * It actually shows the spectral radiance curve, which is a kind of flux. But you can think of it as an ...


16

You can use the Magic Wand Tool with the following setting: Tolerance: 0 Anti-alias: unchecked Contiguous: unchecked Sample All Layers: *checked or unchecked* (See below) The Magic Wand Tool also uses the "Sample Size" settings from the Eye Dropper tool, so you will have to switch to that tool and make sure it is set to "Point Sample" before using the ...


16

My monitor is calibrated (less than a month ago). I see the white/gold dress, but the highlights on the white piping have a blue tinge to me. However I have seen pics of the (supposedly) original dress, and it is a deep blue and black. To me, the only way I can reconcile this pic, and the pic of the actual dress is that if this pic was taken with a really ...


16

How can I make my shots look like this one? I added an emphasis to the question you asked, which is pretty much the answer: You make an image like that. There's no way your camera will produce an image like that directly. No matter what settings you dial in. You have to apply some heavy post processing to get an image like that, the steps are usually: The ...


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