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40

Those are done using the compression of a telephoto lens. Longer lenses will magnify the subject, so will make the moon look bigger. It will also make buildings and other objects bigger, but by moving yourself further away from those earthbound objects you can reduce them back to a smaller size. But you can't really get further away from the moon, so it ...


38

but why i can see little bit of orange color with shutter speed 1/400 ? My best guess is that you had the camera set to automatic white balance (AWB). In the 1/200s shot, the moon was bright enough to easily be the brightest thing in the frame, and the white balance algorithm decided that that object was most likely to be white. In the 1/400s shot the ...


34

What makes the difference on partially and fully visible moon? In a word: shadows. I cannot understand why the IQ is extremely diminished when doing the same with an almost fully visible moon. The second image does appear to suffer from lower sharpness and overall quality. However, even if the technical image quality factors were equal, most importantly,...


30

I had exactly the same problem when I first tried to photograph the moon: all I ever got was an overexposed white circle. The answer is that the moon is much brighter than you realise. Also, unless you have a very telescopic lens, it's going to be pretty small in your photo. If you use one of the camera's automatic modes, the camera will try to get the "...


22

I have taken a few years to perfect my moon shots. Many nights stood out in the cold!! On the months where the full moon is not obscured by cloud!! Here is what I do: You need a long lens! The moon may look large in the sky, but it will still be a dot in your viewfinder! Here is one instance where megapixels still count - as for the same reason above ...


17

The "ray" effect is known as sunstar. There are 2 conditions to achieve sunstars : use a narrow aperture (like f/16). point camera to small and bright light source. You achieved that effect very well. However, it doesn't serve the photograph. In the photo, the subject seems to be the moon. However, it is hard to tell it is the moon by looking at it only. ...


16

Your exposure settings will grossly overexpose the moon. Remember, the illuminated parts of the moon are in direct sunlight! Allowing for the moon's albedo, start with about ISO 200, f/8, and 1/125 second or equivalent. Similar to the 'Sunny 16' rule of thumb, the 'Lunar 11' rule of thumb says to use a shutter time of 1/ISO with f/11. In reality, about one-...


15

I can't speak for all manufacturers, but can answer your point 2. Canon does. Their higher end models on the top mode wheel (e.g. auto, P, aperture priority/shutter speed priority and manual etc), also have from one to three C modes. These allow you to register and save settings, be it shooting mode (manual, aperture priority etc) down to their relevant ...


13

Assuming both lenses are being used on the same size sensor, the area in the frame with a 600mm lens should be one quarter the area in the frame with a 300mm lens. The linear dimensions should change by a factor of two, the areal dimensions should change by a factor of the square of two, which is four. If you are not seeing the same object shot from the ...


12

If "to get good shadows" he means shadows cast by surface features on the moon, thats entirely a matter of opinion. The moon has dozens of faces, from thin crescents, normal crescents, half moons, gibbous moons, full moons for both waxing and waning, as well as eclipsed moons. I've shot the moon a lot myself, and I can't say there is any "right time". Its ...


12

You found the image at Mansurov's How to Photograph the Moon, so I think that's a good place to look for answers. Since he suggests using a 300mm lens and 1.4x or 2x teleconverter, I would bet those were used. Additionally, he also mentions that regardless of focal length, you are likely going to want to crop to get a tight photo.


12

Some possible reasons, arranged in the likely order of influence, for the lack of clarity in the example photo: 1) The optical limits of your lens. The EF 100-300mm f/4.5-5.6 was released as a budget telephoto zoom lens in 1990 at the dawn of the EOS era. Compared to the current EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 STM, at the longest focal lengths and widest apertures ...


11

It is worth mentioning the 'moon illusion' as well. The moon will look big to the human eye when close to the horizon but it is an illusion - try a photograph and see it 'shrink' to it's proper size. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon_illusion And as a direct answer to your questions, long lens and careful placement of foreground interest.


11

I agree with what Hermann said, but have a different answer as to how to avoid this. Expose properly. Notice that the blue smudge is much dimmer than the moon, which is so bright that it is totally blown out and even has a quite visible halo around it. Some of that may be caused by atmospheric effects, but I also suspect blooming due to extreme over ...


11

With an image like this, the best and easiest solution is probably manual exposure fusion. It's easy enough to do in any raster graphics editor (GIMP, Photoshop, etc.). For example, here's what I managed to produce from your original images in a few minutes in GIMP: Here are the steps I used: Open both images as layers in GIMP, with the darker image (...


11

The best method I have found is to shoot the moon when there is still enough light in the sky to narrow the dynamic range between the Moon's surface and the surrounding sky. A moon just a little past new can be shot shortly after sunset and exposed so that details are visible from the earthshine reflecting from the dark part of the new moon. Shooting an ...


11

I have found these lens Nikon AF 70-300mm f/4-5.6G in a very good price. I am planning to use them mainly to take pictures of the moon. I am aware that this lens does not have image stabilisation. Is this a major drawback ? If you plan on shooting a full moon on a clear night, handheld, it shouldn't be, because you can easily get shutter speeds faster than ...


11

It looks like lens flare. It is an internal reflection inside the lens. It is caused by off axis light allowed to fall on the front surface if the lens from outside the field of view. For an example of such flare when the exposure is brightened please see: Can you photograph the milky way with a full moon out? It might also be sunlight reflecting off dust ...


10

For dark places you can turn off autofocus and use manual focusing. That works for focusing using the ring on the lens. To get very precise you do it after pressing the LV button. This shows the image on screen bigger. To get manual focus, press the [i] button and change AF-S (or AF-C) to MF. The lens for shooting only the moon is too short but if you want ...


9

The light from such objects is nowhere near bright enough to cause damage to the sensor, however using really long exposures to capture dim distant stars could damage the sensor by overheating. Most modern DSLRs have heat sensors and cutoffs to prevent this, but if you're using an older camera and keeping the shutter open for hours with an external power ...


9

Here is a simple how-to guide for attaching your DSLR to a telescope. With photos, and links to external information on related topics. tl;dr: You need a T-ring (or T-mount) to adapt your DSLR to the T-adapter, which slides into the telescope in place of the regular eyepiece. As you are going to be taking photos of vary distant objects with long exposures,...


9

The best time to shoot the supermoon is when you can really show off it's size. Shot solo, up alone in the sky, a supermoon doesn't look any different than any other moon. It lacks any dramatic comparisons to other objects of well-known size. You want to shoot a supermoon when it is lower in the atmosphere, and in proximity to foreground object, with the ...


9

The best time to shoot Earthshine is when the Moon is practically new, because the illuminated portion of the Moon's arc must be completely and utterly blown out in order to capture detail in the part of the Moon not illuminated by the Sun. You will need to use a tripod and cable release. Mirror lock up may not be a necessity depending on your shutter ...


9

I bracketed mine between iso 800 - 1600 to be safe. I was using a Canon 650D (crop sensor) with a 55-250mm STM lens on a tripod. My favorite picture ended up being at iso 1600 @ 1/2 second. Since the lens I was using isn't very sharp @ 250mm I figured I could get away with the slow shutter speed. I set my color balance for daylight and cropped in. Going ...


8

Like comedy, it's in the timing. Shoot earlier in the day. This was taken in Southern California in December around 5:00pm. Moon. Blue sky. No need for HDR or exposure fusion or masks and layers. The moon is a very bright directly-sun-lit object. Treat accordingly. Canon XT/350D. EF 400mm f/5.6L USM. iso 100, f/11, 1/20s. Tripod and cable release.


8

The moon is a fairly easy object to photograph. There are a few things that are helpful to know up front. As no specific lens example or photographic example was offered, I can only offer general thoughts based on many of the sample photos that I've seen from those who are new to astrophotography (specifically lunar imaging). Experience Everyone starts ...


8

Opening your aperture fully, so the actual aperture opening is circular, will get rid of the sunstars - but can give just too much of a halo (even more with a fast prime lens than with a small zoom!). The optimal choice of lens for your intent would be one that maintains a very near circular aperture no matter what aperture setting you choose - such will be ...


7

Space is really REALLY big and that has an amazing impact on angular momentum. Think about the sun in the sky. We're on a ball of rock that is moving at 67,000 mph and spinning at around 1000 miles per hour, but yet the sun crawls across the sky. The reason is because that while the speeds may be very high, the distance is even higher. At very long ...


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