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44

It looks like a multi-image, aka kaleidoscope filter - specifically a Cokin #201 - I can't tell whether it's an A or a P; they're the same but different sizes. I can't find any reference to it any more on Cokin, apparently it's long out of production, but I can find many on eBay searching just 'cokin 201' - examples This is the box artwork, as an example ...


31

No, changing the exposure or using an ND filter will not help you with this, since both will only brighten or darken everything by a certain factor. Your problem is the large relative difference between the bright and dark parts, the dynamic range. And your eyes can capture a much larger dynamic range than the camera's sensor. In order to have a photo ...


30

Pardon me while I get a little metaphysical for a bit. "Color" as we understand it isn't a real property of anything in the universe. It's something created by our vision system — a complicated interaction in our eyes and brains. It's useful for things like "don't eat the poison berries", "look at that tiger over in the grass", and, more recently, "stopping ...


29

The answer will be easy to figure out if you understand a little bit what polarization means. I don't have a polarizing filter to play with, but I do have a physics degree, so here it goes: Light reflected by certain types of surfaces (such as glass or water, but not metal) is partially linearly polarized. Light reflected under a certain angle is fully ...


29

You've got the sun almost in the frame. This is causing huge amounts of veiling flare — light bouncing all around, reducing contrast. You'll get better results from a different angle, or at a different time of day. Did you have a lens hood? If so, positioning the camera so the hood can better do its job would help. And, yeah, it probably isn't doing you any ...


28

Your intuition is essentially correct but there are a few important points. When the lens is stopped right down, only light heading for the centre of the front element will make it into the picture, so the whole front element isn't used for every point of light hitting the sensor (though all of it is used for some point of light). Even when the aperture ...


28

I have the same lens. Your front element is not broken From your photo it looks like only a protective filter (UV?) broke. Notice the letters saying "16-35mm". They are printed on the outside of the lens, not behind the front element. It appears the filter mount ring is still attached, making the front of the lens look a little deeper than normal. ...


27

I carry a jar lid gripper around in my kit which has always done the trick for me when I need a little extra, well, grip. The other 'trick' that I have learned over the years is that most people's default reaction to a stuck filter is to get a really good grip on the filter and just try to torque it off. The problem with this approach is that the filter ...


27

A Neutral Density (ND) filter is a filter that reduces the amount of light captured by the camera evenly across the visible spectrum. As such, it looks grey to black (depending on the filtration power) and does not cast color on the received image (like blue or yellow, e.g., filters will do). When using a ND filter, there is a need to compensate for the ...


25

What you are looking for is a ND (Neutral Density) filter. To illustrate, here is an example of a photo taken in daylight in a street with a ND1000 filter. The filter allowed a shutter speed of 6 seconds. With no filter, with the same aperture and ISO, the shutter speed would have been approximately 6/1000 = 0.006 seconds (no "ghosts" effect). Contrary to ...


24

Filter Types There are essentially 3 kinds of GND filter: Soft, Hard, and Sunrise/Set. All these come in various 'strengths'. Soft GND filters have a gentle gradient from dark to transparent and so are good for landscapes with irregular horizons such as mountains, hills and to some extent buildings. Hard GND filters have a more sudden change between dark ...


24

Firstly, what is a neutral density filter? "Neutral density" just means that the filter is a pure shade of grey: it shouldn't (if well manufactured) add any colour tint to your photographs. There are two main types of neutral density (ND) filters: graduated and non-graduated. Graduated ND filters are darker at one edge and lighter (usually completely clear)...


22

When light bounces off a relatively nonconductive surface it becomes partially plane polarized, meaning the light tends to have the same polarization direction. Polarizing filters can be used to counteract glare/reflections, by orienting the filter at 90 degrees to the polarized reflection so that it get filtered out. If you orient the filter so that it is ...


21

What's the difference between “Fake HDR” and real, bracketed exposure HDR? The only difference is how broadly or narrowly you decide to define the term High Dynamic Range Imaging (HDR). Do you use the broader term as it has been historically used for over 150 years to reference techniques used to display a scene with higher dynamic range than the dynamic ...


20

There are two ways to simulate a Graduated ND filter by software and they both have different disadvantages and advantages, compared to an physical filter: H/W Filter Pro: A H/W filer gives you results immediately which you can see while you compose. Con: On the other hand, the effect is fixed in gradation and shape. Software Effect Pro: Adjustable in ...


20

You can merge multiple short exposure photos into a single long exposure image. There are a lot of tutorials on the net, for example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nAuQWfS3pLg Basically, he opens the sequence of photos in photoshop as layers in a single picture, then "auto-align layers", "convert to smart object" and "stack mode" - "mean". Image ...


19

No. It is not possible to create a physical filter that can completely "De-saturate" incoming light. The only way to achieve this without post-processing is at the film / sensor level.


19

You're probably comparing a linear polariser with a circular polariser. The linear polariser is a basic filter that only passes light waves polarised in a particular direction. That works either way round, and you can combine two of them to produce a variable density filter - by rotating the second polariser, it passes most of the light when the polarisation ...


18

that purple haze is probably a color cast caused by the glass itself; the welders glass often isn't neutral color. you should be looking at solar filters, or very dark (and probably stacked) ND filters. Thousand Oaks sells solar filters, to name one company.


18

You need more than an ND filter and a polarizer. You need a solar filter specifically designed for imaging the sun. The danger to your eyes and camera are very real if you are pointing the unprotected or underprotected camera at the sun. Most ND filters and polarizers only block visible light. The sun emits very high levels of UV and infrared radiation as ...


17

If the rubber band or filter wrench doesn't work, the next step is a precision band saw. If Adam Savage (the guy in the video) and his band saw is not available, you could also use a needle file or hacksaw to create a couple of notches in the front of the filter ring. Once you've cut a couple of notches in the filter ring, you can use a steel rule to twist ...


16

If you're out and about and this happens then carry a couple of elastic bands! These allow you to get a proper grip on the slim sides of the filter so you can remove it. Often they are stuck not because they are jammed on but because you cannot get enough of a grip to apply enough pressure to start turning them. A very simply, cheap, and more importantly ...


16

All color is a result of software processing. The only thing a sensor, be it film or semiconductor, can do is change state in response to incoming photons. Yes, a digital camera has color filters, but all they do is restrict the wavelengths which are passed to the sensing pixels. The output of each pixel is simply a bunch of electrons, which are then ...


15

The filter doesn't protect against dust getting "into" the lens, it just protects the front element. So the arguments for a filter are equally valid for zooms and primes. Personally I don't use them, as they have a negative impact on image quality. Always keeping you lens hood on is another way to protect the front element. Also, I recently damaged my lens ...


15

Absolutely you can. Many square filter holders are specifically designed for this: The Lee Filters systems (Sev5n, 100mm) have optional front threaded rings designed to hold a polarizer in front of the ND filter(s). The NiSi 70mm and 100mm square filter holders feature a specially-made thin polarizer filter meant to stack behind the ND filters, closest to ...


15

Aside from moving water, what other motion blur applications can one achieve with an ND filter? Pretty much anything that moves in relation to the camera. One can make people moving through a scene totally disappear by using enough density to require an exposure time of several minutes or longer. Imagine pacing a train while your assistant drives on a ...


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