49

This is called a color cast. As others have said, it is a result of an incorrect white-balance. Your camera is assuming that light is of a different color than it is and is compensating for that, resulting in a color cast. It can happen with any camera. Some Automatic White-Balance systems are better than others. A long time ago, some cameras had dedicated ...


38

but why i can see little bit of orange color with shutter speed 1/400 ? My best guess is that you had the camera set to automatic white balance (AWB). In the 1/200s shot, the moon was bright enough to easily be the brightest thing in the frame, and the white balance algorithm decided that that object was most likely to be white. In the 1/400s shot the ...


35

It is related to a heated substance, albeit in a somewhat theoretical way. The substance is an ideal incandescent black body, which would radiate a given color within a given color space at a given temperature. The location within the color space vs. temperature is called the Planckian locus, and I don't claim to understand everything in that article, but ...


27

No. If you shoot in RAW, there is nothing lost. In fact, in RAW, the white balance you set in-camera is nothing but advisory information to the post-processing software. A different multiplier is applied differently to the red, green, and blue channels during RAW conversion depending on the setting, and if you're doing that conversion from a RAW file, you ...


27

The white balance should be indicated on the box and the datasheet for the film. There aren't too many choices though. Most films are daylight balanced for shooting in direct sunlight (approx. 5000K). If you were shooting in open shade (approx. 6000K), you were expected to use a slight warming filter to get rid of the blue cast. If you shot daylight-...


26

This is actually fairly easy to test, and so I did. I used my Pentax K-7, so this doesn't speak to all cameras, but I think at least many work the same way. I worked in a dark room, lit only by an iPad app which simply turns the whole screen a certain color. I put the camera close enough to the screen that the color filled the entire frame, and, although I ...


26

Wikipedia's introductory statement on color temperature relates them quite well: The color temperature of a light source is the temperature of an ideal black-body radiator that radiates light of comparable hue to that of the light source. Black body radiators are an idealized concept, that radiate an energy spectrum with a peak intensity at a frequency ...


25

What is going on? I compared both pictures of the field (left out the one with the tractor, as it suffers from the same problem as the other over-exposed picture, IMHO) in After effects. The image above is a composition of all that I did: First, the composition of both your original images that I made in AE (white canvas added only here), then both ...


24

White balance is all relative. Light (natural or artificial) varies in colour and your eyes are used to adjusting it. It's amazing how an image can seem fine until you see another image with a different white balance and it suddenly looks wrong. Even the background colour of the page holding the image or frame can influence how colour balance is perceived. ...


21

The quickest GIMP tool I'm aware of is the Colors → Levels… tool. Near the bottom of the tool are four buttons: Auto, Pick black point, Pick gray point, and Pick white point. You can use the auto (iffy, but it may get it right or close for minor adjustment) or use the white point button to select the white point in the image. It is, by the way, the same ...


21

But there is nothing objective about perception. If the goal is to attempt to reproduce the perception, the closest will be to set the white balance from a grey card which is not directly lit with the Sun.


19

Sounds a bit iffy to me... A card, by itself, DOESN'T have a fixed L*a*b* colour - that's a product of the reflectivity of the card at different wavelengths and the intensity and wavelength distribution of the illumination. In the dark, L* will be 0. Light it with a coloured light and your a*b* will change. Light it with a "white" light with a different ...


18

Digital color works by separating light into three channels: red, green, and blue. This roughly mimics the way the human vision system creates the perception of color. Our vision system compensates inherently for different-colored light sources using environmental cues, but when you look at a digital or printed photograph, those cues aren't there, so we see ...


17

As you say, white balance is a subjective game. The only way to do this in anyway objectively would be to process your photos in conditions where all the factors affecting subjectivity, i.e. the colour temperature of the ambient light, is the same as when the photo was shot. In my Canon 5D Mk III, for example, this could be done as follows: Shoot the ...


17

The colour temperature is related to the black-body radiation produced by hot objects. The black-body radiation curve, shown below, shows the approximate intensity* curves at each wavelength for the radiation emitted by bodies at 5000K, 4000K and 3000K. * It actually shows the spectral radiance curve, which is a kind of flux. But you can think of it as an ...


17

This is the situation when you use fill-flash. Contrary to common belief, flash is NOT to be used in darkness. In darkness flash lights up the foreground and leaves background pitch black. Flash is best used to outshine bright light you can't control (like sun) so you can bring dark foreground up to bright background. This will most likely create white ...


17

Tint is the green-magenta axis, temperature is the blue-amber axis.


16

When you have already set your exposure parameters, white could be clipped in some single color channel (but not all, so your camera won't show it as blown), therefore not being very good basis for color balance adjustment. Also, paper will turn yellow during time. And just looking at the sheets currently on my desk, there's three different tones of white ...


16

Ideally, you're shooting in an environment with controlled lighting (a single light source, or several tuned to same color temperature), your subject and black or white surfaces only. In this case, the angle does not matter - just take care that its exposure falls somewhere in the middle in your test shot (so you're not accidentally clipping a channel). In ...


16

The camera can not alter the spectral sensitivities of the sensor, those are baked into the chip. What actually happens depends on what format your saving files in. If it's a Raw file format, what happens is the cameras white balance setting is recorded in the raw file for a raw file processor to use to create that white balance. If you're writing ...


16

My monitor is calibrated (less than a month ago). I see the white/gold dress, but the highlights on the white piping have a blue tinge to me. However I have seen pics of the (supposedly) original dress, and it is a deep blue and black. To me, the only way I can reconcile this pic, and the pic of the actual dress is that if this pic was taken with a really ...


16

There's no one way. Personally I find digital frees me to defer choices until after the shot. Not only that but I can "discover" new interpretations of a scene with different crops, different toning, color and contrast. So I'd suggest what you need to do is shift your perspective. Many people resist post processing as if it was an annoying nuisance. I'd ...


15

Don't use auto white balance - choose a color temperature that looks well and stick to it (or use a gray card if the color accuracy is important) Close all the windows - the daylight color changes based on weather, if possible use only flashes and photographic color balanced lights, if you must use normal indoor lights try not to change light bulbs, if you ...


14

The color correction is acting as expected. The point of using a color target is to adjust for the color of light to assume that the light is white. If you want to have the color that is present when shooting, you should instead use a fixed white point that you consider to be standard white, but naturally people's eyes will adjust quite a bit for the color ...


14

Your camera, for whatever reason, is setting the color temperature and white balance at different points for the two images. That gives it what we often call a color cast, tint, or hue which simply means the white balance used to interpret the raw data from the sensor was not correct for the light that illuminated the scene and gives it a predominance of ...


12

In a situation like this there is no substitute for a faster lens. Kids are a challenge to photograph at the best of times but with low light you only have two options flash which kids tend to hate or a faster larger aperture lens. Something like an f/1.8 or f/1.4 prime lens aren't too expensive and let in a lot more light than your kit lens which is f/3.5 ...


12

They are independent, the temperature slider affects the color temperature, which is effectively blue-yellow, while the tint affects the green-magenta axis. In Adobe Camera Raw, the temperature slider is before the tint slider, probably for a reason, so I think the best strategy is to adjust them top to bottom, and this is the advice given in many books on ...


12

Our eyes and brain do things on a daily basis that make LSD's effects seem relatively tame. One of the things our brains do is a color balancing activity of their own. No one knows why for certain, but its theorized we do it so that it would be easier to track prey as they dodge in and out of shadows (prey reflect the blue sky while in the shadow, so they ...


12

The color rendering of a film has to do with both color balance and the specific color response curves of the emulsion. This said, almost all the film stock produced today is daylight balanced, making it pretty difficult to find tungsten balanced film (which gives you strong blue cast if shot under sunlight). The subtle differences that you observed have ...


12

This frequently comes up in photographic reproduction jobs where one is trying to closely approximate some other object such as a painting antique drawing. This cannot be done with typical photographs even when adjusting them to a specific, matching, LAB color. Regular photographs increase color saturation and tailor contrast, boosting the midranges and ...


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