33

1. Fill the shadows You can use a big white reflector to bounce light, which would be the best and cheapest option, or if you have a big budget get a ton of sun white balanced light. With still photography is easier, you can use the bounced light the same as for video or use a flash. If you want DOF you also need to reduce the overall light using ND ...


26

The "Sunny Sixteen" rule applies to things that are lit by the sun. In the picture you took using the rule, things which are lit directly by the sun are well-exposed i.e. the cut-off tops of the branches, as well as their sunlit side, and the sunlit areas of the nest. The leaves are a bit of a problem, since they are relatively waxy; the parts of the leaves ...


21

No-budget options: Wait for some clouds to show up. Clouds are big and white, so just having some in the sky can provide light from different directions to fill in shadows somewhat. Shoot near a white wall. A sunlit wall is a huge reflector that'll give you soft light. Orient your subject relative to the sun and the wall to get the kind of light that you ...


17

This is lens flare, where reflections within the lens end up showing on your photos. General guidance to minimise it includes: Avoid getting the sun in shot (and ideally, avoid having it just-out-of-frame too) Use a lens hood to shade the front element Try to use lenses that have anti-reflective coatings Keep the front element clean, but follow the lens ...


10

In this case, you shouldn't be using a grey card at all. Grey cards (and related devices and and cards) are used as a reference point to make an image's color neutral, as your second two images show, but you don't want neutral, you want warm. What you need to do is change to color temperature and/or saturation in post processing; changes to color ...


10

I have to be honest, I think the first is better. It's darker, sure, but that's probably more the JPEG conversion settings in the camera than anything. From my perspective, I think you could do a lot more with the first image using RAW data and maybe a marginal lift in exposure. Point is, you didn't clip the highlights with that and it gives you room to work ...


10

Yes, it's coming in through the top of the partially opened door to the left.


10

Yes, you can use ISO 1600 in bright sunlight. But you will run into issues: You are getting the drawback of high ISO film (grain) without the benefit (high sensitivity). Depending on your camera you might run into shutter speed problems. Many film cameras are limited to 1/1000 sec or even 1/500 sec exposure time; this will not be enough. When you are unable ...


8

The white streak on the right edge appears to be the contrails from a jet airplane flying in the lower edges of the stratosphere. The hexagonal dots in the middle of the picture are called lens flare. They're caused by a bright light source not far outside the frame. In this case, judging from the shadow cast by the rock on the beach, the sun is just to the ...


7

The photographer can claim there are no reflectors all he wants, but there are several things visible in the photo that are functioning as reflectors! The pages of the book the child is holding are acting as reflectors to provide fill light on the face and the bottom of the child's left arm. Parts of the light colored chair are acting as a reflector, ...


7

Set your alarm clock earlier. Early-morning sun has a naturally "pale" look, before the sun gets more intense. If you check the shadow on the man bending over, it's relatively long. Natural sunlight at about 6-8am would give you exactly this kind of picture. The sea and the white sand on the beach also act as natural reflectors. Beach photos often have ...


6

Here are some options, I've personally had both huge successes and miserable failures with all of those techniques so you have to choose the one that fits the situation best: Find shade - A tree or a building that is just out of frame can do a very good job at preventing harsh sunlight (but you have to be careful not to blow up the background). Use some ...


6

A reflector is not necessarily an item specifically made for the purpose, but can be any surface that reflects light. Place your subjects right next to a light-colored or white surface that is lit by the sunlight. This will act as your reflector. Direct your subjects to look away from the sun, so that the light on their faces is the reflected light from ...


6

There are a few different ways to emphasize crepuscular rays in post production. 1) One of the ways those crepuscular rays can be enhanced is with any tool that can provide volumetric lighting effects. The one I use is a tool called Rays from Digital Film Tools. As you mentioned, this type of tool may be the type to add fake rays to a photo. However, I ...


6

It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to tell at times. Here's a list a strategies I might use to tell the difference: Look for contextual clues. Even a tiny recognizable feature could reveal the cardinal direction. Atmospheric clarity. During a sunrise, the dust has had time to settle at night, making the sky clearer than at sunset, where there is a ...


6

Sunlight is good but, as you note, it is also variable. By using a good high CRI ("Color rendering index")source, as James Snell notes, and by doing tests with white balance, you will be able to get results with artificial light that have far better consistency than you can achieve with sunlight, and which are close enough to the best that sunlight can give ...


6

There is a reason it's choosing f/8 aperture: With most lenses the sharpest image is produced at apertures in that range. The only reason to select wider apertures when you don't need the light is to produce a shallower depth of field, in which case you have three options to compensate for the exposure: Increase shutter speed Decrease ISO If you run out of ...


6

My Sony Alpha 6000 experienced extensive burn in from photographing the sun. The burn in happened either during experimentation prior to the eclipse, or during the August 21 eclipse. The burn in areas are the same hexagonal shape as the closed down aperture of the lens. It was a manual aperture Leicaflex lens with an E mount adapter. I don't think the burn ...


5

You are correct, light is additive, so if the flash provides the same amount of illumination to the subject as the sun, and if no flash spills onto the background, then the background will be one stop darker than the subject. To underexpose the background by 2 stops would require a flash with three times the power, guide number 70. It's worth noting that ...


5

The lens hood should be kept on and point away from the lens at all times. It keeps unwanted light from entering the lens which often causes flare and it protects the front element from accidental knocks. There is no downside to having the lens hood on the right way, except for added bulk. Most people unfortunately use their lens hood in decoration ...


5

As has been said this is the result of lens flare. Lens flare is caused by a point source light in the field of view of the camera. In this picture that source is the sun. But you can see this effect with other point sources such as a lamp, flashlight, or headlight. Another factor in the intensity of lens flare is the aperture. A small aperture (large f ...


5

Iceland is so far north that depending where you are in the country, you get significantly different results. Compare the following chart from gaisma.com for Reykjavík, which is in the south: With this chart, for Ísafjörður in the north: As you can see, between mid June and the beginning of July, the sun never actually sets in the north of Iceland, however ...


5

Since I doubt you want or can increase the shutter speed, you should get a ND filter. You've already mentioned that you've tried to increase the shutter speed, and you most likely already know about ISO, a neutral density filter would be the way to go for you. A ND filter is basically a gray "lens" that darkens your image. ND filters have various densities, ...


5

I've tried to capture the rays of light in the forest many times, and have largely only had middling success. Eventually, however, I realized that the problem is one of contrast. The contrast between the dark forest and the bright light is what makes these scenes interesting. The solution is to increase the contrast between the rays of light and the ...


5

This is not a digitally-created effect; this is a physical atmospheric phenomenon called a sun halo or 22.5° halo. It occurs when there's a thin layer of high-altitude cirrus clouds with hexagonal ice crystals that refract the passing sunlight, creating a rainbow-like effect. The image you posted is a particularly good example of the phenomenon; it has a ...


5

When the sun is directly overhead and behind you there are no shadows. Such light turns a 3D landscape into 2D cardboard cutouts - it is the shadows what gives a landscape a feeling of depth. Where the sun should be depends on the kind of photography you do. Photographers shooting color like the twilight hours (late evening and early morning). Shadows are ...


5

You can't see sunbeams in a vacuum. Pretty much anywhere else is fair game. What we call sunbeams are areas where light from the sun is reflecting off small particles such as dust or water vapor suspended in the air in contrast to other areas that are not directly receiving sunlight. These particles scatter the light from the sun and some of it is scattered ...


5

There's nothing inherently incorrect about using 1600-ish speed film outdoors. The issue you may run into is that your camera might not have the aperture/shutter speed combination to properly expose the film. For example, a compact point and shoot with a maximum aperture of f/16 and shutter speed of 1/500 won't be able to expose 1600 film properly in bright ...


5

It depends if you take the upper or lower Antelope Canyon. I did the lower one which apparently is a bit more tolerant for light entrance. Besides on time of day it also depends on the time of year, as you correctly have analyzed. In Spring and Autumn the best time will be when the sun is near its Zenith. In summer this will be between 11am and 1pm. In ...


4

I've shot heaps with this effect with a respectable degree of success and the key points I've found are The air needs something in it to reflect (water,mist,smoke,dust etc). The air needs to be backlit (ie light is coming towards the viewer not from behind the viewer) and The air has darkness behind it Slow shutter speeds mildly allow the moving particles ...


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