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11

EXIF v2.31 (p49) defined time-zone offset fields in 2016 and the XMP time-zone guidelines (p33-34) also consider time-zones. The implementation in cameras and programs is rather minimalist at the moment. See also my answer to an older question: What do you do with your camera clock time in relation to time zones?


10

There's already a similar question on the ExifTool forums. It can be done using two sequential ExifTool commands. First, make sure all the date to the same exiftool -datetimeoriginal='2015:02:22 00:00:00' DIR And then increment the time on each exiftool '-datetimeoriginal+<0:0:${filesequence}0' DIR This command creates backup files. Add -...


10

What Windows displays under the "Date Taken" property isn't an embedded tag. It fills that property from a number of tags depending upon the file type. For example, for a JPG, Windows will use any of these tags: EXIF:DateTimeOriginal, XMP:DateTimeOriginal, EXIF:CreateDate, and the system FileCreateDate. ExifTool can create an EXIF:DateTimeOriginal tag in a ...


8

ExifTool is my go-to tool for time-shifting photos. Assuming Windows, to add 1 hour to all date/time fields stored in the photo metadata: exiftool.exe -AllDates+=1 C:\path\to\folder\of\photos or to subtract one hour: exiftool.exe -AllDates-=1 C:\path\to\folder\of\photos By default, this will make a copy of the original as backup before modification. To ...


8

Yes, it is the time at which the location was determined. That may be a second before the picture was taken, but it could be much more, if for example you are in a canyon and the GPS is unable to make a fix.


7

Very recent versions of PNG support EXIF, but a lot of software still does not understand or work with it. The lack of a standardized metadata block has been one of its big disadvantages for photography. If you need a lossless format which preserves (very-similar-to-EXIF, since it's the basis for EXIF) metadata, try TIFF. The downside, though, is that TIFF ...


7

CIPA DC- 008 is the standard for Exif 2.2. Of note it makes no mention of "timezone." "GMT" is also not mentioned either. The term "UTC" does appear but only specifies the GPS time is recorded as such. Pedants may note that this is slightly misleading since GPS time is not identical to UTC My point, in short, is that omission of timezone is likely not ...


7

I've actually done this myself. The first time I was not successful. The second time I was successful. Considerations There are a few things that go into this. Planning -- finding a transit near you Equipment -- what you'll need and/or considerations for what would work Exposure -- considerations of the ISS that will influence your exposure Planning You'...


6

Unfortunately not. Most cameras only have a 'dumb' timezone-ignorant clock. You do of course also have no guarantee that the clock is set right, so the timestamp in the EXIF data may be wrong anyway, even if you know or assume the correct time zone. What you might do to improve your interpretation of the EXIF timestamp is, if the image is geo-tagged, to ...


5

I don't think any significant software which uses this. The EXIF standard is to assume that the time zone matches the correct one for the location where the photo was taken. Most cameras have ad hoc non-standard tags for dealing with this; for example, my Pentax camera sets World Time Location. However, EXIF isn't all there is, and in fact I think most ...


5

With regards to EXIF v2.31 (p49) time-zone integration (2016) and XMP time-zone guidelines (p34) it might make sense to look at this problem once more. Local time is important especially in the human-based interaction with pictures. Looking at a sunset photo one expects the clock to show something in the second half of the day, for breakfast photos rather ...


5

Since the best answers use non-Windows syntax, I will here post their code converted for Microsoft Windows. @StarGeek solution, very fast and simple: First set a base timestamp to all images: exiftool -datetimeoriginal="2015:01:01 12:00:00" DIR (DIR is the name of the folder containing all images.) Then assign incremental timestamps: exiftool "-...


4

Yes, it is possible. The ideal case would be if it was visible from your home so that you can leave a tripod stationary and just attach the camera when you need to. If the construction site is somewhere else, however, you can't use the tripod to mark a location. Better try to think of a good location to shoot from with something that won't move for a while - ...


4

Please check out http://jambula.sourceforge.net/ to batch insert shooting date/time/comment on a jpeg image in different formats and languages. A special feature is that the date stamp is lossless. It is supported on Linux and Mac also.


4

Try Irfanview. It is freeware (AFAIR) and has a very flexible batch renaming system. Other than that I would try writing a script, something along the lines of for X in $(seq -w 0 20) ; do plus=$(expr $X \* 10) exiftool -alldates+="0:0:0 0:0:$plus" image_$X.jpg done The first line creates a loop through the numbers in the file names that you have, eg. ...


4

The Nikon D5100 uses a rechargeable internal clock battery. It should have enough charge to give you 3 months to charge the main battery. A main battery that is almost completely empty, should also have enough power left to keep the clock running for months or even years. There is probably a problem with your internal battery, or a contact to it. The ...


3

Well, I didn't post my bash answer because the question specifically asked about a Windows solution, but since two other people did, here's what I came up with: for file in *.jpg do exiftool -DateTimeOriginal="1111:11:11 00:00:00" $file exiftool -DateTimeOriginal+="00:00:${file:6:4}0" $file done Avoids messing with the date command. :) Note that in ...


3

No, the GoPro Hero 3+ does not have a self-timer mode. But there are several ways of taking 'selfie' photos: You could set the Hero to timelapse mode, ie taking a photo every 0.5, 1 or 2 seconds. Press the shutter, and it will start taking a series of photos. So you can then get in position for the selfie, and it will get a number of photos of you. You can ...


3

Some upper tier Canon cameras allow you to set the length of time the viewfinder display remains active when no buttons are pressed. A quick look at the EOS 70D Instruction Manual indicates this is not an option with the 70D. You can adjust the time exposure information is actively displayed while in Live View. There are a few ways to keep the viewfinder ...


3

There is one internal battery, which take care about the clock. Check please this web page, step 13, right image. If this battery is discharged (it is not rechargeable) lost of settings as clock is expected behavior. IMHO there is no way to change it by self, so my humble recommendation is to contact GoPro service


3

Most cameras have a capacitor or internal battery that keeps the clock and settings active while the battery is being changed. If the camera is left with a dead battery for a very long time, the capacitor or battery may become fully discharged and dysfunctional.


3

It is closely related to the determination of B&W film speed, which is specified in the standards ISO 6 and ISO 2240 and based on sensiometric density and contrast measurements of the negative. The actual speed of a black and white film can only be measured after it has been developed and the reference development times are defined, so that the negative ...


2

While I can't think of a way to do it with the built-in functions of Lightroom, it can be done with the help of the LR/Transporter Lightroom Plug-in (donationware; free version restricted to modifying 5 images at a time). If you don't choose to donate, you'll need to repeat the steps 2…4 below for every 5 images until you're through your whole collection. We'...


2

Yes, you can swipe in from the right to select shoot modes. Timelapse is an option and you can even select how often it shoots a frame. https://www.camerajabber.com/shoot-time-lapse-video-gopro-hero5-black/


2

Short answer: Yes. Longer answer: Make sure you shoot with the same focal length (and - even better - using same lens). You'll have to note a couple of points in order to shoot the same frame (f.e. upper left point in viewer, central focusing point, and lower left point). However your photos still will not be perfectly aligned and you'll have to use some ...


2

I'd suggest saving the timestamp directly into the file metadata. You can do this and rename an entire directory with a single exiftool command. Try this: exiftool -globalTimeShift -5:30 -d '%Y-%m-%d-%H%M%S.%%e' '-ModifyDate<FileModifyDate#' '-CreateDate<FileModifyDate#' '-DateTimeOriginal<FileModifyDate#' '-Filename<FileModifyDate' /path/to/...


2

This question has sort of already been asked. You can determine if the time in the Exif is the time when the shutter opens or when it closes (when it opens makes things a bit simpler because you won't need to factor in exposure time later). before you start shooting at satellites, you can take a picture of an accurate clock, reading the time on the picture ...


2

If you do not insist very much for opensource and you will agree with free software you can use XnView MP. Open in Browser mode Select images Ctrl+U (batch convert) For action select Image->Text Enter in the field {Filename} or select it clicking on right arrow Set output parameters (if required) and press Convert


1

(The following solution is for a Linux Machine. However for other OS, one can something similar in spirit: SAVE your metadata before moving the images anywhere from the MicroSD) Using this command before moving the images from MicroSD card: exiftool /path/to/file/filename.JPG | grep Modification gives the output: File Modification Date/Time : 2017:05:...


1

Got the same idea but I'm lucky enough to take day off. I made some tests last Sunday and I will make a few adjustments Friday, but after gathering some more info on the net I will probably go for • Manual focus and manual settings • F between 7.1 and 9 • Speed 1/8000 or 1/6400 • Aperture 16mm (full format) • ISO 200 I'm interested in the landscape but ...


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