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29

That's a nice silhouette! You're running into the same problem that anyone runs into when photographing a very backlit subject: a lot of light is coming from the background and creating a drastic difference in ideal exposure between the background and foreground. Given this, you can handle the situation a number of different ways: Change the Exposure to ...


22

But there is nothing objective about perception. If the goal is to attempt to reproduce the perception, the closest will be to set the white balance from a grey card which is not directly lit with the Sun.


18

that purple haze is probably a color cast caused by the glass itself; the welders glass often isn't neutral color. you should be looking at solar filters, or very dark (and probably stacked) ND filters. Thousand Oaks sells solar filters, to name one company.


17

As you say, white balance is a subjective game. The only way to do this in anyway objectively would be to process your photos in conditions where all the factors affecting subjectivity, i.e. the colour temperature of the ambient light, is the same as when the photo was shot. In my Canon 5D Mk III, for example, this could be done as follows: Shoot the ...


16

I think if you look through pictures you'll find quite a bit of difference, but I suspect much of it is illusory. Specifically, you'll almost certainly find more pictures of really spectacular sunsets than sunrises. I'm not at all convinced that this is because an average sunset is more spectacular though -- it's a simple matter of the number of pictures ...


12

Changing the exposure compensation or using manual exposure can brighten your subject, but it will also make the sky brighter. Too bright to see the effect of the sunset. You can't change the laws of physics or the physical properties of light. Sunset means darkness and you must provide more light for your foreground subject. This is even more critical ...


11

The Photographer's Ephemeris is a great software package to get started with these sorts of calculations. There is a free desktop version that you can use at home before your trip, and if it turns out to be really helpful, there are paid versions available for iOS and Android. This tool lets you mark a spot on a map and then calculate sunrise, sunset, ...


9

This is just the diffused light going through the welder glass. It comes from two sources: the sky and the two welder glass. (These have coplanar surfaces that allows for bouncing the light for long.) You cannot do anything with those either. You need to use optical quality filters (ND filters of high value) to achieve this effect, although then you will ...


8

Since most visitors come to New York City and refer to it as New York, I will base my answers on the assumption you mean New York City (we can be pedantic around here :) ). Manhattan Island runs lengthwise essentially Northeast to Southwest, such that if one were standing in Midtown (say Times Square), sunrise would occur roughly east of Central Park ...


7

From my (family's) observations, generally sunsets have a larger spread of light. Also sunsets have more colour depth. For example: Sunrise (from Wikipedia) Sunset (from wikipedia) This is from our own observations, NOT from any documented sources.


7

When it comes to the sun, objectivity is harder than that. Color of the setting sun is changing while it's descending - and white balance basically means that you choose the light of the sun as white point. It differs minute-to-minute in last stages of sunset, but overall - you should decrease color temperature if you want to set white balance correctly ...


6

It is indeed difficult, if not impossible, to tell at times. Here's a list a strategies I might use to tell the difference: Look for contextual clues. Even a tiny recognizable feature could reveal the cardinal direction. Atmospheric clarity. During a sunrise, the dust has had time to settle at night, making the sky clearer than at sunset, where there is a ...


6

The effect is known as Rayleigh scattering. Blue light has a wavelength of around 400 nano meters, which is more likely than red light (650nm) to be absorbed by particles in the sky and radiated toward the ground, leaving the red light to carry on and hit our retinas. The water vapour in fog, however, are much too large to scatter individual wavelengths and ...


6

Most P&S I have used does amazing jobs with the built-in presets (Scene modes)! Though most people think the presets are targeted towards amateurs, but trust me they are not! The companies have invested heavy amount of research and money to configure these presets often using real life feedback from very experienced photographers. So I'd not ...


6

You are up against the dynamic range - the difference between brightest highlights with visible detail and darkest shadows with visible detail. No camera currently available can cover as big a range as human eye. That is a fact you have to work around. There are a few good options. You can: pull the brightness of the sky with a ND grad filter (not really ...


5

At the equator, you would get 1 minute extra sun at either end of the day per 1.5km of altitude, according to this page. Using trigonometry, for every degree north or south you travel, the extra time the sun would stay above the horizon (per 1.5km altitude) would be (1/cos (latitude)) * 1 minute per 1.5km, giving the following values: 10° : 1.02 min = 1 ...


5

It's pretty much all post-processing. Search for internet articles using the terms tone mapping, exposure fusion, noise reduction, and HDR.


5

You ask how to do this without a flash, but this is absolutely a situation where you should use flash — at least, if you don't want the silhouette effect you have here. You could create a composite shot with multiple exposures, but that's somewhat difficult with non-static subjects and hard to get looking right anyway. In some situations, a reflector can be ...


5

In short, you can not get both the subject and the sky equally exposed without a flash. Camera sensors do not have that much dynamic range. If you get that sky at f/4 you have to use a flash in order to illuminate your subject f/4 at the given distance. In case you still do not want to use a flash you should get a reflector, reflecting sunlight to your ...


4

Dust in the atmosphere is the main cause of colorful sunrises and sunsets. According to wikipedia sunsets tend to be more colorful due to the presence of more dust in the atmosphere at the end of the day compared to dawn. Dust scatters (Rayleigh scattering) the small wavelengths of light (blues and greens), leaving the reds and oranges to come through. But ...


4

I'm a little unclear what you're asking, but if you literally want to measure the color temperature of the light from the setting sun, you can take a photograph of the setting sun in raw mode, making sure not to overexpose the disk of the sun. Then, in your processing software, you can set the white balance by clicking the eyedropper on the disk of the sun. ...


4

On Android there's a great app called Sun Surveyor. This will tell you sunrise/set/golden/blue times, as others do. But it's got the map view (as shown elsewhere), and another unique feature, which is an "augmented reality" view where you hold your phone up, and it uses the camera to overlay on the real scenery the path that the sun is going to take during ...


4

I just got a new camera, a Canon EOS Rebel xti Congratulations! New gear is always exciting. ;-) Also, welcome to Photo.SE. I am still learning what it can do. First thing to do: Read the manual. I know that sounds obvious and maybe condescending, but I get the strong impression that lots of people never read the manual when they get a new camera. I'll ...


4

In this case, the difference is not really huge, and if you have the shot in raw, it should be possible to bring up the shadows in postprocessing while not making it look unnatural. To some extent, it's even possible to do this with the JPEG file you provided here: for this example I used darktable (2 instances of "shadows&highlights" with different ...


3

From my experience with point-n-shoot cameras shooting sunsets/sunrises I would say the problem is in overexposure. When you try to catch more of what's in front of you the automatic exposure measuring happens on this dark foreground and leads to too bright sky and that really eats out the colors. There is two easy ways to counteract for this. Composition: ...


3

First off, let's talk about your eyes. Just because you feel no discomfort is no guarantee you are safe to look at the sun with your naked eye. From a NASA news release about safe solar viewing during an eclipse: Damage to the eyes comes predominantly from invisible infrared wavelengths. The fact that the Sun appears dark in a filter or that you feel no ...


3

You can also use a free tool that I've developed with a colleague. It computes the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The example in the image is for Chamonix in France. Go to suncurves.com to find your own location. Hope you like it! I'm using it for all my outdoor shoots.


3

I've found Sol to be not only an excellent sunset/sunrise app, but it looks great too and I like the visual representation of the length of the day. Sol also has relative alarms that will alert you X minutes prior to a sun event (sunset, Golden Hour, etc). It can also be set to adjust for your location if you travel. Also check out SunCalc - it's not ...


3

Interesting to consider what "color temp" or "WB" causes the monitor to show the actual same color. The same spectra would indeed be the same in a real sense. But we don't have that. The same tristimulus RGB values should "look" the same, at least to a primitive stage in processing in the eye. But the brain interprets that based on the brain's own WB ...


3

For an image like this, if you don't want to process multiple exposures in Photoshop you could use a graduated ND filter. Since the skyline is fairly straight a hard graduated 2 or 3 stop filter might suffice. With the dynamic range of modern cameras you could could also probably use a graduated filter in postprocessing without having noticeable issues.


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