42

Here's an image that may help people to visualise why many lens hoods are petal-shaped.


23

What you are seeing in the photo is a specific type of lens flare known as ghosting. It is an inverted and reversed reflection of the brightest highlights of the scene. If you were to draw an x and y axis intersecting in the center of the photo, then the bright light on top of the building just left of the vertical axis is reflected the same distance below ...


17

This is lens flare, where reflections within the lens end up showing on your photos. General guidance to minimise it includes: Avoid getting the sun in shot (and ideally, avoid having it just-out-of-frame too) Use a lens hood to shade the front element Try to use lenses that have anti-reflective coatings Keep the front element clean, but follow the lens ...


14

Those are almost certainly reflections from the UV filter. I recommend taking it off. This is a topic of much debate, but the fact is filters do cause artifacts visible in your photos — you've got the evidence right there. You can get better results from a more expensive filter, but then it'll cost almost as much as your lens. Lenses aren't as fragile as ...


12

It's plain old lens flare, looks like the sun is in shot just behind that cloud. Different lens constructions flare differently. It actually looks a lot like the flare you get from old anamorphic lenses used in cinematography to project wide format images onto regular 35mm film. The flare is so iconic that filters exist to replicate it: (source: frankladner....


12

tl; dr. Blend a "panorama" from only slightly rotated exposures and make sure no flare is included in the final result. It's not possible to optically remove this type of flare when shooting into the sun (though different lenses have different levels of flare resistance). However, there are other effective ways to get rid of it. What you can do is take ...


12

No. Adding filters will only make this worse. The reflection in your picture is not actually in the scene, so there is nothing a filter can get rid of. The ghost image is caused by reflection between lens elements. Therefore, adding another possible surface light can bounce off of will make things worse. You might wonder why light is bouncing between ...


11

I agree with what Hermann said, but have a different answer as to how to avoid this. Expose properly. Notice that the blue smudge is much dimmer than the moon, which is so bright that it is totally blown out and even has a quite visible halo around it. Some of that may be caused by atmospheric effects, but I also suspect blooming due to extreme over ...


11

I have done three things in the past to deal with this. Compose the photo in such a way that the lens flare is attractive... that's a great choice for your example above because the sun is IN the photo. Some lenses have an attractive flare (many don't) Use lens hoods, paper, or your hand to block the light that is causing the flare. This works when the ...


10

In my opinion that "flare" is caused by a dirty lens. I'm guessing you attempted to clean it, by using a wipe, but failed to properly clean it, which is why the flare has directionality. Try using a micro fibre cloth. I recently bought some that are designed for use in the kitchen, and it set me back by only a single dollar. I use these for cleaning my ...


10

Veiling glare is light that's not intended to be part of the image, per se, but ends up on the recording medium (film or sensor) anyway. It's caused by reflections and scattering of light by optical elements and the lens barrel. This produces an overlay of general brightness, which raises what should be the darkest parts, reducing overall image contrast. ...


9

Yes grease and smudges can cause flare, but instead of well defined circles or lines you are more likely to get an overall clouding effect with a visible glow around highlights and lightsources. In fact it used to be a common technique with glamour and some portrait photographers to smear vaseline on a lens in order to get flattering (if cheesy) soft focus ...


9

A Flair for flare. Flare reduces the contrast of the image captured. It can affect the image overall or selectively. I'm going to make a great leap of faith and guess that you are after selective flare such as a round or symmetrical shape that plays across the image. Your concept of what is beautiful and desirable versus undesirable is personal and will ...


9

It is "lens flare" in the first, but in the second, it is the reflection of the black internal parts of the front of your lens which are illuminated by the direct sun reflecting off the inside of your UV filter.


8

You can get all sorts of interesting shapes and colours when shooting directly into a lightsource like that. All pieces of glass reflect a certain amount of light and transmit a certain amount, so you actually get flare from everything in your scene every time you shoot, only it's usually much dimmer than the rest of the picture so you don't see it. When ...


8

It's a reflection of the image of the sun in the sensor, with the PDAF focus pixel covers reflecting brightly. See: https://www.metabunk.org/orbs-with-dots-focus-pixels-reflection-in-sun-reflection-lens-flare.t8872/


8

Diffraction spikes are caused by diffraction at the edge of the aperture. The number of spikes relates to the number of blades and the intensity of the effect relates to the exact shape of the blades and how closed down the aperture is. On the other hand, lens flare is reflections within the lens itself. Visible as a clear rendition of the internals of the ...


7

The UV filter likely explains this. As I've explained in this answer, any filter will degrade image quality, but some do so more than others. Tiffen filters do not have anti-reflective coatings and are thus prone to flare. You should either remove the filter or use a high-quality one from a brand like B+W or Hoya.


7

This does look like some kind of flare, I can't tell if this is caused by the lens or the UV filter but filters (especially "not so expensive" ones) are know to cause flare. To avoid flare you just have to prevent the light coming directly from the sun from hitting the front of your lens, this is what the lens hood does when the sun is outside the frame. ...


7

The main two things that I have found to be helpful when trying to achieve the sunburst effect are: Stop the lens down to at least f/16. I usually start at f/22 and work my way wider if I'm not satisfied with the effect. Note that each aperture will give a slightly different sunburst effect. Expose for the sky. Without a flash or reflector, your foreground ...


7

The elliptical flares were probably from an anamorphic lens. These lenses squash the image horizontally in order to get a widescreen picture on a standard width film strip. The anamorphic elements are usually on the front of the lens so the lens barrel appears elliptical to the camera. Lens flares are just reflections so can take the shape of any lens ...


7

This shot has been taken with star 4 filter. You could simulate it with photoshop, but I prefer to put a filter and have that effect while shooting. There are multiple different start filters: star 4, star 6, star 8 - number tells how many streaks from each strong light point you will get. As for the second part, it does not matter outdoors or indoors, as ...


7

The "rainbow effect" is lens flare. Point and shoot cameras as especially susceptible to lens flare as they often are made out of low quality materials. They also typically do not have any type of coatings on the lens to help with lens flare. Additional information: What causes lens flare? How can you avoid/minimize lens flare when shooting into the sun?


7

There is a distinction between HAZE and flare - for the purposes of this I will cover FLARE only. Lens flare is caused by light from a particularly bright source such as the sun or a bulb directly striking the lens element surfaceS at an off-centre axis, and not being REFRACTED but instead being REFLECTED either off the back surface of the lens element, OR ...


7

You have a light smudge or a very minor abrasion on the surface of your lens, running at 90 degrees to the direction of the highlight smearing you are seeing. It probably won't be visible on the lens unless you get the angle of the light just right. If it's a smudge, a good cleaning (with a good cleaner - use tissues or fabric designed for the purpose and a ...


7

This effect is caused by refractions and reflections of light directly approaching the camera. Since it's happening on-axis you can't tame it using your hand as a lens hood as you've noted and anything you use will need to be between you and the light source. While you might find that an appropriately set polariser helps I wouldn't bet my house on it. It ...


7

What causes lens flare along specific axes? This answer assumes the 1st and 3rd images are caused by the same phenomenon, and image 2 is caused by something different. Image #2 To my eyes, this flare appears to be caused by a smudged front element. This can easily happen when one attempts to wipe the element clean, but doesn't get all of the (presumably) ...


7

The reason the background is not dark is because there is light shining on it. The same light sources that you are attempting to record directly are also illuminating the areas around the light and those areas are reflecting some of that light to the camera. Additionally, The highlights of the lights themselves are so overexposed that they appear almost pure ...


7

Don't use the UV filter. Not only is it completely useless while using an actual solar filter, it is actively hurting your image by creating reflections. Even if it is the highest-quality UV filter with multi-coating, the strong and contrasty image of the sun will bounce off the lens (usually the front element), to the filter's flat surface, and back to the ...


6

Looks like flare caused by some kind of oily residue on the lens. I wouldn't say you have permanently damaged it, although that may be a remote possibility if you scratched it or maybe etched away any of the multicoating. I would find some photographic lens cleaning solution and a nice microfiber cloth, a soft camel hair brush or a LensPen, and try to ...


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