44

The textbook method is, as others mentioned, to suppress the texture in frequency space. I will explain how to find the correct filter, that you can basically do manually in ImageJ (freeware java app). When you open the program it is a strip of menu. The parts you need are: File Open Selection rectangle Image -> Crop Process-> FFT -> FFT Process-&...


42

If the lighting was asymmetrical and consistent between shots, then the lighting will be flipped as well and this might easily make the shot look simply awful or so awful its funny. This may not be appropriate for their brand.


35

In addition to the points Alex S made, you need to consider why they want RAW. There are several possible reasons: Bit depth as Alex S said. JPG suffers from compression artefacts which RAW doesn't. Blown up to exhibtion size these can jump out and ruin a print. Having the RAW file is often used as a proxy for having taken the photo, as RAWs aren't ...


30

There are no hard and fast rules in art. You are free to follow your heart. If flipping some of the images assists in the symmetry of the final presentation, then go for it! Few if any will recognize their image was flipped. After all, they see a flipped image when they shave or put on makeup. Yes, the dressing, shaving, and makeup image in the mirror is ...


29

I can't believe no one suggested this yet: Just use the rectangular marquee to select what you want to crop down to, and COPY it to your clipboard. Then delete the entire layer and PASTE what you copied to a new layer. This is especially useful if the layer you're cropping is larger than the canvas, in which case the select-inverse technique is messy.


28

RAW is not (or minimally) processed image data from camera sensor. JPEG is processed image data. Typically, raw-files from modern cameras have 12-14-bit per pixel which means up to 16384 values (for more details see Michael Clark's comment). JPEG can have only 256 luminance values per RGB channel. This means that jpeg contains much less data than a ...


25

Upon viewing his portfolio at the link you provided, my first thought was push processing. In push processing, one typically underexposes the shot (that is, meters and set exposure as if the the film were a higher ISO than it really is), then compensate in the darkroom by overdeveloping the film to account for the underexposed shot. Push processing tends to ...


24

Simply select and copy the screen/glare you want to overlay, and paste it to a new layer. Set the Blending Mode to Hard Light. Then paste in your product image in a new layer and place it underneath the glare layer (you will obviously need to do some jiggery pokery to fit this image onto the screen in the photo). Result:


24

You can use Photoshop's Vanishing Point filter for this. It's easiest to use a 3D-capable version of Photoshop,¹ which I presume you have, since you haven't mentioned any other 3D software. There is an alternate path for those using a version of Photoshop that lacks the 3D features, which I will cover inline below. This technique works best with a ...


23

If you want to achieve this digitally note how the whites aren't full white and the blacks aren't full black. You can do that e.g. in Lightroom or any other editing tool by pulling the endpoints for the highlights and shadows towards the middle. To get a creamy tint, select the RGB Blue-Channel and reduce the Highlights-max Point. This bumps up the yellow:...


18

Digital color works by separating light into three channels: red, green, and blue. This roughly mimics the way the human vision system creates the perception of color. Our vision system compensates inherently for different-colored light sources using environmental cues, but when you look at a digital or printed photograph, those cues aren't there, so we see ...


18

I don't use Photoshop, so here it is done with Gimp, but I assume the same tools are available on PS: Use Wavelet decompose to decompose the image into its frequency components (these are images that are progressively blurrier and which added to each other, rebuild your initial image). By flicking the visibility of each layer, identify which layers carry ...


17

What I did in the end Thank you all for your suggestions and advice. You all really helped me decide what to do. Just to clarify, I wasn't aware that they wanted this before the shoot and they were very happy with the photos, they just wanted some taken from the opposite angle (with the subject turned to the right rather than to the left). In the end I ...


16

The skin is exactly the same in both images. It's your perception of the skin that is different based on the surrounding colors. Our eyes and brain have a remarkable ability to adapt to different lighting conditions. But when the surrounding conditions change our brains expect the things within those conditions to change as well. In this case, the ...


15

Here's a solution using python and opencv: This will crop all the faces it finds in the jpeg photos in whatever folder you run it in, with the padding specified by the left, right, top, bottom variables: import cv2 import sys import glob cascPath = "haarcascade_frontalface_default.xml" # Create the haar cascade faceCascade = cv2.CascadeClassifier(...


15

This is motion blur caused by 'panning'. Ideally, you would use a tripod or monopod and track the car (panning) as it's moving with a relatively slow shutter speed. The background will blur as you move the camera, but the car will stay in focus as it's relative position with the camera hasn't changed. The slower your shutter speed the harder it will be to ...


14

This picture is a composition of slices of many photos taken from different heights, likely from a drone. The key to understanding it is to examine the camera's perspective or point of view from different horizontal slices of the composited image. For approximately the bottom quarter of the image, the camera is below the roof lines of the buildings at the ...


14

Graphic Design Stack Exchange: How to cut how hair accurately Advanced hair extraction tutorial First off, plugins and simpler methods are available. This is if you want to get higher quality results. I'll be using this photo from Photo by Ariana Prestes on Unsplash.com: Note: I'm going to be doing the body in a separate layer so I'll be ignoring it for ...


13

I was always wondering if theres anyway to get bokeh that looks something like this (vertically distorted bokeh). This vertically-oval bokeh is the result of an anamorphic lens, which "squeezes" an image horizontally to fit a laterally-wide field of view into a relatively narrower film or sensor format. The image must be "unsqueezed" in post-processing or ...


13

It's all to do with the profile applied to the raw files and guesses other software makes as to what that profile ought to be... RAW is not an 'absolute' format in terms of the image displayed, it's raw data to which an 'opinion' of what the image ought to look like can be manipulated from. It will already contain several view options added by the camera, ...


13

I agree with Tetsujin. The highlights in the image you posted are blown out to pure white. Since you do not have the raw file, there is no information to recover. It is possible to use collage and cloning techniques to fill in the missing detail, but it would be time consuming and likely not worthwhile, especially if you can retake the image. You can avoid ...


12

Look at the shadows under the cars. Now look at the shadow under the model... Oh wait! This looks to be more about how it was lit and exposed when shot than how it was post-processed. This photo is not really as much about the lens, the camera, or the post-processing. It is more about the off camera lighting illuminating the model and what that allows with ...


12

The color replacement tool isn't working for you because its default mode is "Color", which changes hue and saturation, but not luminosity (brightness/value). That's why you get the blue or the gray→gray effect. Changing this the tool's mode to Luminosity may get you what you want. I don't have Photoshop, so I'm not the best-suited to answer that. For an ...


12

This "banding" is caused by the primary light source in the image varying in intensity over time, and by the (electronic) rolling shutter in the camera converting this variation over time into variation in illumination across the image. This changing illumination affects the image multiplicatively — i.e. the brightness of a pixel in the image, on ...


11

Find or create the silhouette profile image. You can find tutorials online about this by searching for "silhouette," "profile," etc. I'm being vague about this because there are lots of ways to do it. This is not the appropriate forum for listing all of the possible ways. I went out and grabbed this image: Then turned it into a silhouette: Load both the ...


11

The display corruption could be a consequence of using GPU acceleration in the ACR module. Not all cards are supported, so try toggling off the option. Also make sure that option is off in Photoshop.


11

Colour-dodge will do it. You didn't say what software you have access to, though I assume most editing software will have a Dodge/Burn feature. In Photoshop I set it to dodge shadows with about 40% strength. This was a very quick attempt, you could do better, taking more care, on the original full-sized image...


11

When an image contains pure white (#fff or values RGB 255/255/255) - we refer to this as "blown" or "blown out". There is nothing you can do to alter these pixels to gain lost detail. For example, I've cranked the levels to darken everything, yet here those pixels are...in all their blown glory: Keeping that in mind, the only thing that you can do is ...


11

Straight away I should mention that lunar photography is different that astrophotography of deep-sky objects. The types of frames you are describing (calibration frames) are extremely helpful for deep-sky objects but not as useful for lunar photography. You probably wont need to worry too much about noise in lunar photography because you can take those ...


11

There are various software solutions that will attempt to recreate edges that are not really there. Photoshop's Smart Sharpen isn't bad, but it still tends to look a bit 'cartoon-like' if you push it hard. Example… pushed too hard click for larger I know it's tough when you find one that would have been great… if only… but you just have to learn to cull if ...


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