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29

The answer will be easy to figure out if you understand a little bit what polarization means. I don't have a polarizing filter to play with, but I do have a physics degree, so here it goes: Light reflected by certain types of surfaces (such as glass or water, but not metal) is partially linearly polarized. Light reflected under a certain angle is fully ...


12

tl; dr. Blend a "panorama" from only slightly rotated exposures and make sure no flare is included in the final result. It's not possible to optically remove this type of flare when shooting into the sun (though different lenses have different levels of flare resistance). However, there are other effective ways to get rid of it. What you can do is take ...


11

Any Other advice on increasing the reflection over water surfaces. Specular reflections like you get from water are stronger the lower the angle of incidence. This means when the light is coming almost parallel to the surface and striking a glancing blow. This is easy to achieve under controlled lighting. In natural light this means waiting until the sun ...


11

I have done three things in the past to deal with this. Compose the photo in such a way that the lens flare is attractive... that's a great choice for your example above because the sun is IN the photo. Some lenses have an attractive flare (many don't) Use lens hoods, paper, or your hand to block the light that is causing the flare. This works when the ...


10

Veiling glare is light that's not intended to be part of the image, per se, but ends up on the recording medium (film or sensor) anyway. It's caused by reflections and scattering of light by optical elements and the lens barrel. This produces an overlay of general brightness, which raises what should be the darkest parts, reducing overall image contrast. ...


8

"Good lighting" for outside pictures is pretty much dusk or dawn. If you're getting a harsh reflection of the sun at this point, you should be able to easily rotate a bit and get the sun out of your frame. In fact, some of the best light is just before the sun rises and just after it sets. There's still plenty of light to shoot with - especially for ...


6

A circular polarizing filter will go a long way to eliminate the reflected light from the water. But you might also want to go in the opposite direction, and try to work out a composition that embraces the reflection, rather than eliminate it. For example, longer exposures that turn the glints into something more silky might get you something nice.


5

Rubber Lens Hoods are available to use when shooting through glass. You place the front of the hood flat on the glass window and can then move the camera at various angles. Just be careful not to move the camera to a spot so that part of the rubber hood folds into the lens' field of view.


5

The usual way to reduce glare is to use a polarizing filter. You mount it to your lens and rotate it until the reflection is much less intense. A quality polarizer makes an enormous difference but it still cannot remove all glare in all cases. The approach you describe avoids reflection on the glass. It is restrictive the way you do it but you can also use ...


5

Yes, you use a polarising filter for that too. At a specific angle the polarising filter will let through 0% of the reflected light, and 50% of the rest of the light. Turned 90 degrees the filter will let through 100% of the reflected light, and 50% of the rest of the light.


5

Lens flare happens when light internally reflects within the lens itself. There are a few possible sources of internal reflection. You could get it from using a non-digital lens on a digital camera and getting reflection off the sensor (doesn't seem like the case here), you could get it off a filter placed on the front of the lens (light tends to bounce ...


4

A strong graduated ND filter can help reduce the intensity of the flare but wont eliminate it. The moon is by far the brightest object around at night so is inevitably going to be massively overexposed and cause flare. The only way to really achieve a normal looking moon would be to shoot two exposures, one for the cityscape and one for the moon and blend ...


4

A polarizer can make some reflections disappear or, if rotated 90 degrees, it can make the reflections stronger. In general, transparent materials, like window glass, water and even air, affect the polarization of reflections, but metallic reflectors do not. So, in answer to your questions: Depending on rotation of the filter, it can increase or decrease ...


4

They are the same as to effect. The circular type is actually a linear up front followed by a "retarder" filter. The first one does the deed and the second one scrambles the polarized light so it won't disrupt auto focus and metering functions.


4

Use a polarizing filter on your lens. That will help in daylight (if you rotate the filter to minimize glare). It probably won't do anything for the headlights though.


4

Reduce the power of the background light in relation to the overall image. A Blown up white image in a background should be just barely overexposed. If you are using a histogram on the camera take pictures from darker to lighter untill you just get the overexposure on the white and stop there. If you are using an incident lightmeter overexpose to 1 or 2 ...


4

Some lenses are more prone to this, those with a bulbous front element will flare easier and are more difficult to control. Some photographers that shoot a lot of sun/sunbursts buy lenses specifically for this purpose. The Canon 16-35mm f2.8 L II for example is known for well controlled flare and a beautiful sun star shape due to coating and the shape/number ...


4

This supplement to mattdm's answer contains a series of images to illustrate the effect that coating technology can have on veiling glare. They were all taken handheld with the camera set to the same settings with auto exposure enabled. There is a lamp shining toward the camera just outside the frame in the upper-left corner. All lenses were set to cover ...


3

You really can't. It's unfortunately unavoidable given the construction of lenses, which have several elements. The light bounces around between the elements.


3

If you don't have access to retake the photo using better lighting techniques, one method that might work with an existing photograph is frequency separation. It is often used when touching up portraits. Frequency separation is basically a way of separating the texture/details in the area of an image from the colors in the same area. You could use frequency ...


3

The anti-glare coating on the Dell U2711 is indeed problematic. Anti-glare coatings are used on a lot of screens, the majority of them in fact. Most professional grade monitors intended for high-end graphics use, such as for photographic editing, video editing, etc. usually have an anti-glare coating of some kind, although a few are glossy (no anti-glare/...


3

Are you still wanting to include the moon in the shot? If so, then think about how you control flare during the daytime and shooting into strong light sources. Use a hood to protect from off-axis flares that are outside of the field of view. Remove any non-multicoated filters from the light path as these are sources of flare. Stop down to improve ...


3

Glare as you put it is more formally known as a specular reflection. This occurs when you have smooth objects where all the light bounces off in the same direction. This contrasts with rough objects which due to fragments of the surface pointing in different directions, reflects light in different directions. Most objects like your apple produce both ...


3

I happen to frequently photograph artwork, including framed and with glass. If possible, do this in a room that has black walls and no windows. If such room is not accesible, wich is my case, I use a black backdrop BEHIND the camera. This helps a lot against unwanted reflections. Also, as the other answers point out, place the lights a 45 degree or more ...


2

How it's done in Photoshop A "layer" is created with a white gradient that goes from an opacity of nearly 100% to 0%. That gradient is done at the 2 o'clock angle you see. Then the layer is masked and a gradient is applied on top that makes it fade opacity from top-to-bottom starting at about midway (if you notice the bottom is more transparent than the ...


2

Besides the polarizing option you can iluminate the driver, probably having his window open and some difuse ligh to him. Take all precautions necesary please.


2

The rings may be a reflection of your lens off the back of a low-quality UV filter. (Look carefully, there are multiple rings.) You may confirm by retaking the picture without the filter. Avoid by taking pictures without the filter or by using a multi-coated filter. See What is causing the strange lighter circles in images taken with my Canon 15-85? ...


2

Yes, there is a form of spectrum distortion: At sunset the light from the sun has to pass through more atmosphere, which scatters the light, but this scattering effect is strong the higher the wavelength of light, therefore the blue end of the spectrum is scattered a lot more than the red, therefore the red end of the spectrum remains stronger at sunset ...


1

You may be able to improve it in your favorite photo editor: Convert to grayscale. Adjust contrast of the gray image your favorite techniques. Replace the luminosity of the original with the adjusted gray image. Use overlay or multiply to adjust the colors.


1

Back in the film days the standard technique was called Cross Polarization, and it looks like the technique is still in use. The basic idea is to have two light sources at wide (but not too wide) angles from the artwork with polarization screens that are oriented the same way. Then on the camera lens would be a polarizing filter would be rotated until the ...


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