50

I'm just terrified that if I make one wrong move, a hair or a piece of dust could fall in there, and then the camera will be irreparably damaged and I'll never be able to use it again. Fear not, young Padawan. Those of us who regularly use dSLRs can attest that simply having dust or hair fall into your dSLR body will NOT irreparably damage anything, and you ...


32

Film negatives are only light-sensitive while in the camera, until they are removed and processed. The processing includes a step to "fix" the image so that the negatives will not be further exposed by light. So once processed, film negatives (and slides) can be handled in daylight.


29

This might sound like a stupid question, but… is it actually “safe” to change the lens on the camera? Is this likely to destroy it? Changing lenses is quite safe for your camera, less so for your wallet. Once you see what your camera can do with different lenses, you'll want to start a small collection. Some lenses, like a typical 50mm f/1.8, are very ...


26

No, there is no danger. Any EM fields outside the microwave are very weak. There is no danger or risk. Microwaves are like visible light waves, except bigger (the "micro" is in comparison to other radio waves). Both are non-ionizing radiation; they don't have the energy to displace electrons in atoms. And, just like visible light, microwave radiation ...


24

There are reasons why broadcast studios, commercial film/video production studios, commercial photography studios, etc. have strict "no-smoking" policies and have had them for decades before the more recent trend to ban smoking in most public buildings as a public health issue: long term exposure to the byproducts of burning things can be severely damaging ...


22

Weather Sealing is protection of the internal parts of a camera from external influences such as moisture, dust, and humidity. The degree of this weather sealing varies between manufacturers and also within models by each manufacturer. The protection is provided by both rubber sealing with silicon rings and gaskets as well as design considerations such as ...


21

The camera interior of an SLR camera is not air tight. However condensation is not generally a problem when changing lenses outdoors. Condensation occurs when moving indoors due to a cold glass surface being in contact with warm moist air. When changing lenses outdoors the cold air is dry and so condensation will not form inside the camera. When taking ...


20

Like previously stated here by others, the shoe on most camera is pretty stable. However, the bottom of the flash is not as strong and you could very easily break it off. There was a co-work of mine at a paper whose whole bottom of the flash broke off just from holding his camera that way. He was fortunate that his D3 and 80-200/2.8 landed on top of a pad ...


18

Most DLSRs with "silent" or "quiet" shutter modes don't change the speed at which the shutter is operated at all. The transit time each curtain takes to traverse the height of the sensor is constant regardless of the exposure time (shutter speed) selected or if a "quiet" mode is selected. Exposure time is determined by the time difference between the ...


18

Definitely don't try to support the camera by its hotshoe. It's not designed for it. I don't think you should put anything at all on a hotshoe. Everything is so heavy and all the weight is pushing and pulling in all directions on that little joint. Even if your hotshoe is designed to do that, that's an insanely bad holder. Your camera is hanging off the ...


15

I wouldn't be concerned much about the camera body; there isn't really anything in it that would be very sensitive to vibrations. The only mechanical parts are the shutter and mirror, and both are in a safe postion when the camera is switched off. Lenses are a different matter: individual lens elements can and do become decentered, which can result in ...


14

May I hold the DSLR in part by the hotshoe flash? Yes, you may. Your attached photo perfectly demonstrates that you can hold the camera in this way. Will so holding my camera result in any unpleasant consequences? More than likely it will. In most cases the weakest link will be the part of the flash that connects to the camera's hot shoe. It's designed ...


13

A DSLR doesn't have a cellular or network connection, so there would be no way to have it report it's position. Some DSLRs include the serial number of the camera body in the EXIF meta data on an image, so if someone posted an image online with that meta data intact, there is a chance it might get indexed by something, but that's a long shot at best. It's ...


13

The best method I've found for general situations is: Turn your back to the wind (if it's raining or extremely windy you should seek additional shelter). Use a neck strap so you can let go of the camera. Select the next lens, remove the back cap and pocket it (choose a clean pocket). With the camera still hanging around your neck, with your free hand, press ...


12

The safest position for your SLR is in your bank's safety deposit box. Once you decide you want to take pictures, you must accept some non-zero risk of damage to your camera. Camera in bag with lens facing up: - Harder/slower to remove camera from bag. - If bag hits ground, you must ship the body off to repair the screen Camera in bag with lens facing ...


11

The ES-52 works a little differently than most lens hoods we are accustomed to seeing. Instead of blocking off-axis light by extending a cylinder or cone perpendicular to the image plane and centered around the optical axis, The ES-52 blocks extraneous light by placing a smaller circular opening parallel to the image plane. Due to the difference in design, ...


11

You are confusing weatherproof and freezeproof. Some digital cameras are weatherproof but not freezeproof, although all current freezeproof cameras are weatherproof. Weatherproof generally means that the camera can be splashed with water from any direction without water entering the camera. There are standards to measure this but most camera makers are ...


11

In some cases, using a hotshoe cover prevents the internal flash from popping up. Many Canon models had (currently have? I don't know) a microswitch in the hotshoe rails, that sensed the presence of a flash. Of course, the hotshoe cover's geometry looks just like the foot of a flash, so the camera thought an external flash was attached, and would not pop up ...


10

Contrarily to everyone here, I always check my tripod. It's too big even though it collapses to 42cm since it's almost 60cm long with the ball-head and leveling base. I do carry a Gorillapd SLR-Zoom in my carry-on for backup. I know someone who carries the head on their carry-on but its too much of a hassle for me. To make it easy, I shopped for a hard-...


10

I live in a very humid place. So my equipment has a high risk of getting fungus. What I do is, not keep it inside. Yes, you heard me right :). I use my camera frequently and expose it to sun every now and then (sunlight is a good anti-fungal solution). Apart from that when you are not using your camera for long, make sure you have the silica gel (active) ...


10

When attached to the camera and with the front lens cap on the camera will be pretty well protected from dust. Protecting against fungus is a matter of keeping everything dry. Placing everything in a sealed plastic bag is only a good idea if the temperature is kept warmer than when the bag is sealed. Air can hold a certain maximum amount of moisture ...


10

As long as you aren't pointing the camera at the sun, lasers etc. (see this question) You should be ok, at worst you'll get a completely over exposed image and the camera may give an over heating warning or the battery will run flat. This is based on the general consensus (google to the rescue): http://www.photographyblogger.net/six-common-myths-about-...


10

No! You want opaque lens caps because: Keep light out of the camera when not using it. In film cameras, the sensor is effectively always on. The shutter should in theory block all light, but stuff happens. With digital sensors, light hitting the sensor when not exposing doesn't corrupt the next picture, but you still want light not entering the lens ...


9

I highly recommend detaching it from the camera and storing it in a bag or a pocket while you are using your camera. It swings around too much and it gets in the way a lot. Having the take the cap off and put it back on also slows you down. So, once you have taken it off, only put it back on the camera when you are 100% sure you won't be needing your ...


9

Absolutely. Check out this instant-classic blog post from Lens Rentals, where low and high quality filters are compared in stacks to accentuate the effect. The short version is that both noticeably degrade IQ, but the cheap ones are a lot worse. Overall, consider if you need extra protection at all for the situation, avoid any filter when you can. See Is a ...


9

Not unless you drop the lens while removing it because you don't have enough hands to hold everything. Seriously, no you can't damage a Canon EOS lens using this procedure. Canon EOS lenses are designed in such a way that the diaphragm is moved in both directions by a micro servo attached to the diaphragm assembly. Unlike many lens designs, there are no ...


9

If it's bumping around you've packed it wrong, but it's highly unlikely to suffer. For running with a backpack even more than for hiking, your load should be stable. This means the bag shouldn't be too big and should be full or strapped up tight. If you're planning to run, then stop and shoot for a few minutes, you might find yourself wanting an extra ...


9

I've never used a hot shoe cover. I've shot outdoors with various cameras (Mostly Canon since the early 1990s) for several decades and never had an issue with a hot shoe that could be remotely related to not using a hot shoe cover. In fact, the only hot shoe related issue I can remember ever having was due to one of the contact springs on an outer rail ...


9

Cameras can be affected by fungus, but in real world usage they usually aren't as vulnerable as lenses. There are a few reasons for this. Most lenses that have a fungus issue have been stored for long periods in dark environments without being used. It usually takes months or even years for the fungus to become a significant problem. There are more of us ...


8

That's definitely fungus, and it's not going to go away. The first question to ask is it affecting your image quality. If it is not then control the problem, always keeping the lens in a dry environment. You could get it professionally cleaned, but honestly for that lens you could buy a replacement for a lot cheaper. You may also want to read about some ...


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