72

Ok, since you've asked for creative ways, here we go. Place the id card at the left side of the frame, take an under exposed photo with a long shutter time (5 seconds), fire a flash, turn the id card around and place it at the right side of the frame, fire the the flash a second time. We now have both sides of the id card in a single shot without any ...


66

Technique is typically at fault with "fuzzy" images 99% of the time with someone new to interchangeable lens cameras (ILC) with only a low-cost kit lens. The lens is not the problem. Low end kit lenses are limited, and they are cheap, and there are much nicer lenses around, but how you use one is more likely to be the fault than what glass is in the lens. ...


60

I actually just shot a photo just like this. This was shot around mid afternoon in downtown Portland and I assure you, there actually was traffic moving along the bridge. The set up included stacking an 18 stop ND filter on top of a polarizer and exposing the frame for 11 minutes, ish (707 seconds to be exact). As long as the people or cars keep moving, at ...


47

Well, you asked for creative, you didn't say practical: Gravitational lensing. Place the card edge on and behind a sufficiently massive body. Position the card and camera correctly and both faces will be visible, albeit substantially redshifted, one side worse than the other. Obtaining the sufficiently massive body (neutron star or black hole) to do so ...


41

One straightforward way to achieve this effect is to take multiple shots of the same scene and combine them using median blending. This technique is commonly used for noise reduction, and does it very effectively — so effectively, in fact, that it can even hide "noise" such as random people walking through the scene. What median blending effectively ...


40

they always ask me to do it. However, all of them commonly say that I cannot take nice photos It's weird that they don't like your work but continue to ask you to do it. Maybe there's some teasing/flirting going on? It's great that you want to improve your photography, though. Keep it up. There are a lot of conventions about what makes a good photo, and ...


38

Split the card along its thickness and photograph the halves side by side. Glue them back together if necessary. Alternatively, lose the card, have it replaced, and then find the original. Photograph the reverse of one with the obverse of the other.


32

If we start by just numbering them 1 - 6 for easy reference... Personally, I'd discount 5 altogether as it has none of the aspects we're looking for. 2 is a bit naïve & perhaps achieves a lot of its usable aspects almost by accident, however, because it does achieve some of them, let's keep it in consideration. 1 through 3 all have some element in the ...


30

"Expose to the right" means record the brightest image you can and then reduce the brightness in post to achieve the desired level. The word "right" comes from the histogram, where conventionally brightness increases left to right, thus increasing brightness shifts the whole histogram to the right. ETTR helps reduce noise simply by capturing more light, ...


26

The solution is simple. Give up on that sissy 35mm or digital stuff, and get your hands on some film for real photographers: 4x5 film! Then all you have to do is go in a dark room, wrap the film around the ID, and make a contact print (err... contact negative?) with a single strobe flash! If you can tune the flash correctly, there should be a difference ...


26

To elaborate on my earlier comment: One option (besides the photoshop one mentioned in comment by @Max) is using heavy ND filtration. This picture is a busy landmark in Prague, shot with a +10 ND filter. The total exposure time was two minutes. You can just about see people where they stopped for a while (these are tourists, so they most likely consulted ...


24

I have come across this previously and unfortunately, due to the world we now live in, I learnt that people in general have a somewhat distorted view of how they look and what their best look is on a photograph. People, everyday, see themselves as a reflection in a mirror where they are able to create looks that they find pleasing. These looks are often ...


23

In the good old days of film photography, when there was no exif, taking extensive notes was the only way of learning from your mistakes - considerable time passed between taking the picture, having your film developed and finally seeing your print. By that time your memory was not a reliable source of information. You can google up "Ansel Adams Exposure ...


22

This is normal because in the day time, the sky is usually the brightest part of the scene. If you lower the exposure by applying negative exposure compensation, your sky will get darker and more blue. This will cause other elements in the image to darken and some may end under-exposed. This is because a change in exposure is global. What you need is to ...


21

It can be done with a single shot on a smart phone. In this photo I stuck my "ID" (business card) on the end of a pen and started a panoramic shot with an iPhone. Once the card was out of shot, I flipped it and moved it so it would be back in shot again. I cropped the photo to remove superfluous background. Important to keep the card steady! You can see ...


18

The only options are: Buy a better tripod/head with significant over-provisioning. (i.e. if your camera were to weigh 2kg, don't get a head for say up to 3kg but up to 10kg.) Shield the camera from the wind. (Anything that keeps the wind from hiting the camera - something along the lines of the "tents" people use at beaches.) Use a weight below the tripod - ...


18

I guess the correct technique is long exposure + ND filter. The ND filter is used to allow for longer exposure time. Wherever long exposure is used, a tripod of some suitable substitute is a must. However, I want to contribute an alternative strategy: Compositing, for those cases where that technique is not feasible. I've taken shots in touristic locations ...


17

Okay, so, looking at the examples in your flickr gallery, including the ones from your parents' point and shoot camera, I see a number of things: You're seeing the effect of a smaller depth of field, which is more apparent with a larger sensor size. In this example, you are shooting at f/5.6 and 26mm, and it looks like you're pretty close to your subjects. ...


16

There were several techniques: Carry extra film backs (MF) or camera bodies (35mm) with different film loaded Push process lower ISO film to sacrifice fine grain in favor of perceived higher ISO Rewind the film already in the camera until just the leader is outside the canister, noting what frame you are on, then load a different roll. You can then reload ...


16

Yes, all those flashes are from people who don't know any better, usually using point and shoots or full auto mode. Those flashes do not help the resulting image in any way, but today's cameras (thankfully?) manage to get an acceptable image anyway (probably with the same settings it would have used for no flash auto mode), a few years ago each of those ...


15

Some "tricks" Ninja breathing, as above. Learn to hold breath at critical moment. Body braced in as stable a position as you can get it. "Think like a rock" :-) ie elbows in against body, head pulled down against body, "hunched" posture feet placed consciously firmly and maybe slightly spread. Brace against something !!! - Lamp post railing, corner of ...


15

It looks to me like they dragged the shutter. That is they set the shutter speed to something longish, but then used a flash. The model is illuminated by the flash with the camera still. Then after the flash has finished, the camera is rotated around the frame's center causing lights in the background to form the radially blurred pattern you see. The model ...


14

Based on how the second photo looks, my guess is that it was extremely dark and that they took a flash photo with a bulb exposure and then tilted the camera upwards to create the trails from the only lights in the room (which would have been the audio gear). This would leave the DJ well developed since he is only exposed during the flash and then expose the ...


14

While we often ask what resolution is needed for a certain print size, it no longer holds for things which are so large. What is key is resolution per angular extent, meaning how big do you expect people to see the billboard. That largely depends on how close viewers can get to it. A 20 foot billboard seen from 20 feet away looks pretty much the same as a 5 ...


14

As far as I understand photography, your main concern is to record or remember what exactly you wanted to achieve before pressing shutter release. That is, have something that helps you to compare what you wanted with what image you get at the end. In practical terms, for example, it might mean recording what you wanted to be exposed properly (more ...


14

The most important focal length for a wedding is the one you need at the time. Weddings cover a lot of different shots from a lot of different distances. Shooting a wedding on prime lenses is possible but tricky and requires a lot of planning of when you can get shots without missing something else, so it will be doubly hard for an amateur/first time ...


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