18

As you can see in the image below from the service manual, the volume behind these two features is occupied by the view finder assembly. Image source: manualslib.com Image source: manualslib.com The round hole is for one of the two optical paths of the range finder optics. The white rectangle is used as a light source for the frame line indications inside ...


17

It is a 70mm Graflex KE-4 “Combat Graphic” made from 1953-1957. Graflex KE-4 Combat Graphic


15

It isn't that rangefinders have struggled in the era of digital. It's that rangefinders struggled to survive the era of the SLR. The SLR started putting the rangefinder to bed long before digital came along. Canon produced its last rangefinder in the Canon 7 (introduced in 1961). Leica has gone upstream with their product and target market. They make highly ...


11

You can move your head around, and the frame will line up differently depending on your exact point of view. And wearing glasses, the frame will seem even smaller than without - because your eye is further away. Cropping is far easier than synthesizing something you thought would end up in frame, but actually didn't. The viewfinder on a rangefinder camera ...


11

Simple, it allows you to see exactly what the camera will "see" when you expose the shot. Nir has given you a part of the argument as well which is accuracy. In the "middle ground" of anything around mabye 20-100mm, building a rangefinder is not too difficult and Leica had adapters for longer and wider lenses if I am not mistaken. It takes some effort to ...


8

Yeah, that is definitely a dodgy shutter. On the Leica-like Canon 7, it is a pair of metal shutter curtains (instead of the classic Leica cloth curtains) that move horizontally across the frame,. If the timing is off on one or both, it can have this effect. If you are lucky, it is just old gunky lubricant that is the culprit. I guess you will have to bite ...


7

They are flash guide numbers (in meters, for ISO 100). This is for the QL17, but see Cameraquest, and check out the manual here (page 17). Apparently many rangefinder (and point and shoot) cameras of the day used the "Flashmatic" system, where the camera automatically selects an aperture to match your focus distance and flash power. So, set the ring to the ...


7

I don't remember seeing many popular rangefinder cameras at the dawn of the digital era. The main reason for the demise isn't digital-vs-film, but the pervasiveness of zoom lenses, for which they are not very well suited (you would need to couple the view finder to the zoom of the lens) and even worse interchangeable zoom lenses.


6

Rangefinders use two "viewports" in order to get the split image to aid in focusing. If you look closely you will see the second little window usually near the lens itself. It would be possible to reverse to the position of the two "viewports" but there would still be vertical parallax error. Since there will always be some form of parallax error, it is ...


6

According to this page, the IID2 has no flash capacity, while the IIS2 does. Quoting: The IID2, like the rest of the IID line has no flash capacity. Built through 1956, production was slightly over 16,000 units. Like the IIF, the IIF2 has flash provision for bulbs only, the slow speed dial has no X on it. Unlike the IIF, this was a low ...


6

I don't have a D3100, but everything I can find says that the electronic rangefinder is a manual focus aid. When the camera is in manual focus mode and you turn on the rangefinder, the exposure meter will indicate which way to turn the lens to focus. So you could turn it on when you want some help focusing manually.


5

I started out in the 80s with a similar rangefinder by Olympus and regularly got great results with Kodak's black and white Tri-X. Now available as 400TX this is a fast yet fine grained film that can handle push-processing well. It captures nice high contrast which will help bring the best out of overcast conditions. An old rule of thumb you can start with ...


5

Mirrorless fills this niche in a lot of ways, and particularly as EVFs and sensors have gotten better, the downsides to that have narrowed. The "rangefinder" in "rangefinder cameras" refers to these cameras' unique system of manual focus. I've used a digital Leica a little bit, and at least without a lot of practice, my impression is that while this may be ...


4

It's probably what we call "broken". It sounds like the shutter release mechanism might be stuck in the release-it-now position.


4

Yes, you are correct, I found this dire warning: "and you shouldn’t clean the colored (usually yellow) glass or the color is likely to come off and then no more double-image in your rangefinder!" on Matt's Classic Cameras web page about repairing rangefinders. I would assume that you would need to ask a professional rangefinder camera restorer to ...


3

No, that is not parallax error, that's remapping distortion and is perfectly normal for a panorama that wide. When you have an image on a flat plane, you can't actually get more than a 90º field of view, without some distortion. When you do scene coverage that's wider than that, then the image has to be remapped to a flat plane from the spherical view. ...


3

One advantage of having the viewfinder on the top left corner of the camera is that you can get your right eye very close to the viewfinder without having your nose bump against the back of the camera as happens with most SLRs. It also makes it easier to keep your left eye open to keep tabs on your surroundings while looking through the viewfinder, since it ...


3

It looks to me like the turning action of the focus ring (from infinity to close) causes the gold coloured inner ring to move forwards with the lens arrangement. As can be seen in the link provided by 2012rcampion in a comment: closest focusing distance infinity: Looking now at the diagram this allows the small arm which pushes on the back of this to ...


3

Simple — you can't make an exchangeable lens rangefinder where the viewfinder is even remotely accurate. (Well, you can't without digital technology and live view — and then the mirrorless cameras makes more sense than rangefinders.)


3

Shutter for certain. Looks like the second (trailing) curtain is catching up to the first (leading) curtain; they should stay evenly spaced. Have it serviced and use it for another few decades!


3

Rangefinder cameras are compact because they do not need extra room for a mirror. The mirrorlessness is accomplished by having one optical path for a photosensitive medium (film here) and another for the photographer. Pros: Compact design Instant preview, no image processing. Cons: Photo slightly offset from the rangefinder Different optics for ...


2

Try the BosStrap. It attaches to one of the side eyelets. So your tripod mount stays free.


2

There is a test for that, expose for a long time and remove lens in the middle of the shot. You might see part of the shutter still ends engaged. It might be dangerous for the camera of lens and you might brake it-i did it a couple of times and broken nothing, just be careful. If the camera or lens in still under warranty, don't do it!


2

Its tradition. When we had film cameras, a mirror system was used to give the photographer an accurate image of what the lens was seeing irrespective of which lens was attached. Obviously one could have a system with a live viewer. Old time photographers are used to looking in a view finder and composing an image.


2

How can I learn to shoot with "the other" eye? Lots and lots of practice. It sounds like you have a head start if you are used to using your left eye but are actually right eye dominant. I also recommend that you practice shooting with both eyes open. This post has a lot of great information: How can one learn to shoot with both eyes open, and what are the ...


2

Definitely looks like a damaged shutter blind-this can happen if you don't use a lens cap on sunny days the sun will burn the blind via the lens


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