22

That's not correct. Look at this picture: The green rectangle is a 36x24 sensor. The green circle, which has a diameter of 43.3mm, is the minimal light spot needed for that size. The blue square is 36x36 sensor. The blue circle, which has a diameter of 50.9mm, is the minimal light spot needed for that size. As you can see a lens suitable for 36x24 does not ...


16

It is a 70mm Graflex KE-4 “Combat Graphic” made from 1953-1957. Graflex KE-4 Combat Graphic


12

I think you are talking about the 4x5 Graflex Speed Graphic that David Burnett was shooting with. http://www.lomography.com/magazine/lifestyle/2012/08/09/david-burnett-an-analogue-view-of-the-olympics


12

"Format" refers to the size of the recording medium in a camera. I say recording medium because the term originated in the film era and has continued to the digital age. There are no hard limits but medium format is typically anything larger than 35mm film up to 6cmx7cm film. Large format is typically everything from 4"x5" up. In addition to the size of ...


11

I don't know medium format cameras, but in general shutter latency is the time that it takes from when you push the shutter to the time the shutter actually activates. The lower the latency, the more responsive the shutter, but the less time the camera has to make last minute adjustments or changes in hardware state. A higher shutter latency will allow the ...


11

Advantages of Hasselblad medium format compared to the best 35mm systems (applies to most medium format systems): Larger lenses means sharper optics (when measured across the whole image circle). Higher resolution sensors currently available. Modularity, backs, viewfinders are interchangeable allowing you to upgrade independently. Hasselblad offers a few ...


9

Is it possible and why it has not been done yet ? Not necessarily. A 24x36mm sensor will easily fit in an image circle that's too small for a 36x36mm sensor. Specifically, a 24x36mm sensor requires a minimum diameter of about 44mm to cover the sensor. A 36x36mm sensor would require an image circle of about 51mm diameter. A square sensor is certainly ...


8

Phase One says the sensor is put to sleep to save battery, and is given a wake-up signal when you press the shutter release button. This wake-up process they call Shutter Latency and recommend to keep it set to "Normal". The other setting is called "Zero" latency, and suggested to use it only when working with technical large format cameras, or certain ...


8

There's quite a bit of difference, actually. Size of the Negative Medium format is a somewhat encompassing term. When one talks about 35mm (135 film), it's most often a camera that shoots a 36mmx24mm frame. There have been specialty cameras that use the 135 format to shoot other sizes, but most 135 cameras shoot this fairly standard sized frame. Medium ...


8

The rangefinder only supports framing (with parallax), the dual-lens reflex also supports focussing. This assumes that both lenses move in tandem, and that the picture through the upper lens is viewed on ground glass.


7

Price: Not everyone can afford the price of a medium format camera and back. High end studios can afford them and their clients will pay for the quality. Price: Not everyone can afford the lenses that medium format cameras use, which is often far more than a comparable lens for a DSLR. Ditto about the studios. Sensitivity: I asked the Phase One rep ...


7

This is a Linhof Super Technika IV 6×9. (Usage rights of photos at cameraquest.com do not allow reuse of images, so I can't upload an image here).


7

Online, your simplest and easiest options are to google on the name of the camera and "user manual", or to find out if the manufacturer still exists and has a website and look through their support/downloads sections and/or to contact them directly. Or you may want to start scouring eBay. Ephemera, such as manuals, are often sold to collectors as well as ...


6

Basically - Medium format cameras are generally big, and designed primarily for studio environments, therefore designed to be used in a "controlled environment" where lighting can be set up with enough light for perfect exposure. There is really no need for digital medium format cameras to have extreme high ISO performance. You don't see many night club ...


6

Normally I would recommend a geared head for precision work, particularly for a heavy camera, but I assume $1000 is your total budget. So, instead, you should look at a Hydrostatic head. This will prevent shifting while tightening the ballhead but you still need to support the camera's weight while adjusting its position. Carbon Fiber legs are awesome but ...


6

The "telecompressor" you mentioned is a focal reducer, a device that concentrates the image in order to project it onto a smaller sensor. This approach reduces the backfocus distance (the distance from the back of the lens to the sensor). So it only works on mirrorless cameras using lenses designed for DSLRs (which have sufficient backfocus distance to make ...


6

I don't think you can determine what specific camera left the observed notches, because it's not a feature or property of the camera's construction. Rather, it's a part of the construction of the film holder. The image you link to is a print of an uncut negative. The notches are simply the part of the film that is left visible by the rails of the film ...


5

$20 is very reasonable. Consider this: Digital >> Shoot >> Cull >> Edit >> Prepare >> Deliver (takes A LOT of YOUR time depending on project size) Film >> Shoot >> Send >> Receive >> Review >> Deliver (takes few hours, if that, you go spend that time, shooting, with family or whatever) If you are looking for quality lab, then look no further than http://...


5

Prestige, legacy or resolution: To show you can own something so expensive. In some market this will give you an edge to get clients to pay for the prices you ask for. To use your legacy cameras and lenses. This could be for sentimental reasons more than practical, I suspect, since if you can afford a Hasselblad, you can probably afford new gear too. The ...


5

Size, weight, speed and price. If you are going to carry equipment with you for the entire day you want it to be small and light enough to carry (and a price that won't bankrupt you if the camera is damaged is a big plus when you take a camera into dangerous areas). Also, for sports, event photography and photojournalism the shooting speed is very ...


5

Larger formats exist mainly to increase the level of detail in the photographs produced. This was certainly true in the film era as film resolution was pretty much fixed (per unit area) but a larger negative could always produce more detailed prints. It is also largely true in the digital age as the highest megapixel sensors available are all larger than ...


5

Theoretically if you keep the size of the entrance pupil and field of view the same then you will capture the same total amount of light regardless of the format. If your medium format sensor in 1.6 times larger (which is the upper end available today, the Leica S2 you mention is only 1.25 times larger), then to match your 35mm DSLR and 85mm f/1.2 lens ...


5

The sensors could be made to a square format (though the current diameter would not accommodate 36x36mm, it would need to be about 30mm) if there was a demand for it. But by that logic the question we may actually need to be answering is why aren't sensors circular given that lenses present a circular image? There were some attempts at circular sensors in ...


5

Some reasons: 1) Sharpness. 2) Size... If you have a 80Mpx image you need point 1 first. 3) Dynamic range improved dynamic range seems unimportant using controlled lighting Seems unimportant..., unless you need it. If you are taking a photo of a well known actor or actress, you want to squish the more information you can get from your image. A medium ...


5

Historically, product photos were taken with large format cameras so that perspective distortions could be corrected by bending the film plane with respect to the image plane. Nowadays we can easily correct for keystone distortions using software. Additionally, distortion correction requires enormous depth of field. Apertures of f32 and smaller also mean ...


5

Once one understands the advantages of a medium format camera it becomes obvious that there are situations that such a camera would make sense. It is unlikely that a client will specifically request such a camera, but it is possible that the needs require resolution, sharpness, dynamic range, and contrast that you may only be able to achieve with a medium ...


5

Of course there are some cons. If there weren't, everybody would do it all the time. :-) For some obvious cons, consider that a medium format lens will almost always be: larger heavier more expensive, and lower resolution ...than a lens built specifically for 35mm. As for the specific questions you asked: Can the greater field of view be a source of ...


5

Assuming your end product is a digital image (i.e. not a paper print) the steps of your workflow are simple: develop the film scan the images As for developing: it is important to consider Black & White and Color films as separate realms. black & white film is on one hand comparatively easy to develop - you need just three baths (developer / ...


5

I have a Rolleiflex 3.5F and I love it. It's so much fun to use, and results are always pleasing. Strangers are always interested in it, and are often happy to pose for photographs. Try that with a cellphone! According to the photo.stackexchange.com Help section, "questions should be reasonably scoped. If you can imagine an entire book that answers your ...


4

TwoThree Several important things Hasselblad brings vs Canon and Nikon are: Hasselblad uses a CCD sensor (instead of CMOS) which offers several quality improvements 16 bit image files (Canon and Nikon are 14 bit) No anti alias filter, this improves sharpness at the cost of increasing chance of moire (the Nikon D800e now has no AA filter though, so that ...


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