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16

The original cameras didn't use film at all, so there was no noise from any film advance mechanism. Instead they used materials that were inserted in the back of what we now refer to as view cameras while being protected from exposure to light. Each image required changing out the entire back of the camera and replacing it with another glass plate that had ...


16

It is called a slide viewer. Unlike photographic negatives, where the darkest parts of the image are lightest and vice-versa, photographic slide film produced a positive image directly on the film that could be viewed as is. "Slide" film is more properly called reversal film. Color slides are sometimes called "color reversal film" because not only are the ...


14

According to this NASA PDF, Apollo 7 and 8 did not take hand-held cameras, instead using vehicle mounted Maurer or custom-built cameras. Apollo 9 had a Hasselblad Superwide, Apollo 10 had no hand held cameras, and Apollos 11 through 13 had custom built Hasselblad Lunar Data Cameras. Apollos 11 and 12 also had a 'Closeup Stereo ALSCC' camera. There is a ...


13

It's Polaroid Land Camera 1000. It's obviously not classic SX-70 because it's not SLR, it has see-through viewfinder.


12

I'm not too sure about your mount questions, but I do collect working vintage gear. Here's what I do and look for... If applicable, bring a battery - There's really no excuse not to bring a fresh battery for the camera you're interested in. Bring a pen light - your cellphone light may also work. You just want to be able to really see inside the nooks and ...


11

That is a Contax G1 interchangeable lens autofocus rangefinder camera.


10

Check the battery holder. If the old batteries have been taken out you might be fine. One of the risks with older equipment is battery corrosion. If the old batteries have not been taken out they may have started to leak causing damage to the contacts inside the camera body.


9

Six-20, also known as 620, is the film size that fits your camera. The film itself was the same as the more standard 120 film. The only difference is the size of the spool upon which it is wound. A 120 spool will not fit in most 620 cameras. Unfortunately, no one currently produces 620 film. If you have two 620 sized spools you can wind 120 film onto 620 ...


9

It might. It might not, it all depends on how the camera was used/abused, and how it was stored. Age can affect things like the light-tightness of rubber seals, sticky grease on aperture blades, and shutter timing. The mercury battery the camera was designed to use is no longer available, and you'll have to find a substitute. And bad storage may allow ...


9

That's actually an L1BC filter (ell one bee cee). It's equivalent to a Skylight 1A, and is meant to cut UV with film. It's of very limited use with digital; primarily to reduce blue-channel overexposure at high altitudes. With colour film, particularly transparencies (slides), it's a slightly more aggressive version of a "clear" UV filter useful when the ...


8

Yeah, that is definitely a dodgy shutter. On the Leica-like Canon 7, it is a pair of metal shutter curtains (instead of the classic Leica cloth curtains) that move horizontally across the frame,. If the timing is off on one or both, it can have this effect. If you are lucky, it is just old gunky lubricant that is the culprit. I guess you will have to bite ...


8

There are some warnings about using different types of non-mercury replacement batteries. In this flickr thread, there are a few suggestions: Use the WeinCell MRB625 replacement battery for PX625/PX13. This is designed as a drop-in replacement for the OM-1, and even says so on the packaging. Get 1.3V hearing-aid batteries from the drug store. Apparently ...


8

I'm assuming that you are unwinding part of the roll before you have it developed to check the images. The term here is "latent image." There is a chemical change in the film when light strikes it, but it has to go through a development process (a series of chemical baths) to make the image visible (normally, Wikipedia has an example of a visible latent ...


8

That's a slide viewer - the "little white squares" are 35mm photographic slides. I have one just like the one in the picture - it's a nice way of checking slides before putting them into a projector or scanner. More expensive versions would look like a miniature TV and have battery power, but it's been a while since I've seen any of those.


7

This is a 8mm movie camera made in Japan about 1956. That was about the date that home movies peaked. Like all 8mm cameras of that period, this camera was loaded with “double 8” film. This is actually 16mm wide movie film with sprocket holes on both sides. This film came wound a metal spool. You loaded the film spool in subdued light. You then began taking ...


7

Online, your simplest and easiest options are to google on the name of the camera and "user manual", or to find out if the manufacturer still exists and has a website and look through their support/downloads sections and/or to contact them directly. Or you may want to start scouring eBay. Ephemera, such as manuals, are often sold to collectors as well as ...


6

Despite the D90 being a full two years older than the D3100 I think it still holds up against the newer model. The D90 does exposure and white balance bracketing, not achievable with the D3100. Also the screen on the D90 is superior, with 920,000 dot resolution vs the 230,000 of the D3100. One area the D90 falls down is in video - if you want to use ...


6

Japan was not the only country making cameras and lenses in the 1970's and 1980's but they had a huge market share. (they still do) Before World War II most good cameras were made in Germany. Japanese companies started making copies of German cameras in the late 1930's and by the time the war ended, these Japanese cameras were very good quality. In the ...


6

It really depends on the individual camera and how it has been stored. Before sourcing a film to run through it, gently try the wind on feature and shutter to see if they work. If things are stiff do not try to force them!


6

The Olympus 35DC is a rangefinder with an automatic shutter (electronically controlled). I have a couple cameras which are quite similar--the Yashica Electro 35 GSN and the Canon Canonet G-III 17. First, you should be able to wind the camera (no need to waste film), press the shutter release, and see the shutter snap open and close. If not, something may ...


6

To render this answer more generally useful, I will first give some general tests to perform not specific to your particular model of camera: If the camera needs a battery, get one and pop it in. For an initial test, it needn't necessarily even be the exact same battery, as long as the voltage is close enough. (Some old cameras were designed to take ...


5

As to why Japan was/is so successful a lens-making nation, the summary in this excellent thesis answers your question pretty well: http://www.academia.edu/891283/Rivalry_and_Cooperation_How_the_Japanese_Photography_Industry_Went_Global Edit: in a nutshell, the thesis linked here identifies that Japan benefitted from considerable market protection put in ...


4

I really wouldn't call that an upgrade - the D3100 is technically a superior camera - faster processor, higher pixel count, better sensor tech, the only things in the (quite old) D90 are the AF motor and the screen resolution. So assuming you dont want to use older lenses without internal AF drive, then yes, this would be a downgrade. http://en.wikipedia....


4

The model introduced in the year 2000 is referred to as the PowerShot S100 Digital ELPH in North America, but the Digital IXUS in Europe and most of Asia, and finally the IXY Digital in Japan. The model introduced in the year 2011 is referred to as the Powershot S100 and as far as I can tell this name is kept throughout the world. It is possible to consider ...


4

A metal leaf shutter of an old rangefinder camera has relatively low sound. I have no decibel numbers to show, but I'd estimate the emitted sound to be only one fifth of the sound an SLR camera makes with shutter and mirror slap. Here is a Youtube video I just recorded and uploaded. Tune up the volume on your speakers. Shutter sounds of an SLR camera and a ...


4

127 film can be purchased, in colour only, from Bluefire Labs in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Price isn't bad... the 127 film is $9.89. At this point they appear to be the only ones making 127 film in any format, so unless you want to pay substantial ebay prices for end of life film (which may take interesting shots), I don't see better options. EDIT As a ...


4

Fujifilm's recent cameras take their design cues from rangefinder cameras of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. At that time, a look similar to this was typical, just as DSLRs in the 2000s tended to be rounded blobs of black plastic or today's smartphones are mostly shiny black rectangles. Therefore, there are many candidates, but I think perhaps the closest is ...


4

It would seem to be a standard Polaroid 600 in a colour that this dude on flickr refers to as Party Blue. Indeed searching for Polaroid 600 Party Blue on Google yields many results showing that camera. According to the Polaroid page on the Camerapedia wiki it belongs to the Polaroid 600 One Step Flash (Close Up) family and it is indeed known under the ...


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