Hot answers tagged

28

I have the same lens. Your front element is not broken From your photo it looks like only a protective filter (UV?) broke. Notice the letters saying "16-35mm". They are printed on the outside of the lens, not behind the front element. It appears the filter mount ring is still attached, making the front of the lens look a little deeper than normal. ...


22

Taking apart lens to fix yourself isn't usually a good idea. Due to the precision in optics, lens assembly is only ever really done by professionals who know what they're doing, have access to equipment and usually work in a clean room (plus more importantly can put it back together again.) Sadly being the 18-55 and what it is, it wouldn't be cost effective ...


20

If you need to ask what kind of screwdriver you need to disassemble a lens you probably shouldn't consider taking your lens apart. It's highly unlikely you'll ever be able to get it together again properly. If you insist on trying it anyway, then proceed at your own risk. We won't accept responsibility for turning your lens into a paperweight. You need ...


15

How to disassemble / take apart Fujifilm X-T1 and how to disable ISO Dial lock switch. It is relatively easy to take apart FujiFilm X-T1. You only need one type of screwdriver, although the screws themselves are different. So as usual, make sure to have several small containers and a piece of paper to write down/draw where a particular screw came from. It ...


14

The first thing you need to ask yourself is, "Am I sure the only damage to the lens is to the mounting flange?" The second thing you need to ask yourself is, "Considering the cost of a new EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 is only around $200 and a used one can be found for half that, why would I consider sending the lens in for a repair that will likely cost near that ...


13

Solved. I accidentally placed the focusing screen by flipping it on other side which made in focus objects blurry. I corrected it and it's back to normal now.


12

There is a little microswitch in the hotshoe that detects an external flash -- this may have become stuck, or got a piece of grit blocking it. If you cannot see anything under the rails, you may have to take it to your local friendly Canon authorised repair centre, but if you can see some grit, you may be able to carefully remove it with a cocktail stick or ...


12

After trying as few things and playing around with the flash with no success, I found the following thread on the web. The advice given is : Rub all the battery contacts very briskly with a clean rag that is just ever so slightly damp. I actually works! To rub the terminals inside the battery compartment I wrapped a thin, slightly damp rag around the ...


12

I'm answering the question based on if it wasn't the UV filter you broke, in case anyone stumbles here in the future. Can I get it repaired? This honestly depends on the age of the lens. For example the Canon 16-35 f2.8L (mark I) was discontinued in about 2007. Replacement parts may not be easy to come by, and due to front element diameter, definitly ...


11

The 99% likely best answer is, of course, to send it to a competent camera repairer. Odds are 'It's broken'. However, just in case, and very very unlikely, try the following. These have almost no chance of being successful, but in a few cases may work: Remove & replace lens. Is mirror stuck up? If so, DO NOT TRY to move it. Take to repairer. If ...


10

It is likely that your computer is infected with a worm that automatically copies itself to removable media to try and spread. When you format the card, it may be briefly clean, but it would rapidly get reinfected by the worm. It is possible the worm only uploads itself to the card when inserted in the computer. Try formatting the card, if virus scan then ...


10

There are two main possibilities I can think of. The easiest is that you may have inadvertently adjusted the diopter setting on your view finder. This would make the entire thing look slightly blurry. If this is the problem, fixing it should be as simple as adjusting the diopter dial near the viewfinder itself. The other potential problem is that the ...


10

If the scratches don't affect the optical performance of the lens sufficiently to be perceptible in your photos the best course of action you could take is to do nothing. It takes a LOT of damage from scratches or fairly sizeable obstructions before they become noticeable! These photos from Roger Cicala's blog entry at lensrentals.com illustrate just how far ...


10

Need this lens cleaned by next weekend! Please help!! No you don't. You need this type of lens or similar one by next weekend, but not exactly this unit. Chances are something goes wrong during your "repair" and you have no lens at all. Your best bet is to look for a replacement for the upcoming gig in the form of a bought replacement unit or a rented one. ...


10

Check if you can somehow get this replaced/repaired for free by some expert due to warranty, insurance, etc. That would be the best solution. Find out the price that an expert repair costs or at least get an estimate and compare it to what a used lens costs. To know what the prices are for a non DIY solution. Take a flat srew driver or any other stiff/rigid ...


9

The first one isn't a setting/exposure issue as there are stripes/lines across the picture. From my technical experience, I'm willing to bet it's a faulty image sensor. If you Google images "faulty ccd", you can see very similar results. This fault isn't necessarily caused by damage to the camera but just simply due to the image sensor failing. Although I ...


9

That's how it's meant to look. Refer the manual from Canon's website, page 23: Refer also p36: the top LCD should be the same.


8

There is really no way to remove scratches. You would destroy the optical coatings long before the scratch was gone. Scratches on the front element have almost no effect on image quality, but you may get additional flare under certain lighting conditions. Many people use a black marker to fill in the scratch so it becomes more flare resistant.


8

Both the official Canon replacement part and many of the third party replacement parts offered on eBay show 3M tape already attached to the back of the replacement grip. I'd follow their lead as others have suggested and use 3M VHB, 3M 300LSE, or 3M 200MP (for other grips on the 550D), as it seems to be what Canon and third party makers use. Or you could ...


7

The only course of action here is to get the lens professionally serviced. Once mould spores have got into your lens and started to grow like this there is no other way to get rid of them. In order to prevent this in the future always store your camera in a sealed bag with a couple of sachets of silica granules to absorb any moisture that may have got into ...


7

Just a note. I found this thread while researching the same issue, though the range that wouldn't focus for me was more like from 80ish to 200. After reading the comment by GRM, I investigated my lens and found the front element to actually be loose, having backed out on its threads. As I never take the UV filter off, I never would have found this with ...


7

If you want to replace the whole grip, sugru is one of the best custom grip/almost anything DIY putty that you can get. It will definitely be able to replace a small grip on a camera


7

F-mount lenses are locked in place by a small metal pin that pulls flush with the lens mount when you press the lens release button. This pin would be in the three-o'clock position when you're looking where the lens mount would be. On auto-focus bodies like your D90, there's a second pin for the focus motor that does the same, and it's at the seven-o'clock ...


7

The usual coating of photographic paper consists of (hardened) gelatin, together with a lot of other chemicals. Unless it has some extra protectional coating as described on this wikipedia image the gelatin is directly exposed to the environment, and if you ever have used gelatin for baking or cooking, it gets a bit sticky when wet, and dissolves ...


7

I would throw it away and buy a replacement. Even if I could fix it, I don't think I'd trust it to hold my camera. If it breaks again with the camera on it, the camera may only fall a few inches or a foot; after all, it's a mini-tripod. But, what if it breaks and the camera falls those few inches, then falls several feet off of the object you had the tripod ...


7

Given that you're talking water damage, and that the lens is probably already trashed, I'm not sure you can do any more harm to the lens if it's not working at all. An 18-55 kit is cheap enough that nearly anything totals it. Just be sure that you've made peace with the fact that you're just as likely, (or more, if you're inexperienced with electronics and ...


7

If I were you, I'd go ahead and buy another battery on Amazon. If a new battery fixes it, dispose of your old one, and you're good for $15. If not, it might be an internal problem and you'd probably have to send it to Canon. Edit Per OP's comment, the problem seems to have been narrowed down to whether the memory card is inserted or not. Try it with a new ...


7

Sadly, you can't, without taking them apart to find out. Unfortunately, it's not reliable to assume anything about the construction of photographic equipment. Even if two instances of what is marketed as the same lens contain optically identical elements, which isn't always guaranteed, you may find that a bevel on the edge of a particular element (or ...


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