43

You're probably better off with native-mount lenses For the most part, no, you can't mix'n'match lenses from different brands of cameras, because they'll usually use different mount systems. The mount system specifies how the lens and camera body physically link, and may also specify electronic communication between the lens and camera. If the lens and ...


23

There are two hard limits on how fast a lens can be: The first is a thermodynamic limit. If you could make a lens arbitrarily fast, then you could point it to the sun and use it to heat your sensor (not a good idea). If you then get your sensor hotter than the surface of the Sun, you are violating the second law of thermodynamics. This sets a hard limit at f/...


22

Your lens is a Yashica ML 50mm f/1.9. The one pictured below is a more recent version of the same lens. The mount is the CONTAX/Yashica mount. Yashica revived the Contax name over a decade after production of any Contax rangefinder cameras and lenses in Germany had ended. Yashica chose to officially market the line as 'CONTAX' (always in all capital letters)...


17

if I use the auto-focus, does it adjust the lens focus, or is there a secondary lens in the body that gets adjusted? No, there's no secondary lens. The lens attached to the camera contains a motor that moves the lens elements as required by the autofocus system. Same with the aperture settings, is this changing on the attached lens, or is there another ...


16

The most important thing you'll need to know is the "lens mount" that both your lenses and your body use - examples here are Canon EF, Nikon F and Micro Four Thirds. Once you've done that, you'll need to find the flange focal distance (FFD) for both the lens and the body - handwaving slightly, the flange focal distance is how far the lens needs to be from ...


15

First: Sony doesn't necessarily disagree with Nikon's claim. It's just that Sony designed their 'E' mount with a throat diameter of 46.1 millimeters at a time when it appeared it would be an APS-C only mount for the NEX series of compact mirrorless ILCs. Sony later made the decision to move into full frame territory using the all-electronic 'E' mount, ...


14

The first thing you need to ask yourself is, "Am I sure the only damage to the lens is to the mounting flange?" The second thing you need to ask yourself is, "Considering the cost of a new EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 is only around $200 and a used one can be found for half that, why would I consider sending the lens in for a repair that will likely cost near that ...


10

I'm sure each manufacturer has a specification for the amount of force along several axes that their lens mounts need to be able to accommodate, but they don't seem to publish that data. They are probably not published because in the real world it is a specification that is not practically needed. It is fairly simple to understand why. Which to support (...


10

Check if you can somehow get this replaced/repaired for free by some expert due to warranty, insurance, etc. That would be the best solution. Find out the price that an expert repair costs or at least get an estimate and compare it to what a used lens costs. To know what the prices are for a non DIY solution. Take a flat srew driver or any other stiff/rigid ...


10

Using your thumb and forefinger on each hand, make a finger frame, and hold it out at arms length. Now imagine that your entire field of view is limited by the bounds of this finger frame. Anything outside of the frame is not visible to you. If you wanted to see a larger (wider) field of view, you have two options: Move the finger frame closer to your eye....


9

The Sigma 70-300 mm F4-5.6 DG APO Macro is a lens that is available for both Sigma cameras and as a third party lens for many other brands, among them Nikon. These different manufacturers uses different lens mounts and this particular lens is available for Canon EF, Nikon F (FX), Pentax KAF, Sigma SA Bayonet and Sony/Minolta Alpha mounts. These mounts are ...


9

I think you've got a Minolta A-mount lens. Compare to this photo (image borrowed from here): Minolta and Konica merged at some point and were subsequently acquired by Sony, and this mount is apparently still used by Sony as the "Alpha mount system".


9

Will the sigma 17-55mm 2.8 lense fit my full frame canon 6d ? The lens that I think you're talking about is the Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC (OS) HSM. Although any lens with an EF mount will fit your 6D, the "DC" designation means that the lens is designed for APS-C sensors rather than full frame, so the image won't cover the entire sensor. If you're looking ...


9

This is a "process" lens used to make copies on high contrast film for reproduction in newspapers, magazines, and books. The lens mounted on a square wood board with hole for the lens. The lens mounted with wood screws. On some, the board was metal, usually aluminum. If an aluminum mount was used it was also called a lens board. The lens mounted to metal ...


8

As Caleb pointed out, all focus and aperture-related functions (as well as optical zoom when relevant) happen inside the lens, not in the body (in terms of lens components moving at least, not talking about the logic and control). Nowadays most lenses will have built-in motors to perform these tasks, and are controlled electronically by the body through the ...


8

Like most mirrorless systems, the RF mount has relatively short flange focal distance, of only 20mm, as opposed to 44mm of EF (and EF-S). This has a number of optical advantages, better allows for adapted lenses, and is just plain smaller. Additionally, the new mount has a slightly wider throat diameter, about which Canon says: With a large 54mm lens ...


7

You cannot mount an EF-M Lens on a standard DSLR or at least it won't work the way you want it to. The EF-M lenses are designed to sit closer to the sensor than on a DLSR. There is no way to get the EF-M lens closer to a DSLR sensor because the mirror is in the way. You can however, put a DSLR lens on the EOS-M camera with what is essentially a spacer to ...


7

No. All Canon cameras that accept EF-S lenses are also 100% compatible with EF lenses. A camera having an EF-S mount simply means that you can also attach EF-S lenses to it - the limiting factor is the camera, not the lens, as the rear element of EF-S lenses may extend so deep into the mirror box as to obstruct the movement of the mirror of an EF mount ...


7

No. There are several problems here. This lens looks a lot like the Senko 50mm f/0.95, i.e., it is a C-mount lens for 1" format video. This lens vignettes even on micro four-thirds (2x crop). There's no way the image circle will cover an APS-C or full-frame camera, and the registration distance is much much smaller than that of Nikon F. In order to get the ...


7

If you read Canon's public statements at the time the EOS system/EF mount was introduced in the late 1980's, they spoke of the longer 44mm registration distance and larger diameter flange of the EF mount, when compared to their existing FD mount that had a registration distance of 42mm, as leaving room for future capabilities. If they had been concerned with ...


7

Short answer: Yes. The models all have DX sensors, and since the lenses were bought for a D5300/D5200, they'll likely have an AF motor built in, so you won't have problems mounting them on any other Nikon DX camera, including D7000/D7100.


7

Your camera is an interchangeable lens camera. You can buy other lenses with the Nikon mount and use any of them. That includes lenses with VR — vibration reduction — even if the lens which came with the camera does not have that feature. Note that entry-level Nikon cameras like yours do not have focus motors built into the body, so assuming you want auto-...


7

X-Fujinon says it all - that's Fujica X-mount, the one Fuji used on their SLR cameras from the early 1980s, before current mirrorless X-mount. Fujica X-mount has focal flange depth of 43.5mm, so there is no way to effectively use this lens on Canon EF-mount body since EF-mount had bigger focal flange depth of 44mm - there is no way to achieve focus to ...


7

Since the adapter moves the lenses further from the sensor, I’d imagine that the coverage of the lens would be larger, and that the adapter or body alters focus to compensate. Is this thinking correct? No, because the adapter doesn't move the lenses further from the sensor in an RF mount camera than the lens is when attached directly to an EF mount camera. ...


6

Since you also mention video, I assume you want to mount them on a DSLR. It's not pointless (especially given the saving), but... the result might not be what you expect. This depends of course on the quality of the lens : an excellent one could still perform quite correctly. And maybe tack sharp is not what you need, depending on your artistic aims. I'll ...


6

I have had this happen twice on my D800. To release the lens is simple. There is a service port, or cut-out, that is visible in front of the lens release. A thin bladed screw driver inserted into this port, with the lens or body turning at the same time will separate the two. If nothing else, you now only have to send the body into Nikon. I feel the pin in ...


6

These are different designs, developed at different times. Forty years have gone between each was initially launched as the A-mount was simply acquired from Minolta which had by then fused into Konica-Minolta. The A-mount introduces AF which worked by Phase-Detection and hence lenses for that mount are designed to focus that way. Over the years, they were ...


6

A good web store like B&H has a list that seems to satisfy that criteria. http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/buy/Lens-Adapters/ci/3420/N/4077634486 There you can use filters like Brand (manufacturer) Camera fitting side (male side of adapter, camera mount) Lens fitting side (female, lens mount)


6

No, there is currently no battery powered lens cap sized aperture control devices for EF lenses. There are some cheap "dumb" (mechanical only) adapters that feature their own built in iris. But it's not a great idea to have the aperture stop that far back, as you will get some aperture variation across the frame. The are also some fully electronic ...


6

It's not just the weight of the camera that's a concern, but the torque that it will apply to the mounting ring on the lens (and in the camera, of course). Torque is turning force, and it's calculated by multiplying force (weight, in this case) by distance from the center of rotation. So, if we guess that your camera is 4" deep from the mount to the back of ...


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