38

You're probably better off with native-mount lenses For the most part, no, you can't mix'n'match lenses from different brands of cameras, because they'll usually use different mount systems. The mount system specifies how the lens and camera body physically link, and may also specify electronic communication between the lens and camera. If the lens and ...


22

There are two hard limits on how fast a lens can be: The first is a thermodynamic limit. If you could make a lens arbitrarily fast, then you could point it to the sun and use it to heat your sensor (not a good idea). If you then get your sensor hotter than the surface of the Sun, you are violating the second law of thermodynamics. This sets a hard limit at ...


22

Your lens is a Yashica ML 50mm f/1.9. The one pictured below is a more recent version of the same lens. The mount is the CONTAX/Yashica mount. Yashica revived the Contax name over a decade after production of any Contax rangefinder cameras and lenses in Germany had ended. Yashica chose to officially market the line as 'CONTAX' (always in all capital letters)...


21

Metal mounts are generally able to withstand wear and tear better than their plastic counterpart could. This is especially so for higher end lens that are heavier because of increased amount of glass elements and/or heavier, sturdier components that are used in the construction of the lens. For example, a Nikkor 70-200mm f/2.8 weighs around 1.4kg. If ...


21

There have been stories for years of mail order (and now online) retailers that pull a scam that goes something like this: You respond to an ad for an insanely low price on a lens. They accept your order and bill your credit card. A few days later they contact you to say the exact lens is out of stock, but they will sell you the upgraded version for only $$ ...


16

if I use the auto-focus, does it adjust the lens focus, or is there a secondary lens in the body that gets adjusted? No, there's no secondary lens. The lens attached to the camera contains a motor that moves the lens elements as required by the autofocus system. Same with the aperture settings, is this changing on the attached lens, or is there another ...


16

First: Sony doesn't necessarily disagree with Nikon's claim. It's just that Sony designed their 'E' mount with a throat diameter of 46.1 millimeters at a time when it appeared it would be an APS-C only mount for the NEX series of compact mirrorless ILCs. Sony later made the decision to move into full frame territory using the all-electronic 'E' mount, ...


14

The most important thing you'll need to know is the "lens mount" that both your lenses and your body use - examples here are Canon EF, Nikon F and Micro Four Thirds. Once you've done that, you'll need to find the flange focal distance (FFD) for both the lens and the body - handwaving slightly, the flange focal distance is how far the lens needs to be from ...


14

The first thing you need to ask yourself is, "Am I sure the only damage to the lens is to the mounting flange?" The second thing you need to ask yourself is, "Considering the cost of a new EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 is only around $200 and a used one can be found for half that, why would I consider sending the lens in for a repair that will likely cost near that ...


13

Any EF fit lenses you own (usually marked with a red dot near the EOS mount) will work fine with the 5D mkII Any EF-S fit lenses you own (usually marked with a white square near the EOS mount) won't work or fit the 5d mkII, as these are designed to fit crop sensor cameras like the T2i and not full frame sensors like the 5D mkII As an addition, some non-...


13

The difference is in the flange focal distance, i.e. the distance between the mounting flange for the lens and the film/sensor. Canon's EF-M has an 18mm flange focal distance, compared to 44mm for the EF and EF-S systems. That is, the lens is effectively 26mm closer to the sensor on the EF-M cameras, thanks to not having a reflex mirror, so not needing to ...


10

I have an Olympus body (E-PL1) and a Panasonic lens (100-300mm zoom), and haven't noticed any special problems. It feels kind of silly to have 'paid' for in-lens stabilization that I keep turned off, but even when I've accidentally knocked the switch into the on position, it doesn't ruin the average shot (it makes for odd effects during long exposures on a ...


10

I think the much more practical and affordable solution here is the traditional one: hire an assistant. As a bonus, that also replaces a lighting-setup robot, a hold-this-reflector robot, and a hey-couldja-get-me-a-coffee robot.


10

It is very unlikely that Canon will dump the EF-S mount any time soon. As you note it was derived from the EF mount, which is significantly older but still going strong. In fact, Canon's introduction of the EF-M derivative last year, if anything, indicated Canon is nowhere near phasing out the system. Camera mounts are not replaced nearly as often as other ...


10

I'm sure each manufacturer has a specification for the amount of force along several axes that their lens mounts need to be able to accommodate, but they don't seem to publish that data. They are probably not published because in the real world it is a specification that is not practically needed. It is fairly simple to understand why. Which to support (...


10

Check if you can somehow get this replaced/repaired for free by some expert due to warranty, insurance, etc. That would be the best solution. Find out the price that an expert repair costs or at least get an estimate and compare it to what a used lens costs. To know what the prices are for a non DIY solution. Take a flat srew driver or any other stiff/rigid ...


10

Using your thumb and forefinger on each hand, make a finger frame, and hold it out at arms length. Now imagine that your entire field of view is limited by the bounds of this finger frame. Anything outside of the frame is not visible to you. If you wanted to see a larger (wider) field of view, you have two options: Move the finger frame closer to your eye....


9

Having the lens sit much closer to the sensor removes the need to have a retrofocal (reverse telephoto) group which results in less extreme image correction, fewer lens elements and often a sharper image. However the increased angle of incidence of light rays at the edge of the image often results in increased light falloff (vignetting). For this reason a ...


9

The potential problem is that the sensor or the glass cover over the sensor is electrically charged whilst it is switched on, so if you take the lens off, it will attract dust. Search the web for sensor cleaning, but it is a subject that divides photographers. Some only ever get their sensors professionally cleaned, others do it themselves quite often. ...


9

The Sigma 70-300 mm F4-5.6 DG APO Macro is a lens that is available for both Sigma cameras and as a third party lens for many other brands, among them Nikon. These different manufacturers uses different lens mounts and this particular lens is available for Canon EF, Nikon F (FX), Pentax KAF, Sigma SA Bayonet and Sony/Minolta Alpha mounts. These mounts are ...


9

I think you've got a Minolta A-mount lens. Compare to this photo (image borrowed from here): Minolta and Konica merged at some point and were subsequently acquired by Sony, and this mount is apparently still used by Sony as the "Alpha mount system".


9

Will the sigma 17-55mm 2.8 lense fit my full frame canon 6d ? The lens that I think you're talking about is the Sigma 17-50mm f/2.8 EX DC (OS) HSM. Although any lens with an EF mount will fit your 6D, the "DC" designation means that the lens is designed for APS-C sensors rather than full frame, so the image won't cover the entire sensor. If you're looking ...


9

This is a "process" lens used to make copies on high contrast film for reproduction in newspapers, magazines, and books. The lens mounted on a square wood board with hole for the lens. The lens mounted with wood screws. On some, the board was metal, usually aluminum. If an aluminum mount was used it was also called a lens board. The lens mounted to metal ...


8

EF-S are not just optimized for APS-C cameras, they are made for those only. In other words, they will NOT work on full-frame models or even APS-H ones. The imaging circle the project is smaller which lets them be made lighter and more compact than equivalent full-frame lenses. The FLM (Focal-Length Multiplier) still applies when comparing the angle-of-view ...


8

If you are talking for AI-P lenses, then there is absolutely no risk (see the other's answers giving the compatibility link). But it looks you are talking more of a pre-AI lens (original F lenses) where the P was meaning "Penta" for 5 elements. In that case there are two answers: The lens is original: it can cause a problem with cameras who have the ...


8

You don't tend to get telescopes designed for a particular camera, what you need to look for is a telescope camera mount for your 60D. This is a device which replaces the eye piece on the telescope with an EF mount which the camera is connected to instead of a normal lens. The adapter usually consists of two parts. A 'T' adapter which fits directly onto the ...


8

Canon also announced the Canon Mount Adapter EF-EOS M when they announced the EOS M camera. The adapter is said to be available in October 2012 for $199 USD. It is compatible with the full range of EF and EF-S lenses that are currently available. This also includes the full range of third-party lenses that currently work with the available EOS bodies. The ...


8

I think this may be what you are after, this one even does video :-)


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