17

It is a 70mm Graflex KE-4 “Combat Graphic” made from 1953-1957. Graflex KE-4 Combat Graphic


17

That depends on the type of camera. I used to have a Fuji auto-loading camera, that would spool the entire film out of the canister first and then every taken photo back into the relative safety of the canister. I'm sure there are other brands that do the same. While this is a nice feature, it does not work to your advantage in this particular case. I would ...


15

The orange veil to the right of the last image is a common effect of light fogging. In fact, I've seen that many times on the first frame of 35mm when I started exposing without winding enough frames first. The white fog might be a different sort of light leak, perhaps due to the shutter not being completely closed when you advance film and cock the camera....


12

This is common beginner mistake. You are fortunate that you did it in the first few shots of the roll. Only the film that is outside of the canister will have been exposed to daylight ( ruined ) when you opened the camera. So any film inside the canister will be fine. You use the little black nub on the end of the canister to roll the film back into the ...


10

No. After you advance the film, you can't re-expose a previous frame on a Nikon FM2. the inaccuracy of the film advance mechanism plus the uncertainty of the position of initial starting point makes this a nearly impossible, as Alan Marcus points out. If you don't advance the film on a FM2 after an accidental exposure with the lens cap on, you can use the ...


10

Sorry to report that the inaccuracy of the film advance mechanism plus the uncertainty of the position of initial starting point makes this a nearly impossible task. If you rewound the film back into the cassette and attempted to reposition the unexposed frame for a retake, most likely an adjacent frame would be double exposed. Best advice is to let this ...


10

As you know, a short tapered tongue / leader -- length of film protrudes from the velvet lined mouth of the film cassette. The velvet is a light trap that protects the film in the interior of the cassette from being fogged during the film loading procedure. You would be wise to load and unload in subdued light. In desperation, use your body’s shadow. We ...


8

What you describe is a misaligment of the beam splitter (which, despite its name, in this case combines or overlays the image from the moving mirror or prism in the RF over the straight-through image in the main viewfinder). Correcting this is possible in almost all rangefinders, and fairly routine for an experienced technician. Be sure you mention it when ...


7

Either / or It's an entirely mechanical device with a manual wind. It will show the same number whether or not you took that frame yet. The mechanism should prevent you double-exposing (though some cameras have an intentional double exposure setting) but you'll only find that out normally when you try to press the shutter release. That indicator on a film ...


5

Double 8 movie film --- The first successful motion picture system was an invention of Thomas Edison. His system used 35mm wide long rolls of film. To transport the film through the camera smoothly, the film was punched on the left and right edges with holes (sprocket holes) that engaged with gears in the film transport mechanism. Movies and 35mm wide film ...


5

There's something in your camera's light box fairly close in front of the film plane. Just because it is intermittent doesn't mean it isn't there. In fact, intermittent obstructions indicate that it is almost certainly something to do with the parts that move every time you shoot a frame: the shutter assembly and the mirror assembly. I certainly don't ...


5

When you set the ISO on camera, that is the adjustment to compensate for increased development time. Any further changes to shutter speed or aperture would change the exposure further. In the scenario you describe, you want to process ISO 400 film at ISO 1600. That is a two-stop increase in development. So exposure has to decrease by two stops. Based on the ...


4

Seems like your shutter curtain is damaged or needs a CLA (Clean-Lubricate-Adjust) At faster shutter speeds part of the image gets blocked by the shutter curtain. The slower shutter speeds seem fine, which is illustrated by your indoor shots not having any dark areas. Getting shutters repaired is an expensive task and oftentimes it is a better option to ...


4

I think it's more likely these photos were taken with a film that was rated at a higher speed, shot at that speed, and "pushed" in the processing to compensate for the "underexposure." Film then was relatively slow. One of the very fastest film was rated at "ASA" 1200 (Royal Pan X, for example) and processed in a high-energy developer or in rare ...


4

I don't think anyone has answered the actual question: in all mechanical cameras I've seen, and most electronic ones, the counter counts up, from 1 (or 0, on some cameras) at the beginning of the roll, and always shows the currently available frame after advancing, or the most recently exposed before. These frames are determined by the way the camera's ...


3

This is called focus and recompose. Note the position of the focus point in the bottom left picture - it is between the two people. If you tried to focus there, the camera would focus on the background, throwing the subjects out of focus. So you focus on one subject, then recompose so both subjects are now in the frame. You only have to do this in similar ...


3

The really muted cinema stuff—like Saving Private Ryan—isn't about the film, it's about the processing. Specifically, bleach bypass. In color film developed normally, activating the color couplers is a side-effect of developing three b&w silver images. These silver images are then bleached away, leaving just the color. In bleach bypass that step is ...


3

Old Leica screw-mount cameras were designed to be used with longer leaders. You have two options: Reshape the leader with scissors or other cutting implement. You may make or purchase a leader template if desired. See YouTube: How to load 35mm film in to a Screw Mount Leica. Load the film without reshaping the leader. Make sure the film is fully seated so ...


3

No, it doesn't require batteries, although there are drawbacks to using the camera without them. The battery powers the camera's light meter. This means you will not be able to shoot in auto without a battery. You could shoot manually, but this would mean metering must be done either by guestimating, using the sunny 16 rule, or by the use of an external ...


3

The light meter that's in your camera is an reflective meter. Reflective meters measure the light that is reflected off of the subject, and determine the exposure based on that reading. Standalone incident meters, like the Sekonic models, instead measure the light that falls onto your subject. There are multiple reasons for choosing one over the other: ...


3

The rewind button on manual cameras serves to release the take up spool so that you can use the rewind lever to get the film back into that can. Pushing the button alone doesn’t do anything. Releasing it puts things back how they were. Side note, on cameras that don’t have multiple exposure support out of the box, you can hold the button down while ...


3

How it normally works with a lens with an aperture control ring: the camera will meter with the lens wide-open, and when you press the shutter, the lens will stop down until it is physically stopped by the setting of the aperture control ring. The camera will know ahead of time what the aperture ring's setting is because there is a position lever on the ...


3

Before doing anything else, I'd recommend reading the manual to familiarize yourself with the operation of the camera. (Note that there's nothing automatic about this camera! You need to meter using an external meter or sunny 16, set the shutter and aperture manually, and wind manually after each shot.) The Canon III is a beautiful old camera with a simple ...


3

I would say "neither"... As you noted, you could advance a couple times to even get to "1" - those could have been real frames that are now wasted. In addition, you may buy what is marketed as a 36-frame roll, but you can often get a couple extras out of it before you can't advance any farther. Both the frame counter and the nominal frame ...


3

The Canon EF film camera did have a dedicated flash called the Speedlite 133D but it was very low powered and difficult to use. It was called "The CAT System" (Canon Auto Tuning) and needed a ring installed on the front of the lens in order to transmit focus distance information to the flash. Instead, I would recommend any film era Thyristor flash ...


3

I've got some experience with "found film" -- it's a lot of fun. First, don't expect much; film that stood in the camera, potentially for decades, is likely to be heavily fogged and show mottling and/or wrapper offset (where the ink on the backing has fogged the emulsion in contact with it on the supply and takeup spools). Second, you'll likely ...


2

From the Wikipedia FM2 article: The FM2 accepts all Nikon F bayonet mount lenses that support the Automatic Indexing (AI) feature introduced in 1977. The Nikon-made AI lenses of this type are the AF-S Nikkor, AF-I Nikkor, AF Nikkor D, AF Nikkor, Nikkor AI-S, Nikkor AI and Nikon Series E types. Nikon’s most recent 35 mm film SLR lenses, the AF Nikkor G ...


2

This is an image of a series i took way back in ancient times with an instamatic film camera. There was a loose covering inside, which i only noticed after half a month of traveling portugal. The piece shows up differently on each photo and not at all on some of them. But finding and fixing this was pretty easy once i noticed, as it was fairly obvious when ...


2

The flange distances don't appear to be the hanging point. The OM registration distance is only 0.5mm shorter than the Nikon F mount. There are Nikon F to Canon FD adapters. It seems to be more of an issue with the opposite direction of rotation for the two respective lens mounts combined with specific clearance issues due to the FD breech lock style mount ...


2

Use higher iso film, for example 50 or 100 iso. Use higher camera f-stop, eg f8. Use UV or Polarising filter.


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