40

Your question is flawed, and you are making connections where there aren't any. Some people are short-sighted, some are long-sighted, and others are neither. This relates to the eye muscles not being able to draw light rays into focus at the retina. One wears glasses to correct for this, but the eye muscles are still used to bring objects into focus. So, you ...


27

It's probably a combination of two factors, firstly as you rightly suggest the focus screen plays a role - the view you see in the viewfinder effectively passes through a second aperture and so appears to be stopped down to about f/2.4 - f/2.8 So you can see bokeh through the viewfinder, it will just be much less pronounced due to the smaller effective ...


19

There is more shutter lag because the shutter has to close first before opening again to expose the shot. When you turn on live view, the mirror is raised and the shutter is opened, so the image formed by the sensor can be fed constantly to the LCD. When you take a shot in live view, the shutter closes again to 'reset' the sensor before the actual exposure ...


18

It's important to realize that you don't actually look directly through the lens with an SLR! If you did, a periscope style arrangement would do just fine. What you are actually doing is looking at an image projected onto the focussing screen by the lens. This image is flipped left/right and up/down by the lens, and then up/down again by the main mirror. ...


17

There are both advantages and disadvantages to EVFs. The very best ones with high-resolution and high-refresh rates are actually quite suitable for most uses when well-implemented. The main disadvantages are: Lag: There is a short lag between action happening in front of the camera and what you see. Dynamic-Range: EVFs are small LCD screens and have ...


16

You certainly knocked the diopter adjustement out of place. It is there to compensate for people who need eye-glasses. With your eye looking through the viewfinder, adjust the knob on the upper right side until you see what is in focus clearly sharp.


15

I suspect the major reason this is true for DSLRs is to get the lightning-fast focus times that point-and-shoot cameras don't have. The autofocus mechanism is not actually part of the main CCD/CMOS sensor, but a separate device in the camera body, and the mirror splits the light coming through your lens so that half goes to the viewfinder and half goes to ...


14

You will not see a change of brightness through the viewfinder as the aperture is only stopped down when the photo is taken. This allows the auto focus sensors to focus accurately as many cannot focus below certain apertures. It also provides more light for you to compose your shot with. Many DSLRs have a "Depth-of-Field preview" button that stops the ...


13

Yes they do but so does your hand placed over the viewfinder. To take this shot last week I had the sun behind me. Without covering the viewfinder I got a strong veil and very low contrast image. Unfortunately, my viewfinder cover was attached to strap I forgot to bring. Luckily my hands were free during the exposure, so I retook the shot and got a crisp ...


13

Pros of using an EVF as opposed to the rear LCD screen: It is easier to see in direct sunlight. Holding the camera to the eye increases stability and comfort (especially with heavier lenses). EVFs offers diopter correction so users don't need to wear eyeglasses.


13

As 40-something human, I totally understand your question. As you get to about this age, your eye looses flexibility, and it becomes impossible to change the focus distance of your eye like young people can. This is why there are bifocals — by looking through different parts of such glasses, you at least get two options. "Progressive" lenses are basically ...


13

Solved. I accidentally placed the focusing screen by flipping it on other side which made in focus objects blurry. I corrected it and it's back to normal now.


12

To answer some of your questions directly, since you asked a few of them. First off, the mechanics of previewing a scene with the view finder vs. with live view are different. When viewing the scene through the view finder, you are seeing a direct optical projection of the scene as the lens attached to the camera sees it. Light is bent via a mirror from the ...


12

The percentage dictates how much of the capture scene is visible to you before the capture. A true WYSIWYG situation is a 100% viewfinder because what you see with your eye will be what your final image gets. Anything less than 100% means that there are elements that will be captured in the scene that you cannot see at the time you look through the ...


11

You can move your head around, and the frame will line up differently depending on your exact point of view. And wearing glasses, the frame will seem even smaller than without - because your eye is further away. Cropping is far easier than synthesizing something you thought would end up in frame, but actually didn't. The viewfinder on a rangefinder camera ...


11

It's the number of shots remaining (hence the "r") that you can take and store on your card. When you half-press the shutter button, the number changes to the number of shots remaining in your memory buffer (pictures stored in memory that haven't been written to the storage card yet). This lets you know how many more shots you can take in "CH" (continuous ...


10

In my experience, transitioning from 95% to 100% made a significant difference in my photography. The 5% can hide a decent amount. Shooting a lot of wide-angle means that there can be a lot in the missing 5%. It's easy with my 10-22mm on my 7D to capture the foot of my tripod in that extra 5% and I'd rather not crop the image. You can't easily judge what ...


10

Inside the viewfinder is a convex lens which enables your eye to focus on the screen. This works in exactly the same way as convex lens used in a pair of glasses to correct long sightedness. The power of this lens is usually adjustable via a small dial next to the eyepiece to account for differences in people's eyesight. Some people who wear glasses have ...


10

Well, the viewfinder itself is not going to cause infections, but some of the germs that cause conjunctivitis are highly contagious. If you're passing your camera to people with red eye, ask them to wash their hands and to use the LCD screen instead. In general, though, these germs are not particularly long-lived away from a human host. Just letting the ...


10

There are two main possibilities I can think of. The easiest is that you may have inadvertently adjusted the diopter setting on your view finder. This would make the entire thing look slightly blurry. If this is the problem, fixing it should be as simple as adjusting the diopter dial near the viewfinder itself. The other potential problem is that the ...


10

Pushing the camera towards your head will significantly stabilize the framing; I, for one, need a faster shutter speed when shooting without looking through the VF. Also, it is less strenuous to use the camera close to the body. I also like that the distance between my eye and the EVF does not change (that much) compared to the rear LCD, so I can be fairly ...


9

Articulated displays are just another moving part that is not typically necessary on pro grade equipment. Adding a screen like that will likely increase the size of the camera, and also make the screen more vulnerable to damage and wear. Some pro series cameras also now have options for external LCD screens that can be attached to the body. Many ...


9

It is "easy enough" to explain the basic question with a ray diagram or similar means - see below BUT it is important to realize that the answer to why viewfinder or human eye images are not inverted is "by design" or "because" (choose one, both the same essentially). That is to say, the system requires the outcome to be a certain way, so whatever steps ...


9

That's how it's meant to look. Refer the manual from Canon's website, page 23: Refer also p36: the top LCD should be the same.


8

What you're missing is the edges of what will show up in the picture. Exactly how much on which sides is open to question -- typically what you see won't be perfectly centered in the picture.


8

Well, first I should mention that dust on the focusing screen has no effect on the image quality or the exposure metering, so for that sake there is no need to clean it. On the other hand the dust may get loose and get onto the sensor, so it's a good preventive measure tog get the worst dust away at least. To clean it, you should first turn the camera off, ...


8

Could someone please tell me what it does, or at least what it's called, so I can look it up? Scottbb's answer is correct and you should accept it, but I wanted to follow up with a little more information about how to find the answer in case you have others like it. There's a diagram on page 6 of the Nikon D5500 user manual (PDF) that describes the ...


8

Electronic viewfinder Pros: Potentially smaller and lighter camera bodies and lenses (particularly wide angle lenses) Can zoom in to verify precise focus and depth of field Can see (almost) exactly what the camera sees, even in low light Can superimpose more complex data over the image (e.g. zebra stripes, focus peaking); see note below. No mirror assembly ...


7

As Mike Johnston explains the viewfinders, the focusing screens used in modern cameras tend to be made super-bright in order to accommodate the slow zoom lenses that often get connected, but this brighter construction (like an array of miniature lenses, or a bunch of very short fiber-optic cables) also makes much of the image to appear in focus, much more so ...


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