46

On SLR cameras, the optical path is connected to the viewfinder. Even while a picture is being taken and the mirror is up, blocking the viewfinder path, it's possible the seal/gasket between the mirror and focusing screen will let some light through. It's a very small amount of light, and usually not noticeable. However, when taking long-exposure or bulb-...


39

Your question is flawed, and you are making connections where there aren't any. Some people are short-sighted, some are long-sighted, and others are neither. This relates to the eye muscles not being able to draw light rays into focus at the retina. One wears glasses to correct for this, but the eye muscles are still used to bring objects into focus. So, you ...


38

(Normally I would not post an answer to a question I've already voted as a duplicate. But the danger of irreversible damage to a user's eyes compels me to write this.) We've all seen or heard this Henny Youngman joke: Translated to your situation, it goes something like this: Patient: "I looked at the sun through my camera's viewfinder and saw a black ...


27

Your camera, like many modern DSLRs, has a “transmissive” optical viewfinder which requires battery power in order to be fully transparent. Here is what Canon says about Transmissive Viewfinders in Digital camera features: Transmissive LCD viewfinders: This new viewfinder uses a transmissive LCD which, unlike traditional viewfinders, does not feature ...


20

There is more shutter lag because the shutter has to close first before opening again to expose the shot. When you turn on live view, the mirror is raised and the shutter is opened, so the image formed by the sensor can be fed constantly to the LCD. When you take a shot in live view, the shutter closes again to 'reset' the sensor before the actual exposure ...


18

It's important to realize that you don't actually look directly through the lens with an SLR! If you did, a periscope style arrangement would do just fine. What you are actually doing is looking at an image projected onto the focussing screen by the lens. This image is flipped left/right and up/down by the lens, and then up/down again by the main mirror. ...


13

Pros of using an EVF as opposed to the rear LCD screen: It is easier to see in direct sunlight. Holding the camera to the eye increases stability and comfort (especially with heavier lenses). EVFs offers diopter correction so users don't need to wear eyeglasses.


13

As 40-something human, I totally understand your question. As you get to about this age, your eye looses flexibility, and it becomes impossible to change the focus distance of your eye like young people can. This is why there are bifocals — by looking through different parts of such glasses, you at least get two options. "Progressive" lenses are basically ...


13

Solved. I accidentally placed the focusing screen by flipping it on other side which made in focus objects blurry. I corrected it and it's back to normal now.


11

It's the number of shots remaining (hence the "r") that you can take and store on your card. When you half-press the shutter button, the number changes to the number of shots remaining in your memory buffer (pictures stored in memory that haven't been written to the storage card yet). This lets you know how many more shots you can take in "CH" (continuous ...


11

This isn't possible with DSLRs using optical viewfinders. This image (source) shows the cross-section of a DSLR: Normally light enters the lens, reflects off the mirror (#2) into the pentaprism (#8) and then to the optical viewfinder (#9). When the mirror is in this position, light does not reach the sensor. When recording a video, the sensor makes 60 ...


10

It sounds like you're observing the laser etched glass focussing screen. A focusing screen requires a rough surface so an image can be formed for you to view through the viewfinder. Ground glass used to be used for this purpose but now glass etched in a circular pattern with a laser is used, to improve the brightness of the viewfinder when used with slower ...


10

There are two main possibilities I can think of. The easiest is that you may have inadvertently adjusted the diopter setting on your view finder. This would make the entire thing look slightly blurry. If this is the problem, fixing it should be as simple as adjusting the diopter dial near the viewfinder itself. The other potential problem is that the ...


10

That's how it's meant to look. Refer the manual from Canon's website, page 23: Refer also p36: the top LCD should be the same.


10

Pushing the camera towards your head will significantly stabilize the framing; I, for one, need a faster shutter speed when shooting without looking through the VF. Also, it is less strenuous to use the camera close to the body. I also like that the distance between my eye and the EVF does not change (that much) compared to the rear LCD, so I can be fairly ...


8

There are several menu settings that affect when the red illumination of focus points is activated. By default, the red indicator lights will only illuminate over the active focus points when focus is achieved and the brightness of the scene in the viewfinder is low. You can modify this in the menu settings. Under the AF 5 (purple) tab, select VF display ...


8

It seems like you have mirror lockup enabled. The first full press of the shutter button will cause the mirror to move up (just as it does before taking a normal photo using the viewfinder) but the shutter will not be opened. A second full press of the shutter button will activate the shutter to take the photo. If the shutter is not pressed again for 30 ...


8

Could someone please tell me what it does, or at least what it's called, so I can look it up? Scottbb's answer is correct and you should accept it, but I wanted to follow up with a little more information about how to find the answer in case you have others like it. There's a diagram on page 6 of the Nikon D5500 user manual (PDF) that describes the ...


8

Electronic viewfinder Pros: Potentially smaller and lighter camera bodies and lenses (particularly wide angle lenses) Can zoom in to verify precise focus and depth of field Can see (almost) exactly what the camera sees, even in low light Can superimpose more complex data over the image (e.g. zebra stripes, focus peaking); see note below. No mirror assembly ...


7

Yes completely normal and nothing to worry about. As you are aware all SLR / DSLR cameras have a prism / mirror / eyepiece, which can collect dust just as easily as any other part of your camera. I can only assume that you do not keep your D7100 in a particularly sanitary conditions - as my D70, D300 and D800 have never suffered with viewfinder dust to a ...


7

The key to understanding the relationship between magnification ratio and coverage percentage is to realize that the other variable is the size of the viewfinder. If one APS-C camera (such as the Canon 30D) gives a 95% view at 0.90x and another APS-C camera (such as the Canon 40D) gives a 95% view at 0.95x, it is because the viewfinder in the 40D is slightly ...


7

This is the electronic level indicator. It indicates that you're not holding the camera parallel to the ground but instead have tilted it. The specific configuration indicates that you've got a tilt of greater than 2°. From page 66 of the manual: Note that this is configurable — you can turn it off if you don't like it. It's also available on the rear LCD ...


7

Please don't go into taking off glasses and using the viewfinder focus. This question is about USING GLASSES WITH THE VIEWFINDER. I am not interested in essays on using viewfinder diopters, that is not what this question is about. Your question is based upon a false assumption: that eyeglass prescriptions are measured in focal length rather than in diopters....


7

DSLRs have a direct, optical path through the lens. (Well, a reflected direct path.) You are seeing the scene with your eyes. Mirrorless cameras with a viewfinder actually use a small LCD screen — we call this an electronic viewfinder, or "EVF". You are seeing the image read from the sensor processed for viewing, not the scene itself. Both approaches have ...


6

If you are using the viewfinder rather than the LCD, I'm not sure what you could possibly do. A DSLR uses a mirror to redirect light from the lens to the viewfinder and away from the sensor. I guess it might be possible to use a very small macro camera that could be mounted to the viewfinder itself, but I'd think the quality would be marginal compared to ...


6

That's a 'focusing screen'. You can easily obtain it either from the manufacturer directly, or from a camera store. For example from Adorama Typically, for one model of camera there will be a few types of focusing screens that work with it. Your camera's manual will tell you which one has been installed by default, and which ones you can substitute for ...


6

Yes, it's normal behavior. The reason you're having problems is that the 5DMkIII has an LCD overlay in the viewfinder. This overlay is used to give you grid lines you can turn on and off and different AF point displays. Without power, the LCD becomes opaque. This behavior is identical in Nikon cameras with an LCD overlay in the viewfinder, and has long ...


6

I was just wondering is it meant to be there or is it manufacturing error? It's definitely intentional -- it's the same in the viewfinder and on the top LCD on my Canon 6D. However, the icon on the Battery Info page on the main screen lacks the open spot. My educated guess is that the hole in the battery icon provides access for the conductors that control ...


6

Your understanding is not correct. The image is indeed projected on a focusing screen, but what you see on the focusing screen is already more or less the final image. You do not necessarily need any optical magic between the focusing screen and your eye. You could just as well look directly onto it and use the image you see to adjust focus and do the ...


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