27

Search for "photo-etching on metal" and you will find many sources. These are not super expensive. Have more than one made so you or your heirs can replace down the road.


15

Scan them. Now. Even relatively low end cheap scanners can capture more than the visible detail of a picture. Once you have a good digital representation, make a few backups on as long-lasting media as you can find, and put them in separate places. Give a copy to several relatives dispersed around the globe. I know this doesn't preserve the original ...


13

Others have given advice on digitising which is very worthwhile and I would suggest this should be done as soon as possible. However, assuming that there is value placed on the photograph itself as a historic object not just the image it contains as a historic record then you will want to do your best to also preserve them as well as you are able. The ...


11

There is a technique for somehow etching a picture onto polished stone (granite?). I saw this on a few gravestones in the Rye Colorado cemetery in August of 2016. The polished stone was dark. The etched areas reflected ambient light more, and made a recognizable image when viewed from the right angles. I have no idea how long something like this lasts, ...


9

Stan Rogers and floqui covered problems of framing without glass - but I want to offer another alternative - frame without glass anyway, let me explain. If those prints are one-of-a-kind or in any way can't be reproduced (or can't be reproduced without a lot of darkroom work) than this is irrelevant but if those can just be re-printed than you can trade ...


9

Water does not harm photographic paper. After all, it is soaked in different waterbased chemicals during developing and washed in clean water in the end. So you'll be quite safe removing the glass along with the photo from the frame and sinking them in good clean lukewarm water with a couple of drops of liquid soap. Do not try to pry the photo off the glass ...


9

This seems to be popular in some cultures. The photos I have seen appear to be fired in a ceramic kiln. A quick web search finds suppliers who will inkjet print the ceramic and fire it into a porcelain photo. Anything that survives a ceramic kiln will not fade quickly in the sun- the colors that typically fade such as the reds will be inorganic oxides ...


7

Unless you're using album sleeves manufactured to being archival, they could be part of the problem, outgassing chemicals that deteriorate the images. Also, unless the images were printed on archival-quality paper, the photos could be damaging themselves because many papers and processing techniques can leave the final result acidic, which can break them ...


7

The usual coating of photographic paper consists of (hardened) gelatin, together with a lot of other chemicals. Unless it has some extra protectional coating as described on this wikipedia image the gelatin is directly exposed to the environment, and if you ever have used gelatin for baking or cooking, it gets a bit sticky when wet, and dissolves ...


6

Glass framing will protect your print from various effect First of all UV (which are present in the sunlight but also in smaller amount in most of the modern lightning). with time UV alter the print color but they are also aging the paper itself Stain from the environment (You know this black spot from the fly or the little drop of saliva when your old anut ...


5

If you are looking for a color photo, carbon printing is about as permanent as it gets, and the image can be deposited on more or less any substrate. The black and white version of the process uses literal carbon (lampblack); three colour separations are made with artists pigments, like for oil paintings, which are known to last hundreds of years without ...


4

I had some stacks of prints that glued themselves into a brick. I found that putting them in the freezer helped all but the very worst of them work free without any apparent damage. I'm not sure if the same will hold true for photos on album pages, but I'd expect you're experiencing the same sort of gluing problem I did.


4

I have tried this myself. Difference to long-term storage of unexposed film is obvious. Controlled purposeful freezing is far from what happens in a garage or open attic during a year of ever-changing weather. Weather is a problem, not the cold temperature alone. In a normal Canadian winter and spring the temperatures go repeatedly below freezing point and ...


4

At least at the gross visual level there isn't a noticeable difference. Put it under a magnifying glass and you can tell by analyzing the actual printing technique though. If you see exposed pigments it's a photographic paper, if you see droplets, it's ink jet, if you see fused toner, it's a laser (though I'm not aware of any laser photo printers). ...


4

Yes, the LR/Mogrify 2 plugin does exactly what you want. Once you've followed the installation instructions, do the following: Bring up the Export dialog. In the Post-Process Actions window, double-click Text Annotations (under LR/Mogrify 2) In Define your text, enter {title}. (You can also get there by clicking Add Token, then picking Title of photo in the ...


4

Normally pictures used in cemeteries are porcelain pictures and they won't fade because the ceramic toners are fired onto the porcelain at high temperatures. They are sold in many shapes and sizes. You can do a 5x7 rectangle with a frame or a 5x7 oval with a frame from www.photosforheadstones.com. They do the pictures for much cheaper than what the ...


3

Clothing, hair, makeup, facial hair, furniture, cars, landmarks, etc... those can all be used to make an educated guess. Although we can't see all of that in this image. Beyond clues in the image content itself, nailing a specific creation date of a scanned image will be difficult. Someone might have an idea of the film used if it was shot on film, but ...


3

Since I do photo restorations I frequently see the results of others efforts of trying to separate the photo from the glass.I personally do not try separating them. I do a high resolution flat bed scan through the glass and then rebuild the photo on my computer. This way my customer has both.


3

I love unglassed prints. It is all I would buy. I have asked photographers to reprint and not charge me for the glass, the clunky frame, etc. Some did, some refused. I love staring into the depth of a completely matte image printed on rag with no resin coating placed in a dark thin wooden frame. Sure, some pieces in my collection have a little ...


3

The answer will be highly dependent on the specifics of the situation, such as how much heat and humidity, and over what period of time. It's unlikely that anyone will be able to provide an accurate answer for your situation because you very likely haven't recorded the temperature and humidity levels over the storage period, but "incredibly hot" can't be ...


3

UV blocking window films are available at auto window tinting shops. That being said, harmful UV rays are stopped by ordinary glass. That being said, silver based black and white prints are unlikely to be harmed by UV rays as the image is composed of metallic silver.


2

If it has already started to crack/peel, there is probably nothing that you can do to save it im afraid. Some shops will spray a lacquer/sealant onto canvas prints - in the short term they look better as they make the colours "pop", however as the canvas stretches with time, the lacquer cant so it cracks. (this also depends on the quality of the original ...


2

In the 'old' days, a kind of wax polish was used to 'deepen' the blacks and also to protect a little the emulsion of photographic prints. As it doesn't contains water it would not dissolve the ink of modern inkjet prints and would perhaps work on those Kodak prints too. On those 'classic' baryta photographic prints, I use the "Vernis Céronis pour tableaux ...


2

There is some useful info on this from Kodak here: Storage and Care of KODAK Photographic Materials Quoting from this Kodak publication: "Glass mounts do not have any significant effect on the useful life of slides except to help protect them from dirt and scratches. (Before you mount slides in glass mounts, be sure that the glass surfaces are clean.) ...


2

This is possible without the use of a plugin as described on this Adobe blog post. But if you want to see the captions on the exported photo, here’s a trick: Export JPEGs of captioned slides. In the Slideshow module, create your slide show with captions as described above, and then press Alt (Windows) or Option (Mac OS) to change the Export PDF button to ...


2

Vacuum-sealed won't help much - it will just apply a lot of excess pressure on what is probably already brittle. You are probably thinking about inert gas filled, which will stop any oxidation reactions. Argon and nitrogen are the most common gases to use here. Old albums are not a good way to store anything. The paper and adhesives are rarely archival ...


2

When you add caption and title data to an image in Lightroom, it is preserved in IPTC metadata format, and therefore already embedded in the image. Most photo programs, and Windows and Mac OSX will display this info when viewing details of an image: i.e. Mac OSX 'Get Info'. For easier sharing, you can ask Lightroom to use the 'Caption as Filename' on ...


2

I can't find anything on long-term archival properties of Instax film, either, but this phoblographer article on current instant film and cameras mentions that the B&W Instax will turn sepia (but also states the prints don't fade), so I would assume that the B&W version isn't any more archival than the color. Polaroids are known to fade. Instant ...


1

Use fine brass bristle brush to remove the corrosion (careful it might do more harm than good) followed by pencil eraser. You might try the eraser first. start with artgum from an office supply store. If too soft, use pink pearl pencil eraser. These erasers will polish and remove some of the corrosion.


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