31

Polaroid applied for a design mark apparently covering the shape of their prints, but that application was abandoned in 2000. That shape is distinctive, but, for example, Fujifilm Instax looks similar — not to mention Impossible Project film, which is actually made in a former Polaroid factory. You're not using the Polaroid name, which does have a valid ...


15

That particular ring, by itself, is the aperture stop. The normal operating mode of the Land Camera (150, at least) was a coordinated exposure system that coupled particular shutter speeds and apertures using the EV system. From the Land Camera 150 user manual, The shutter dial adjusts the camera to the right combination of shutter speed and lens ...


13

It's Polaroid Land Camera 1000. It's obviously not classic SX-70 because it's not SLR, it has see-through viewfinder.


11

Do all brands of photographic film utilize gelatin in their composition? Most likely Yes; but they're not saying publically (and may or may not tell you if you asked them.) How about Polaroid? Polaroid no longer exist except as a brand. The factory's new owners The Impossible Project had a pretty hard time as they could not use the components left ...


8

The Mamiya 645 is incapable of producing images bigger than 645 format allows (nominally 6x4.5 cm, actually 56 × 41.5 mm). This is the size of the little opening in your Mamiya Polaroid back. A question remains: what use is then the Polaroid back, when it produces such tiny images (they are not much smaller than wildly successful Instax Mini, at 62 × 46 mm, ...


7

This FAQ on PETA's website suggests that there is no vegan friendly film, and they themselves use digital cameras to minimize their use of animal products (though they do make an exception from this policy in using photographs from others). Does film contain gelatin? Unfortunately, we do not know of any film that is made without gelatin. Over the ...


6

The strobes you are using have the following temps (sourced from B&H Product Specs): Profoto B1: 5600K Profoto D2: 5600K B&H says that the B1 color temp can vary +/- 150K over the entire power range in normal mode and +/- 800K in Freeze Mode. Given this, if you're not doing exceptionally high speed photography, I'd recommend that you use Normal ...


5

Knowing that Polaroid 600 is 3.1 inch by 3.1 inch, I deduce that film is 3.6 x 2.9 inch. According to Wikipedia, Spectra / Image / 1200 cameras integral film is exactly that size.


5

The Instax is a camera which uses light-sensitive film to capture photos. The film packs include a cover that prevents light from reaching the film inside while it is being transferred from the package to the camera. Once the pack has been installed and the camera has ejected the cover, the individual sheets of film are exposed, allowing light to reach the ...


5

Photo films, unlike digital sensors, do not self-adjust when encountering different lighting situations. Photo films are made to be exposed under specific lighting situations. In the heyday of color film usage, films were harmonized for use in daylight or under studio tungsten or home movie tungsten or flash bulb. There were other specialized emulsions ...


5

What should I have to give me an image that is larger while still using this Mamiya 645? You can't do it with your Mamiya 645. The 645 name comes from the untrimmed size of the film format: 6 x 4.5 centimeters (60 x 45 mm or 2.36 x 1.77 inches). The actual imaging area is 56 x 41.5 mm. That's the size of the area of your larger Polaroid film that was ...


5

Were these posts false Yes. Yes they are. The iconic darkroom safelight is usually red or reddish in color. The reason for this is that the black and white photo paper that one is using to print their negative is sensitive to only blue and green wavelengths of light. This means that you can hold one of those unexposed pieces of paper right in front of a ...


4

If you're talking about a Polaroid camera that takes packs of self-developing film, the battery is part of the pack itself. If yours isn't working, the solution is to move the film itself into a working pack. For details, see: https://danfinnen.com/article/what-to-do-if-you-have-a-dead-battery-in-a-polaroid-film-cartridge/


4

The reagent that starts the development process is stored in the wide border at the bottom of the print and spread onto the exposed area by a pair of rollers in the camera as the print is pushed out. There are a couple of possibilities for what's happening in your case: One is that the rollers in your camera are dirty and aren't doing their job. You ...


4

If you're shooting in daylight I don't think you'd need a flash bar assuming the film pack is still good. The developer 'pods' may be dried out by now and I would also be concerned about the embedded battery in the film pack being dead. BTW, an SX-70 film pack will only work in an SX-70 camera. The older folders used a different film format and technology.


4

It would seem to be a standard Polaroid 600 in a colour that this dude on flickr refers to as Party Blue. Indeed searching for Polaroid 600 Party Blue on Google yields many results showing that camera. According to the Polaroid page on the Camerapedia wiki it belongs to the Polaroid 600 One Step Flash (Close Up) family and it is indeed known under the ...


4

The Polaroid film back puts the Polaroid onto the existing film plane, which has a projected image size designed for 120 film. There's no changing that (that I'm aware of)


3

Taking polaroids at wedding receptions is nice. There are some things that you should be aware of: There's no polaroid film available any more. You can get modern film from the impossible project, but it does not develop as quickly as the original polaroid film. Waiting a long time for a polaroid image kind of defeats the point of using that technology. ...


3

It looks like a Polaroid Spectra Pro to me. Here are some Google images of that camera here. Here is a bit of historical information on the Spectra and Spectra Pro: http://camerapedia.wikia.com/wiki/Polaroid_Spectra#Spectra_Pro


3

A piece of photo paper X x Y millimeters with uneven margins cannot be trademarked. Do not mention the word "Polaroid" in print anywhere, do not use the company logo, and don't bother printing the black square on the back of the picture and you'll be fine.


3

Appears to me that the rollers that crush the developer pod and distribute the developer as the film is being ejected are either misaligned or the film pack isn't seated properly. Pull the pack and make sure all of the rollers are moving freely and that there isn't any crud on them or in the film path...


2

Looking at an eBay auction description, your Kako 720sd specs out with a guide number of 28-40m (I'm assuming that's across the zoom range of 28-85mm), so chances are that this is a pretty decently-powered speedlight (e.g., in the neighborhood of 30m when zoomed to 35mm), in the range of most of the hotshoe flashes you're going to find. Going to a new ...


2

The Yashica Mats that came up in a quick Google image search appear to have a PC sync port just to the right of the view finder lens. If yours does, then it's as easy as attaching the flash, setting the shutter speed to X (or slower) and firing away. The Polaroid has a flashbar slot, which can be converted to pc sync like this. i wouldn't attempt this ...


2

I honestly don't think you have much of a choice in this arena. Probably the only camera that's going to fit the "instant photo"/polaroid bit of that that you can easily obtain new for a lower-cost is going to be a Fuji Instax Mini camera--and the prints made are tiny--roughly business-card size. The problem, budget-wise, is going to be the film, and the ...


2

Not sure what you mean by "did anything". The only thing the battery does is provide power to the meter/shutter circuit during exposure. Have you tried putting film in one of them, pulling the black card, cocking the shutter, and firing off a shot yet?


2

The traditional method would be to vignette the enlarger during printing. Since dark becomes light in that process, the result is a white border in the print. You can adjust the hardness or softness of this border by varying distance (or by moving it during the process, as one might for dodging). An article on this from Shutterbug mentions creating dark ...


2

Your question seems to be based upon an assumption that your camera has a focal plane shutter. The Polaroid 195 does not have a focal plane shutter. It has a leaf shutter in the lens. The considerations for sync speed when using a camera with a leaf shutter are different than when using a camera with a focal plane shutter. Generally leaf shutters can sync ...


2

Although Polaroid did produce (or remarket) a lot of 135 film (35mm) that used the C-41 process, at first glance this film does not look like an example of such. The edge codes on Polaroid C-41 135 film listed here were HD2 100, HD2 200, and HD2 400 for ASA 100, 200, and 400 film, respectively. This film shows an edge code of OF1 200-2 and an emulsion ...


2

I can't find anything on long-term archival properties of Instax film, either, but this phoblographer article on current instant film and cameras mentions that the B&W Instax will turn sepia (but also states the prints don't fade), so I would assume that the B&W version isn't any more archival than the color. Polaroids are known to fade. Instant ...


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