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The first photographic images printed in newspapers were actually wood engravings meticulously hand-copied from a photograph printed in the normal way. By the 1890s, however, prints were made in essentially the same way they are today: through halftoning — printing different tones as patterns of small dots varied in size and spacing. By the 1929s, this ...


16

Strange question... You don't want to crop, you don't want borders, you don't want to stretch the image...but you want to somehow put one rectangle into another rectangle of a different aspect ratio. Those are the only options. What other options could there be? It's like putting a round peg in a square hole. Well, a rectangular peg in a rectangular hole. ...


15

OK... I used to run a print shop so i think i qualify to answer this. Any print shop that can print 36x20 inhouse will be using a large format inkjet printer, id say Epson, HP or Canon. Assuming the printer is reasonably new (IE < 4 years) it will almost definitely use good inks - in Epson's case UltraChrome. IF the print shop uses a constant feed ink ...


15

Yes. And it usually depends how much you are paying. The more you pay per print, the more likely there will be a human factor. The big processors(wallmart etc) are unlikely to have the time or skill to go over files before print, its usually a plug-n-go system. I used to run a print shop - and I specialised in 2 things, Bulk prints, and high end art / ...


15

3840 x 2160 px means an aspect ratio of 16:9 - it is the reduced fraction of the pixel values: 3840:2160 -> (:20) -> 192:108 -> (:6) -> 32:18 -> (:2) -> 16:9 Since your images have an aspect ratio of 16:9 and 6" x 4" prints have an aspect ratio of 3:2, something will have to give: Either you live with the white space, or something needs ...


13

I have found the free waifu2x very good for upsizing images. You can try an online demo. It uses "Deep Convolutional Neural Networks" to predict what the missing image data should be. It works better for line art, but is definitely acceptable for photos.


11

It's not the size; it's the shape. Specifically, it's the aspect ratio. That's the relative "squareness" of a photo format. For various historical reasons, there are a lot of different ones, and, as you've noticed, they don't line up. See What historic reasons are there for common aspect ratios? if you're interested in exactly why we ended up in this ...


11

I was apprenticed to a photoengraving company in 1946. We used the Colodion or Wet plate process to make halftone negatives and a glass cross line screen. Newspapers used a coarse screen with 55 to 75 lines per inch. Magazines used from 100 lpi to 150 lpi depending paper and press used by the printer. The glass plates were hand coated with iodised colodion ...


10

The answer to this depends on the viewing distance. The usual rule of 300 PPI works well for close-up viewing, but even that isn't a hard-and-fast rule. What's more important is Pixels-Per-Degree (PPD), which is more representative of our eye's ability to resolve detail, and is dependent on a specific/typical viewing distance. Apple's Retina displays (...


10

Image resolution/pixel dimensions are the attributes you should probably be looking for. To find out what numbers you should specify in your requirements, you'll need to decide on the maximum size that you'll want to print an image from the archive, then from that you can derive the minimum resolution that images in the archive should have. For example, if ...


9

I have seen this before when printing on the wrong side of the paper. Photo paper has a specific side that it needs to be printed on to keep the ink from spreading as only one side is usually prepared for printing. It is possible, however, to get double-sided photo paper. If you are using matte paper, the whiter side will usually be the printing side, and ...


9

Lab employee here. I can't speak for all labs but here's how it works at mine (note that we do both photographic and press printing as well as a few other methods). It all depends on the type of equipment that is going to be printing your product. Traditionally photographic prints are done on a minilab or equivalent piece of equipment which prints in RGB. ...


8

I find that the Wikipedia article on Photogravure gives a good detailed overview of the subject. An easier to follow and shorter version can be found in this description of the process. Here's the summary of the technique: Contact-print a positive onto a layer of gelatine sensitized in potassium dichromate. This hardens the exposed parts of the gelatine. ...


8

TLDR: Choose a print shop that provides ICC profiles. Soft proofing is an important step for optimal results. If a shop doesn't share its profiles there are two reasons that come to my mind: lack of knowledge (very bad), or different printer types for the same printing product, meaning multiple orders could give different results even with the same ...


8

When I got the print back it was so dark as to be unsellable. Rather disappointed I contacted the printers and they said I should have used an ND filter. An ND (neutral density) filter would have made your image even darker, so it's hard to see how that would've solved your problem. Perhaps they meant a graduated ND filter, which could reduce the brightness ...


8

Yes, PNG is theoretically better than JPEG in preserving the ultimate image quality, but in practice this is the kind of exactness we don't really see, especially in print, where the physical properties of the paper and ink technology limits what can be achieved. For convenience, just stick with the universally accepted JPEG and be happy with smaller file ...


7

True contact sheets were made with the film in contact with the paper, so the images were exactly the size of the negative. With digital you can choose whatever size you want. If you are using it to select images, then it depends on how similar the images are. If they are very similar and you print them small, it's going to be hard to choose which ones ...


7

First, one need not spend $10,000 on a printer to get a wide gamut. To be specific, to PRINT wide gamut, you don't need to spend a lot of money. There is often an implicit association between managing color and printing wide gamut, however the two are actually separate activities. These days, the actual process of managing color is automated by ICM, which ...


7

This turns out to have a simple, non-technical, amusing answer: I was loading the paper upside down. The glossy side should be face down, but I'd loaded it face up. Once I fixed that, it started working.


7

Since they don't print very frequently, they often have the ink-drying-up problem that leads to clogs/poor print quality, which means more maintenance routines that use up even more ink and cost them a lot of money in the long run. So I'm planning on getting them a new printer for Christmas. Given this, I'd suggest a gift card to an online printing service. ...


7

The Canon EOS 5D Mark III has a resolution of 5760 x 3840 pixels, or 22.1 MP. It has a 3:2 (1.5:1) aspect ratio. A2 sized paper is 16.5 x 23.4 inches (420 x 594 mm). It has a 1.414:1 aspect ratio. This means we must either: Leave blank spaces at the top and bottom of the paper to use the full image width on the width of the A2 paper. This would leave us ...


6

You're printing on the wrong side of the paper... High quality photo printer paper is usually single sided (unless specifically labeled otherwise). The two sides will often be visibly different and the 'wrong' side will often be marked with a manufacturer's watermark. The 'right' side has a coating that is highly absorbent in order to pull the ink into the ...


6

Print is a very different medium than a computer screen. Within the scope of print, you are also very likely to find that different paper types and inks reproduce the same photo in very, very different ways. To print a photo such that it appears how you want it to appear requires calibrating your devices, and can take a bit of experimentation to figure out ...


6

Every digital image has a specific size: the width and height in pixels. The amount of information depends on that. In digital image files, the number of pixels per inch is just a hint. It indicates a proportion that should be used for calculating the actual size of the image when printed. If you have an image of 1000x1000 pixels and you print it at 100ppi,...


6

In this context, it generally refers to printers that can accept sublimation inks (for heat transfers to tee shirts, etc) rather than to dye-sublimation printing.


6

It should neither use more, nor less. Ultimately, any image you print is going to be rasterized at the selected DPI setting in the printer driver. Most printers have a native maximum, such as 2880x1440 on an Epson, or 2400x1200 on a Canon. That is the DOTS Per Inch, which literally refers to the individual ink droplets laid down on the page. You could print ...


6

Imposing a minimum DPI value is meaningless as images do not have any intrinsic physical dimension. A better approach is to work out the maximum size you want to guarantee to be able to print, work out the image size in pixels necessary to achieve 300 PPI at this size, and then impose a minimum on the image dimensions in pixels.


6

Hope this helps - Asked my Canon Rep as I was also interested and this is what he sent me; The ICC profiles installed for your printer and Canon photo paper appear as follows. CANON - PRINTER MODEL < PAPER TYPE> PRINT QUALITY (For example: Canon Pro9000 PR1) (1) Printer model name (2) Media type Each letter pair represents its respective Media ...


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