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The first photographic images printed in newspapers were actually wood engravings meticulously hand-copied from a photograph printed in the normal way. By the 1890s, however, prints were made in essentially the same way they are today: through halftoning — printing different tones as patterns of small dots varied in size and spacing. By the 1929s, this ...


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Fine art paper is usually made using 100% cotton rag content, is most often acid-free and therefore is suitable for archival purposes since it addresses the problem of preserving documents for long periods (see "How Long Will Your Photo Prints Last?" at PhotoShelter Blog for example). It qualifies as matte paper, thought it certainly has a texture, a look ...


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If you've tried enlarging in Photoshop, the first thing is to experiment with the resampling algorithm (photoshop suggests bicubic smoother as the best for enlarging, but I have found it to be image dependent (if you have an image with a lot of edges vs a portrait or landscape). Rather than smoothing, blurring I would suggest using a denoise program next, ...


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The straightforward answer to your question is very simple arithmetic: 32×300 = 9600 and 18×300 = 5400, so 32 inches by 18 inches at 300 dots per inch is 9600 by 5400. However, it gets a little more complicated when you consider a more complicated relationship between pixels and colored dots in your output medium. For details on this, take a look at jrista'...


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Color laser printers, especially the big high end office printers, have the color capabilities you need for printing the company logo and the occasional Excel pie chart — but they are truly bad for printing photos. But the good news is that almost any of the current generation of ink jet printers, even the cheap ones, are pretty good at printing photos - ...


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IP-Slicer perl script can create slices which can stuck together into a ball. You can define the number of slices. The following command will create 12 slices, where the sphere circumference is 1500 pixels. sphere-slicer.pl 12 1500 sampleimage.jpg Sample input: Output (12 images):


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Strange question... You don't want to crop, you don't want borders, you don't want to stretch the image...but you want to somehow put one rectangle into another rectangle of a different aspect ratio. Those are the only options. What other options could there be? It's like putting a round peg in a square hole. Well, a rectangular peg in a rectangular hole. ...


15

OK... I used to run a print shop so i think i qualify to answer this. Any print shop that can print 36x20 inhouse will be using a large format inkjet printer, id say Epson, HP or Canon. Assuming the printer is reasonably new (IE < 4 years) it will almost definitely use good inks - in Epson's case UltraChrome. IF the print shop uses a constant feed ink ...


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Yes. And it usually depends how much you are paying. The more you pay per print, the more likely there will be a human factor. The big processors(wallmart etc) are unlikely to have the time or skill to go over files before print, its usually a plug-n-go system. I used to run a print shop - and I specialised in 2 things, Bulk prints, and high end art / ...


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3840 x 2160 px means an aspect ratio of 16:9 - it is the reduced fraction of the pixel values: 3840:2160 -> (:20) -> 192:108 -> (:6) -> 32:18 -> (:2) -> 16:9 Since your images have an aspect ratio of 16:9 and 6" x 4" prints have an aspect ratio of 3:2, something will have to give: Either you live with the white space, or something needs ...


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I have found the free waifu2x very good for upsizing images. You can try an online demo. It uses "Deep Convolutional Neural Networks" to predict what the missing image data should be. It works better for line art, but is definitely acceptable for photos.


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It's not the size; it's the shape. Specifically, it's the aspect ratio. That's the relative "squareness" of a photo format. For various historical reasons, there are a lot of different ones, and, as you've noticed, they don't line up. See What historic reasons are there for common aspect ratios? if you're interested in exactly why we ended up in this ...


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I was apprenticed to a photoengraving company in 1946. We used the Colodion or Wet plate process to make halftone negatives and a glass cross line screen. Newspapers used a coarse screen with 55 to 75 lines per inch. Magazines used from 100 lpi to 150 lpi depending paper and press used by the printer. The glass plates were hand coated with iodised colodion ...


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Printing a picture seems like it should be easy but there is a lot more involved when it comes to getting predictable colors from what you see on the screen to the print. The first step is calibrating your monitor. This ensures that your monitor is displaying colors correctly. You can purchase a calibrator from companies such as Colorvision (Spyder series) ...


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Image resolution/pixel dimensions are the attributes you should probably be looking for. To find out what numbers you should specify in your requirements, you'll need to decide on the maximum size that you'll want to print an image from the archive, then from that you can derive the minimum resolution that images in the archive should have. For example, if ...


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I have seen this before when printing on the wrong side of the paper. Photo paper has a specific side that it needs to be printed on to keep the ink from spreading as only one side is usually prepared for printing. It is possible, however, to get double-sided photo paper. If you are using matte paper, the whiter side will usually be the printing side, and ...


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Lab employee here. I can't speak for all labs but here's how it works at mine (note that we do both photographic and press printing as well as a few other methods). It all depends on the type of equipment that is going to be printing your product. Traditionally photographic prints are done on a minilab or equivalent piece of equipment which prints in RGB. ...


9

The answer to this depends on the viewing distance. The usual rule of 300 PPI works well for close-up viewing, but even that isn't a hard-and-fast rule. What's more important is Pixels-Per-Degree (PPD), which is more representative of our eye's ability to resolve detail, and is dependent on a specific/typical viewing distance. Apple's Retina displays (...


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I would think that a lab's color-correcting quality is dependent upon the lab and the skill of the technicians. There probably is not a single, globally correct answer here, as every lab will use different equipment and have different people with different levels of skill. That said, when it comes to color correction for print, taking the paper into account ...


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Resolution becomes less of an issue the farther the viewer is from the image. As billboards are meant to be viewed from quite some distance, they are usually printed at a relatively low resolution - sometimes as low as 9dpi! It really depends on how detailed and complex the photo is, but I'm sure the 18 megapixels provided by the 7D will provide more than ...


8

It all depends on the distance you want to view the image from. A billboard(20'x60') might look completely fine with an 10MP image, that is as low as 5dpi. I personally have printed canvas prints from images as low as about 70dpi without issues. They look great. Before I send them off though, I use software to resize them to the desired output. Most if ...


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When it comes to printing large, the native image size out of the camera doesn't mean much. A 60x20 inch print is very large, and print resolution is measured in PPI, or pixels per inch. Even the highest resolution cameras of today, such as 18mp-24mp sensors, do not produce enough native resolution to be printed that large...most top out around 17x20 native. ...


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There are a number of drop ship printers out there. A few include: White House Custom Color MPIX Bay Photo I recommend looking at their web sites to determine if their needs suit your particular ones. Many local professional photographers in my area use these three services. I have used 2 of the 3 myself without issue.


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I find that the Wikipedia article on Photogravure gives a good detailed overview of the subject. An easier to follow and shorter version can be found in this description of the process. Here's the summary of the technique: Contact-print a positive onto a layer of gelatine sensitized in potassium dichromate. This hardens the exposed parts of the gelatine. ...


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TLDR: Choose a print shop that provides ICC profiles. Soft proofing is an important step for optimal results. If a shop doesn't share its profiles there are two reasons that come to my mind: lack of knowledge (very bad), or different printer types for the same printing product, meaning multiple orders could give different results even with the same ...


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When I got the print back it was so dark as to be unsellable. Rather disappointed I contacted the printers and they said I should have used an ND filter. An ND (neutral density) filter would have made your image even darker, so it's hard to see how that would've solved your problem. Perhaps they meant a graduated ND filter, which could reduce the brightness ...


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