80

In 1924, 29 years before Tenzing Norgay and Edmund Hillary summited Mount Everest, George Mallory and Andrew Irvine made an attempt to climb the mountain. They were last seen high on Everest making their final push for the summit. Nobody knows for sure if they made it, because they were never seen alive again. But they carried a camera with them, and it is ...


66

Photo films and papers are made from salts of silver that naturally only darken when exposed to violet or blue light. In the early days of photography, this was all that was available. Therefore these films and papers are able to be handled under any light source that does not radiate blue light. By the way, the violet and blue frequencies of light are the ...


32

In the darkroom, place a piece of the material you will be developing, flat, face up, on the work space. Place a handful of coins on this material. Using a timer, remove a coin every 5 minutes. 12 coins will cover 1 hour. At the end of the time span, develop the film or photo paper. A perfect darkroom will leave no evidence. An unsafe darkroom, reveals ...


25

Contrary to some comments here, a 135 film cartridge is very open to water intrusion. The film slot and both spindle holes are designed only to keep out light. The cartridge filled with water in just a few seconds after it was submerged. If you still have a a professional photo lab, preferably one with a darkroom and someone who knows how to use it, I would ...


24

It is highly unlikely for a format to be lost in a way you describe. All the standard processes were thoroughly documented, and good documentation will keep for longer than unprocessed film. But home processing of some materials - such as mentioned Kodachrome (K-14 process) - is extremely impractical. Because of the iconic status of the process it has been ...


20

Ilford Delta is a pretty common film. I am certain you will be able to find a reputable lab to develop it somewhere around (you do not mention where exactly in Germany are you spending your year). On the other hand, you should not have a problem developing it yourself in a years time. To maximize your chances you should keep it cold - in a fridge, or even ...


20

If you are talking about locating a light leak in a changing bag for loading film into magazines and cameras without a darkroom available… Periodically, to check the condition of your changing bag, put a bright light inside the bag through one of the sleeves. Close up the bag. Sit in the darkroom or a closet with no light for a few minutes to let your eyes ...


18

It is indeed true, that unknown masterpieces can be lost because they are only kept on an undeveloped roll of film, but not likely because it is impossible to develop the film. Exposures on undeveloped films tend to fade much faster than development processes disappearing, so the image is likely gone even if the process is still available. If you happen to ...


18

It looks like the laboratory messed things up: the film you used is a daylight color negative film. Which means that basically, without (extra*) correction, the daylight images should have been ok, and the indoors way too orange. But as it is a negative film, the lab can apply an extra correction for white balance (probably the reason there is no tungsten-...


16

Conventional wisdom says yes, you should use a stop bath. The stop bath is a very weak acid (similar to white (distilled) vinegar) and is used to neutralise the developing agent. This guarantees two things: You can be sure that you won't have any additional development happening after the developer bath. You won't contaminate your fix with developing agent. ...


16

Typically this C-41 35mm film is developed in an automatic film processing machine. Likely your film was developed in in a "roller transport" type machine. These machines transport the film from chemical tank to chemical tank. The film path is over and under a series of plastic rollers. These machines are highly dependent on volume and daily maintenance. If ...


16

The light sensitive goodies that comprise film are the metal, silver, and one or more members of the halogen family of elements (Swedish for salt maker these are -- chlorine, bromine, and iodine). Once a halogen is combined with silver, a light sensitive crystal results. These are coated on film or paper to make photographic film and photographic print paper....


15

it seems a little odd that there is a type of light that doesn't affect film or developing paper etc. There are types of light that don't affect the rods and cones in your retina, too. You can't see infrared or ultraviolet light even though some other animals can. It's the same idea with photographic materials: they vary in their sensitivity to different ...


14

Generally if film gets wet and then dries, the film will stick to itself. Sometimes it can be saved by pre=soaking in water and separated (difficulty). Prognosis is not good. Some labs may attempt -- lots of work. Best of luck.


14

The orange veil to the right of the last image is a common effect of light fogging. In fact, I've seen that many times on the first frame of 35mm when I started exposing without winding enough frames first. The white fog might be a different sort of light leak, perhaps due to the shutter not being completely closed when you advance film and cock the camera....


12

Back in the early 1990s I purchased an antique camera (folding type, similar to a Kodak 1a) that I discovered had film in it. The film could have been in the camera for 20 to 50 years (based on type of camera and the images on the film) and I didn't even have an idea as to what kind of film it was, other than probably B&W. I made some guesses and ...


12

The film is probably fine, but definitely heed rackandboneman's comment about informing a lab about what happened. They may not take your film if it's contaminated. Water is certainly not going to harm film. Detergent probably won't, either. Some detergents contain dyes that could settle on the emulsion or backing and may be harder to remove if the roll ...


11

First, some background: Developer works by turning silver halide crystals on the film base which have been exposed to light into metallic silver. When the film is put into fixer, silver halide (unexposed) is dissolved and any metallic silver (exposed) is left alone. Being an analog process, crystals which have been exposed to more light will react with ...


11

As a veteran of the photofinishing industry, receiving wet film or film that had been wet was not uncommon. Usually rolls in clothing that went through the washing machine and/or boat or swimming pool accidents. We would soak them for about 8 hours in plain water from the sink and then attempt to unroll in the darkroom. Our success rate was usually good. ...


11

When we develop film, we must take care that the film is properly wound on the developing spool. This is an example of improper loading of the spool. On the reel, the film is coiled so that it can be process using only a small light-tight tank. Improper windings allow the film to touch. Film in close contact will stick together. Once wet, the gelatin that ...


11

what if it's the store's mistake? With regard to this specific question, you will almost certainly find in the terms & conditions of the film developing service that in the case of error on their part, they hold themselves only liable to replacement of your film with a new, unexposed roll. What that means is, if they make a mistake in development and ...


10

A great deal here depends on the developer you're using. In this case, there are three key ingredients. First, is the fact that it's Rodinal. Rodinal is a one-use developer, meaning that you use it once, and then throw it away, because the chemicals get "used up' in the course of developing one batch of film. Second is the high dilution, to keep the amount ...


10

Film works by changing when exposed to light. If you have exposed the film to light, then any information it captured will be lost as the film will have been completely over-exposed and washed out. If you did it in complete darkness or, if it's orthochromatic, limited spectrum of light to which the film isn't sensitive (like the red lights in a dark room) ...


10

Last I checked Germany was rather up there in the photography world. But anyway, I would be more concerned about carrying undeveloped film back through air travel. X-rays and film do not mix. You can put them in a metal box, but you would need to pass that for inspection to the security folks to not go through the X-ray machines. While storing it, you ...


9

You could try a clearing test. Once you've mixed your mystery powder with water place a small amount in a graduate or glass and then snip a bit of the leader off of a roll of film. If it clears in the solution, then you have fixer. If the film remains opaque then it is probably something else. Your smell test would work as well, btw. Good luck.


9

If the scratches are perfectly parallel with edges of the film, they may be caused by a grain of dirt in the camera or in the film cassette. If the scratches are not perfectly parallel with the film edges, they were most likely made during the processing or after. Scratches in wet emulsion look differently than scratches in dry emulsion. You could try to ...


9

Roll film of this size and type is suppled on a spool. The film is wound on a spool and protected from light exposure by an opaque paper over-rap call a backing paper. The roll, film and backing is sealed with an adhesive label. In this case, the adhesive label gives the patent date. This roll is loaded in the camera. Using a winding knob, the roll is ...


9

I don't have a complete solution, mostly because I don't think you need one. I also don't think your biggest issue is going to be either of the two you've mentioned. To control chem temps, get a instant read thermometer and large thermos. Fill it most of the way with cold water and then add warm water off your stove until you hit your temps. Since you're ...


9

The image captured on photographic film is called a latent image. Translated, this means an image invisible unless somehow treated to cause a visible image to appear. The latent image is best when the treatment (developing process) occurs soon after exposure. As time passes the latent image weakens. This decline is due to chemical changes and outside factors....


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