12

You definitely have to change the design of the camera. This HowStuffWorks page explains how instant film develops well enough. Essentially, the film cassette contains rollers that roll out the developer to begin developing your film. Until this happens, the film is still light sensitive. This is why the cassette begins with a plastic, light blocking layer ...


5

There are the old Polaroids, of course. But in recent times Polaroid also started selling the "zero-ink" line of printers and integrated camera/printers, and these are different than the older models. These have an all-digital workflow, the colors in the paper are activated not chemically like the old ones, but thermally (as I understand it). The result is ...


5

The Instax is a camera which uses light-sensitive film to capture photos. The film packs include a cover that prevents light from reaching the film inside while it is being transferred from the package to the camera. Once the pack has been installed and the camera has ejected the cover, the individual sheets of film are exposed, allowing light to reach the ...


4

It would seem to be a standard Polaroid 600 in a colour that this dude on flickr refers to as Party Blue. Indeed searching for Polaroid 600 Party Blue on Google yields many results showing that camera. According to the Polaroid page on the Camerapedia wiki it belongs to the Polaroid 600 One Step Flash (Close Up) family and it is indeed known under the ...


4

but I'm wondering if I will see either a difference in quality if I were to use something like a Lecia Sofort, or one of the (newish?) Fujifilm instax? There's actually quite a bit of difference between instant cameras and those that shoot film. Film, the negative, is designed to be an intermediary process. It's designed knowing full well that someone will ...


4

If you're shooting in daylight I don't think you'd need a flash bar assuming the film pack is still good. The developer 'pods' may be dried out by now and I would also be concerned about the embedded battery in the film pack being dead. BTW, an SX-70 film pack will only work in an SX-70 camera. The older folders used a different film format and technology.


3

Looks like the Fujifilm Wide Instant Camera Instax 200.


3

Based on this article at eHow.com, I would be inclined to say no. I have not found any articles that describe in detail the polaroid development process, however the eHow article seems to be clear in the sense that there is an opacifer (light blocker) in the reagent. When the camera ejects the film, it spreads a reagent, comprised of white pigments, ...


3

With Lomo you are never sure whether artifacts such as this are a bug or a feature. Strong focus on quality control is not a part of the brand - in fact it is the opposite, they take pride in randomness and imperfections of their deliberately low tech products.


3

Appears to me that the rollers that crush the developer pod and distribute the developer as the film is being ejected are either misaligned or the film pack isn't seated properly. Pull the pack and make sure all of the rollers are moving freely and that there isn't any crud on them or in the film path...


3

You can easily convert most any instant camera to a pin-hole camera without damaging the camera in any way. If you do what I tell you, your instant camera will perform exactly as a pin-hole camera, in fact, it will be a pin-hole camera. With a sewing needle, pierce some aluminum foil. Center the hole over the center of the lens. Shape this piece of aluminum ...


3

Summary This effect is called solarization and has been observed since 1840. Photographic emulsions that show solarization do not saturate with increasing exposure, but return to appear unexposed. Silver based photography The light sensitive content of traditional photographic emulsions is formed by grains of crystalline silver halide. Halide means that ...


2

I honestly don't think you have much of a choice in this arena. Probably the only camera that's going to fit the "instant photo"/polaroid bit of that that you can easily obtain new for a lower-cost is going to be a Fuji Instax Mini camera--and the prints made are tiny--roughly business-card size. The problem, budget-wise, is going to be the film, and the ...


2

Looking at an eBay auction description, your Kako 720sd specs out with a guide number of 28-40m (I'm assuming that's across the zoom range of 28-85mm), so chances are that this is a pretty decently-powered speedlight (e.g., in the neighborhood of 30m when zoomed to 35mm), in the range of most of the hotshoe flashes you're going to find. Going to a new ...


1

In the heyday of instant camera, you could buy polarizing filters that clamped over the lens. Today you can experiment holding polarizing sunglasses over the lens or polarizing glasses you took away from a 3D movie. You can buy a polarizing filter and mount it over your camera’s lens with duct tape. In other words, if you use your noodle you can mount one. ...


1

There's nothing physically that prevents creating and using a polarizer filter with an instant camera. It's more a question of practicality vs. cost and the market demand for such an option. There once (40-50 years ago) were some "interesting" gizmos available to enable using filters on some specific instant camera models. This one is a color filter, but I ...


1

I suppose people never used instant cameras professionally, so no one really cared? It was always marketed as "a consumer friendly camera", so you can get the results quickly.. I don't think it was ever about quality or even extensibility. Even high-end instant cameras were used just for previewing the scene, so the professional could then use proper more ...


1

You can't. Once the pack is inserted, it spits out the light guard that keeps the rest of the film from being exposed, so once you open the back of the camera to swap a pack, the rest of the pack that's loaded is toast. This is the nature of a film camera, and there's no way to put the lid/tongue back on the pack. You could also use a changing bag, and ...


1

Fuji makes and sells the Instax line which as you know is commercially available. There is also a group called the Impossible Project which makes film for vintage Polaroid cameras. https://us.impossible-project.com Polaroid as a camera and film manufacturer is around in a different form and still making cameras as well. https://www.dpreview.com/news/...


1

Holga makes a 2.5x tele add-on lens for their K200-NM camera. They also make an adapter + 2.5x tele kit specifically for the Instax Mini 7 (Amazon US link).


1

Fuji Instax Wide is the way to go. I used it at events and also talked to people using it at weddings, exactly for the same purpose you are planning to use it for. Impossible Project film develops very slowly. You also should cover it while developing to get the full color. The only advantage of it is that it has the "classic" polaroid frame size. But ...


1

No instant camera holds more than 10 shots at a time, but reloading is fairly easy. If you want a Polaroid-like image then you have a few choices: You could scout around thrift stores, ebay, etc and try your luck at buying an old Polaroid camera, either a 600, Spectra or SX-70 model and then purchase Impossible Project film. Impossible are the only company ...


1

Doing some research on the web I found that the Fujifilm FP-100C is not compatible with the SX-70. It's made for Land-100 cameras which look like this. What you need is integral film as sold by The Impossible Project. I've experimented with their early batches of colour film and their fade-to-black batch using a Land 1000 camera. The results were not great ...


1

Social trends may play a role here. People seem to have been in love with "mini" for some time, particularly the types who might use the Instax cameras. I think there is also an atmosphere of style around this type of photography, and small seems to be ideal (Polaroid has been hugely popular for decades, and its photos were always fairly small....its an ...


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