9

No, there's no conversion for LCDs — and you wouldn't have anything approaching the resolution you'd want for a print that size anyway using a digital projector. The usual procedure for making alternative process prints from digital files is to print a negative on transparency film. It's the go-to method for cyanotypes, as well as for platinum/palladium and ...


8

I find that the Wikipedia article on Photogravure gives a good detailed overview of the subject. An easier to follow and shorter version can be found in this description of the process. Here's the summary of the technique: Contact-print a positive onto a layer of gelatine sensitized in potassium dichromate. This hardens the exposed parts of the gelatine. ...


7

If you are willing to do it the hard way, you can use standard black-and-white photographic printing paper and do a reversal processing on it. What that means is that you will be making a negative, but then making a direct positive from the negative without an additional imaging exposure (though there will be an additional exposure to light). It will ...


5

The following is probably not entirely accurate, but I will try to highlight what I think the main differences are. Also, keep in mind that most of the names used above are umbrella terms for whole families of processes that might differ significantly within one family. I think photogravure and circuit etching can be seen as somewhat similar with respect to ...


5

Photo paper is ordinary paper coated with light sensitive chemical. These are crystals consisting of silver combined with iodine, or chlorine, or bromine. In their natural state they resemble table salt except the crystal are much smaller. When these crystals are exposed to light, the chemical bonds holding the crystal together weakens. Normally we only ...


4

Cyanotypes are probably the simplest process you can do at home. All that's required are a UV light, decent paper, ferric ammonium citrate, potassium ferricyanide, a photographic negative shot on film (or something similar printed digitally on a transparent medium), and some water. The UV light is necessary because cyanotypes are not very sensitive to ...


3

Will the pixels be visible ? Will the thickness of the screen glass prevent the image from being in focus ? Some resin-based 3D printers work on a similar principle: an LCD monitor mounted under the transparent bottom of a tank holding light-sensitive resin exposes the resin and causes it to solidify. There's no doubt that you could make a contact print by ...


2

Esten is right. As I'm developing film at home I noticed, that for example the chemistry changes color during development of the Agfaphoto Precisia CT 100 to purple. The film base layer itself is also purple after developing. Inverting purple gives green - the typical green color shift of cross processing this film. It looks like the C-41 chemistry is not ...


2

Cross processing (running an E6 film in C41 chemistry) results in different colors based on both the film and the chemistry used to process it. Films are generally known to more-often-than-not shift to one color. Velvia shifts red, Elite Chrome shifts green, etc. But, the intensity of those shifts often depends on the chemistry. The camera has very little to ...


2

You can also use standard black and white paper and then contact print it. It's similar to reversal processing but you don't need more chemicals other than stop and develop, it has the side effect of mirroring the image.


2

The process is reduction of iron Fe(III) to Fe(II), which then forms ferric ferrocyanide (Prussian blue). It is accomplished by UV rays. The UV is the fun part: you can safely work the solution under most indoor lightning (which has no UV) and then expose under sunlight (which has UV). The process works in the near visible UV range = 350 - 400 nm, so you ...


2

My question essentially is: the dyes that are in photographic film are just different chemicals that react to the silver bromide complex during development. Undeveloped film does not contain dyes. It contains couplers. When the film is developed, the couplers react with the developer agent from the developer and dye is created. This is only happening where ...


2

I've done it before and it works. I used a AAXA 720p portable projector on cyanotype paper. The resolution isn't great, but maybe it's good enough for your purposes.


2

As near as I can tell, "tactile photography" is a very, very limited artistic style with only a couple of instances of it being used. In it, a photograph is printed on a raised relief surface so that a blind person could feel the image. What you need to be able to do it depends on how you want to go about it. At a minimum, you would need a method of ...


2

The nearest experience that I have with this idea is this Fuji Instax Printer. I think it's a good stand in as the resolution is alright. Here's an original iPhone image: And here's the Instax version: The increase in warmth and contrast is probably due to the Instax film's properties over the screen. But, there's a visible decrease in sharpness, ...


2

A scanner can not work as a substitute to film development, you still need wet process for that. On the other hand it can work as a substitute to printing and enlarging. When using this hybrid approach (in B&W at least; color is different) you need only a changing bag, a developing tank, a thermometer and a couple of beakers for chemicals. Your whole "...


2

If by scanner you mean an image scanner then no. At least not with conventionally exposed photographic paper (if you radically overexpose silver based papers you will get an image of sorts without development, but radically means many orders of magnitude more exposure than normal). Until you develop the paper (or film) there is no image to scan. In ...


2

The word is fairly generic, and seems like it could easily have been applied separately to a number of different things. For example, I found this from 1969 — "A new electronic method called Chromography re-creates paintings in such exact detail that experts find it difficult to tell the Chromograph from the original." — but I think this booklet from 1871 is ...


1

I've gone through this. It is possible -- the images will be way to soft because of the thickness of the glass. It is also possible to put your phone into an enlarger that can enlarge 6x7 or 4x5 negatives. The phone becomes the light source, generally you have to crank up the brightness. There are straight forward ways to convert your screen to a "...


1

One of the major advantages of alt processes is that you need not be too fussy with your negatives. About anything will do! (do check out the algae cyanotypes from 1840's by Anna Atkins!) Having said that: good starting point are transparencies used for overhead projectors. These were more common before beamers took them over, but the blank transparencies ...


1

How much difference you'll see between using A4 and A5 will depend on a couple of variables you haven't revealed to us: The maximum resolution of your image files in pixels The maximum resolution of your printer in PPI (pixels per inch) If your printer can outresolve your image files at A5, printing larger at A4 won't have a tremendous effect. But if your ...


1

This may depend on your original negative size (what you have to work with), but 35 mm film ought to print A4 OK Printers have resolution limit that they can print. The modes are: 1-bit line-art might be 2400 dpi (optimistic for inkjet ink drops) 8-bit grayscale might be 600 dpi (I'm kinda guessing on grayscale). 24-bit color is commonly about 300 dpi. ...


1

I think short answer is that inkjet printer has resolution: pixels per inch (PPI). So whether you print on A4 or A5, you are limited by the same PPI resolution. Inkjet printers have typically 300-700 PPI, whether digital cameras (say, nikon d600 with 24 megapixels) have about 6000x4000 pixels. This means that your final print resolution is limited by your ...


1

There could be 1001 reasons why your negative turned out the way it did. But assuming: you had used a proven recipe (google Caffenol Cookbook) and you have done your development properly (too many tutorials on this if you care to google), then my best guess would be that somehow your negative had been exposed to light prior to development. Evidence to ...


1

There is nothing "conventional" about cross processing. Cross processing is the deliberate processing of a film in a chemical process for which it was not designed. The most common types of cross processing are : Processing color negative films with the E6 process Processing color reversal films with the C41 process Processing color negative film in E6 ...


1

I know this is an old question but I've been experimenting with this. Projectors WILL expose cyanotype paper - I've been using 'nature print' paper. With an additional lens to get the focusing distance down (an old photographic enlarger lens and also a cheap a4 plastic fresnel - they turn out to have the same focal length) I can get a good image on an A6 ...


1

Picture Perfect 2400-A Juan Tabo Blvd NE Albuquerque, NM (505) 299-9594 120/220 & 35mm color and black & white film processing Film and Transparency Scanning (any size) Bulk Scanning Digital film restoration See the website for more services and mail-order instructions: www.pixperf.net


1

BWC Photo Imaging (4930 Maple Ave, Dallas, Texas) Pretty much everything, including black and white and E6 4x5, 120, and 8x10. Great place.


1

Peak Imaging International - United Kingdom E6, C41 and B&W from 35mm, 120 roll film, 5x4 and 10x8 Mailing Address Peak Imaging FREEPOST RLSY-YZJX-SLXC Sheffield S20 3PP Phone +44 114 224 3207


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