Hot answers tagged

22

Fun idea. That could be called hyperlapse. If you use a specific memory card for that project, you can always switch from viewing the first photo of the project to live view. Another option is that you built a box with a grid or something and put it in front of your camera, like the old matte paint technique used in cinema. Instead of having a paint of a ...


11

The 50mm 1.8G is a great lens. But there isn't going to be a huge difference in image quality using any of the 35mm or 50mm primes. I don't think anyone but you can really answer which one is more suitable for you. There may be some situations where you can only get so close, or so far, to frame your shot, and one focal length or the other might limit you ...


11

The standard answer most time this is asked is don't assume everything was done for a reason, the camera may have already been set to ISO 800 and the photographer might not have had time to change it. However, this image looks like bright daylight and so ISO 800 seems way off, but in this case the image brightness is a bit misleading, 1/500s f/2.8 ISO 800 ...


10

Yes, it's coming in through the top of the partially opened door to the left.


9

I can think of several ways you could use it... backdrop: If the creative directory wants two looks with the same model in the same clothes, shooting both at the same time could save some time. Just because you're on a beach doesn't mean that every shot has to include the beach. lighting modifier: Shooting with the screen out of view but close to the model ...


9

Just take each shot so that it looks roughly right but with a wider lens/further away. Then match all images in post processing by cropping. This is a lot simpler than matching the images in camera. At least in terms of positioning the subject within the frame. Considering the pose itself I would not strive for a perfect match. If something looks too good, ...


8

Maybe to avoid some blur on the dog, the woman or her clothes due to wind for example. I guess any blur on the trees wouldn't be noticeable with this DoF. The relatively high ISO allowed for a much faster shutter speed, which makes everything in the picture a bit more "frozen".


8

I used to think the same way, but then I realised how slow ~1/100s shutter really is. In my work as a machine vision engineer I am used to thinking of the shutter as milliseconds, rather than as fractions and for dynamic subjects (relating to its speed) general walking speed has to be faster than 10ms (1/100!), so with "fast" subjects you need only a few ...


7

Back in the 35mm days, the 50mm was the default lens focal length. It was believed that it allows for most shooting styles with some compromise. That assumption was based under the dominant aesthetic of the time (60's and 70's IIRC). In the 80's, consumer cameras (such as the Olympus Trip) came equipped with a 35mm lens. This made it easier to use them in ...


7

If anyone is interested, my colleague and I have developed a free tool for computing the actual sunrise and sunset times for any location worldwide, accounting for terrain. The image in the example is for Chamonix in France. I'm a photographer myself, and that was one of the reasons why we made this. Very useful when going on a shoot. Just go to suncurves....


7

I realise that I could measure the distance in each shot, and have a point on her body centered within the view finder. But what about possible elevation changes changing the angle? A quick way to get close is to decide on the pose you want to use and do the first shot at home. Make a print and keep it in your camera bag so that you can refer to it whenever ...


6

I think you'll be best off with the 24-70mm zoom. You're going to want a smaller aperture than f/1.8 anyway -- at 10 feet, the 85mm set to f/1.8 will give you only a few inches of depth of field. Your example images have a lot more DOF than that. Using the zoom will give you a lot more flexibility with respect to focal length, and also let you change focal ...


5

Compete with sunlight? Sure, easily, especially in shade. My 600EX-RT through a small soft box is still sufficient to compete with sunlight and give primary lighting from the flash if I want it to. The key is to a) be close enough and b) shoot fast enough. A flash is not sustained light, it is very intense light for a very short time. The longer your ...


5

When the sun is directly overhead and behind you there are no shadows. Such light turns a 3D landscape into 2D cardboard cutouts - it is the shadows what gives a landscape a feeling of depth. Where the sun should be depends on the kind of photography you do. Photographers shooting color like the twilight hours (late evening and early morning). Shadows are ...


5

IMHO this is explained by reflections of light which is already a reflection on the waves in the water. You don't see the effect on the other blade because its orientation is different so it doesn't reflect the light from the water towards the camera.


5

The effect could be caused by torsional vibration of the propeller blade. The propeller has a metallic leading edge, which reflects the sunlight especially well. The lower blade which moves towards the camera reflects the light much better that the upper blade that has its shiny leading edge on the far side. The blade on the far side is exposed very ...


4

You have several effects in mountains: When the sun is behind the mountain, your scene is lit only by blue sky, and by reflection of sunlight from peaks. Late in the day there is very little light reflected from peaks, even though the sun may be 1-2 hours from sunset. Your lighting is bright blue sky. This light has less red in it than a similar period ...


4

I moved to Denver from Phoenix, and there is no doubt that the quality of light during the golden hour is greatly affected by the mountains. It varies depending on where in Denver you are and the time of year, but we lose much of the benefit of the setting sun's golden hour here. In the example above, there is a picture of nicely illuminated clouds, which ...


4

In short You really need a tripod. After that, you will have to experiment yourself with exposition time and the lighting (diffuse) in the tent (the longer the exposition, the dimmest the light needs to be) It is easier and cheaper to experiment with light color instead of tent color. There are tons of references (blogs and videos) on how to do that on ...


4

What is the problem if sun is behind me? It is not about boring or not boring. It is about pleasant. 1. Harsh light It is well known that diffuse light is better for portrait photography for example. Sunlight is the harshest light on this planet. Ugly shadows, shiny skin, flat light. 2. Blind your subject Sun behind the photographer means one thing. Direct ...


4

Good indoor settings: Auto. Good outdoor settings: Auto. What camera do you have? Read your camera manual, and maybe start to research here about exposure (see the links posted by mattdm in the comments). You can experiment with exposure settings then, but until that point, there's nothing wrong with using Auto.


4

Given that half the prop is blurred smoothly, I think we can rule out most shutter or strobe effects. The top and bottom halves of the prop are different colors due to the shiny leading edge of the prop. Here is a similar Carbon Cub without the prop spinning, borrowed from the CubCrafters site: From this it can be seen that with the orientation of the plane ...


3

Generally the subject is the focus, but it really depends on your creative vision as to how you balance the background and the subject in frame. How blurry the background should be, how wide the frame should be beyond the subjects and where in the frame the subjects should be are all artistic choices that don't have a "right" answer. Close up shots focus ...


3

When you can afford it, upgrade to the nikon 18-200mm VR. This allows you to get good shots from further away. Crank your iso up enough to keep shutter speeds quick. I have a case that will fit my nikon with that lens attached. both the case and the camera strap are around my neck all the time. I don't always close up the case, but I will drop it in the ...


3

my suggestion.. go for the 50mm first and buy the 35mm later. The 50mm is cheap (compared to other lenses) and offers great image quality. Just remember to be creative with your shots and use the benefits of the prime (low light photography and that awesome bokeh!) to your advantage. In addition, the 50mm is also great for portraits.


3

A 35mm prime lens on a D3200 with an SB-600 should be able to take pictures in the dark. It sounds like the tools you already have aren't being used to their full potential. It should go without saying that you should check to see that the batteries in your flash unit are adequately charged. Without an example or two, and based only on your description, I'm ...


3

Incident Light Meters measure light that is directly hitting the subject as opposed to the on board Camera Metering which is measuring the reflected light. This generally means, light has to be fairly stable or controlled to retain correct exposure long enough when using an incident Light Meter. A good example of using an incident light meter outside in ...


3

The focus on outdoors use and specifically the combination of backpacking and canoeing/kayaking make this a difficult recommendation, I think, if you are focused on learning photography instead of just "taking pictures." For backpacking, I'm not excited about the notion of taking a full-frame DSLR along. Back in the day I carried a film SLR a few times and ...


3

There are a number of Apps available for this Photo.net has an article with a listing of apps The ones that appear to be what you're after are http://www.lighttracapp.com/ or possibly http://photoephemeris.com/ Lighttracapp is a simpler option to do what you're after so I'd start there. Photoephemeris has some more robust features but is also more ...


3

The only thing you need is a fast shutter-speed to freeze the motion. How fast depends on the breeze and magnification but 1/2000s or around that should be good. Magnification is how big the flower appears in the photo. If you are filling the frame with a flower, then movements will be far more perceptible than if your flower is in the corner at one tenth ...


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