Hot answers tagged

18

Edit: I wrote a Gimp script that does the steps below, and another one for Ilmaris answer. Both scripts are available for download on GitHub. The suggested way to go is this one. I’m answering this right here because I have been searching for a solution for quite some time and found a simple and working one. Let’s get to the result right away: Create a ...


10

Making a worthy copy of art work is one of photography’s most challenging tasks. You will find that pleasing the artist is next to impossible. This is because he/she will have both the original and your copy side-by-side. The reason this is arduous is because the photographic process optimizes skin tones and certain so called “memory” colors. Artist tends to ...


8

The method I've used myself is similar to yours, but uses the Resynthesizer plug-in (for GIMP) or Content-Aware Fill (for Photoshop) to reconstruct the gradient: Create a selection that completely covers the drawing. You can do this by hand, or you can use high-pass filtering to compute a selection mask like this: Start by using an edge-detection filter ...


5

This answer describes the fastest reliable approach I know atm, based on the answer by Ilmari Kanoren. It is semi-automatic; the automatic mask does not work for hard images like the one below because there are no edges in some parts of the drawing. This Gimp script automates steps 3 and 4 (note that Resynthesizer is required), so the workflow is just: ...


3

IKEA is a multinational retailer that also happens to be the world's largest furniture seller. Considering that it sells upwards of 28BB/yr, they have considerable buying power and marketplace presence. It is not reasonable to believe that a consumer or even a small business could obtain similar pricing to such a large corporation. For comparison, a popular ...


3

When I printed a big canvas the company said their canvas printer was 150dpi. I had to enlarge my 10Mp image slightly (from 100dpi to 150) and it still looks really good. you will be going from 79dpi to 150 dpi with your image and intended size. What you can do is measure your monitor and view it at a zoom level so it shows the right amount of pixels per ...


2

Canvas prints are often easiest to print when compared with prints to be made on high art or glossy photographic paper. The reason is that the texture of the canvas removes some of the need to show super sharp detail. The detail becomes subsumed into the material texture of the canvas to an extent. The weave coarseness can help the photographer where ...


2

If you refer to canvas as cloth, and paper as a glossy paper, yes. The final resolution a printer can deliver depends a lot of the quality of the material you will be printing on. This is mainly becouse an effect called "dot gain", which is how much a dot of ink (mainly liquid) spreads on the fibers below it. If you have a tiny droplet of 5 (lets say) ...


2

We already have quite a few answers on this topic, so you should do some reading at least here: Is there a general formula for image size vs. print size? What is a suitable image resolution for canvas prints? The short of it is that you should not resize anything on your side. Let the printer do that for you. Send them the largest image you have before you ...


1

Conserving the height/width ratio, you are asking about a 140 x 93.3 cm print. Your image, with a definition of 3530x2353 = 8 MP will yield a DPI of about 64. This isn't enough in my opinion to get a print of good quality. With such a definition, I wouldn't hope for more than 100 x 66 cm. With a standard 150 DPI (to take into account distance of viewing), a ...


1

This all really depends on how you are printing and what you are using. Printing on canvas is a lot like printing on paper; you have to follow it up by knowing what kind you are printing on. Similar to how you will get difference results printing with cheap ink on xerox paper than on a glossy photo paper, canvas prints vary on what you are using. Depending ...


1

This is the photography forum, so I will take a photographic approach. Of course for a perfect white you probably still need some post production tweaks. Instead of using a flash you can try using natural light. Avoid direct sunlight, don't stay too close to the window either, but like 2 meters away from the window. This is to reduce the difference in light ...


1

This is a partial answer. For a 36"x24" poster the 5400 x 3600 px size is OK: You have a 150 ppi file which is good. You can probably go to 200 ppi (7200 x 4800px), but the difference is not very noticeable, even using a magnifier. In my opinion you don't need 300 ppi at all. The main point for those resolutions are the printer resolution and smoothness. ...


1

If the picture is meant to be viewed as a whole, 6mp is enough for every size of the printout. The human eye does not have a better resolution if the viewer is far enough away to see the whole image. However, if you print e.g. a landscape and viewers are expected to look at small details by getting close to the picture, then a higher resolution is required.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible