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23

They do not really go haywire, mostly stop working. There is little chance your cameras would remain operational in that weather for more than a few minutes. There are really two things that happen in extreme cold. Starting at below 0C, most camera batteries start losing their ability to produce current. It is a slow process as the battery cools down. So ...


20

There are two main elements I see in your example images: Contrast These images have relatively low contrast. The brightest whites are nowhere near pure white. They're light grey. The darkest blacks are nowhere near pure black. They're dark grey. You can do this by reducing overall contrast, by lightening up the shadows (also known as reducing the blacks, ...


16

Storing the lens in the refrigerator for a month or even indefinitely at 43° will not harm it in any way. What could potentially damage it is removing it from that environment without taking adequate precautions. Any time you move your camera or lens from a cold environment, such as your refrigerator, to a warmer one you should be sure to place it in a ...


11

I live in Sweden and I own a Canon EOS 450D. So far I've never had any problems with it in temperatures down to -20 °C (apart from a somewhat reduced battery life). I wouldn't really worry about your camera not working at sub zero. Every swede I know uses his/her camera in the winter (as well as their cell phones and other electric toys) and to the best of ...


10

If the ball and socket holding it are made out of two different materials, they may expand and contract at different rates as the temperature changes. I suspect that the collar holding the ball is contracting faster than the ball as the temperature falls, and 'grabbing' the ball, increasing friction. You could check this by putting the ball head in the ...


10

There are two distinct characteristics that most of these images share - colour palette & 'hazy glow'. Let's tackle them separately. I'm always tempted to think that any edit was done as easily as possible rather than as complicatedly as possible... Comparing the first set of 'Ravenclaw' pictures to the 2nd 'cup' image, the only real shared ...


8

A few additional observations–recently finished a video job at -32°C/-26°F in Fairbanks, Alaska. The fluid head tripod froze and was useless. The record button became very stiff, hard to use, and sometimes unresponsive. Watch your breath. It can get in the shot or fog your lens. And of course the camera lens fogged up briefly once it was directly brought ...


7

The short answer is to ditch the batteries. They're not designed for cold weather. The longer answer is a three-step process: First, and most important, check with your camera's manufacturer to make sure the body will continue functioning in the cold if it has a good source of power. You may have to write and ask this specifically, because the published ...


7

The good news is that cameras rarely get damaged by cold, even considerably below their operating limit which is 0C for nearly all DSLRs except some from Pentax. The bad news is that they stop working quickly. How quickly depends on the ambient temperature and particular camera. What fails first is the batter which looses it ability to supply current while ...


7

Have you experimented much with photo-editing as yet? Do you know of that infamous 'histogram' that is often spoken about in tutorials, etc? That look you've described above happens when the darks in the histogram aren't quite touching the end of the graph. Using whichever method of editing you find most comfortable, that's what you'd need to achieve. For ...


6

I don't know Canon cameras, but have done some work at low temperatures. The likely cause of your AF performance is the effect of low temperatures on the battery. The best way of dealing with the problem is: Have a lot of fully charged batteries Use one for only a short period Assume it will lose charge at (at -32o C) at approximately 10-50 times normal ...


6

For sounding rockets, just use an insulated enclosure with the lens sticking out -- flight time is short, and thermal inertia should keep the camera working. A hand-warmer containing iron filings and salt water might keep it warmer, if need be. Since these heaters require oxygen, they'll slow in less-dense atmosphere, where the need is less because of low ...


5

its going to rain and its going to be cold. Everybody can shoot great pictures if the conditions are easy. Making it work no matter what is part of being professional. I think that the effort the photographer has to put into his work grow exponentially the further away the conditions are from ideal. If it rains for them and is cold, be mentally prepared ...


4

I wouldn't be too worried. Many cameras are rated for use in temperatures as low as 0 degrees Celsius and some pro bodies even lower. Lenses tend to be specified in the same temperature range. As for this particular lens I couldn't find the storage and operation temperatures unfortunately. However I own many similar Sigma lenses and live in Sweden where I ...


4

I have tried this myself. Difference to long-term storage of unexposed film is obvious. Controlled purposeful freezing is far from what happens in a garage or open attic during a year of ever-changing weather. Weather is a problem, not the cold temperature alone. In a normal Canadian winter and spring the temperatures go repeatedly below freezing point and ...


4

Nikon rates both of these cameras down to 0C (32° F). In fact, both manuals even warn that the battery many be damaged if used outside of the operating range (although I suspect that over 40C/104° F is really more risky). You can probably push it, especially if you take precautions, but do be prepared for (probably temporary) equipment failure. See How is ...


4

My gut feeling tells me there can't be any considerable difference in the cold weather handling of these two cameras. The battery in D3200 is the same EN-EL14 that was already in D3100, released in August 2010. Nikon D3300 uses a new version of this battery, EN-EL14a, which otherwise is the same but has slightly higher capacity. This has been achieved with ...


4

I live in South America, in Uruguay, where our heat during summer is around 36C up to 42 C (rare but this year we are having a heat wave). I have used my Canon 60D with heat, and left it in my car for a short time, around half an hour, I covered it with some clothing, yeah it sounds stupid, nothing happened to it. What's more dangerous than heat, in our ...


4

Nowadays camera batteries are (almost) invariably LiIon (Lithium Ion). There may be a very few specialised exceptions. LiIon capacity falls as you approach 0 C - it's not that they discharge quickly as such, but that the capacity falls. LiIon is unlikely to suffer permanent damage under charge or discharge down to 5 degrees C. Discharge is safe down to ...


4

It doesn't discharge very quickly. Li-ion and other batteries actually increases the internal resistance and makes it discharge slowly. As for your question, while keeping the battery on low temperatures can decrease capacity for some times. I don't think that it'll permanently damage your pack. You'll just have to recharge it again in "room temperature". ...


4

Check the specs of your camera wrt temperature. If Canon says it'll be fine, bring a couple spare batteries because cold saps battery power. As for the temperature difference between outside and inside, what you need to worry about is condensation on the camera + lens. This will occur whenever a much colder item is moved into a warmer environment. The ...


4

While Steven's answer is a good guess, it turns out lubricants freeze long before metal contracts due to cold. This makes ball-heads with oil or grease not usable beyond a few degrees below 0C / 32F. Grease-free and oilless ball-heads operate easily down to -40C / -40F. At some colder temperature, materials will eventually contract but that will be far ...


4

The hot shoes I am familiar with are designed to accept metal cold shoes. You can tell by looking closely at the shoe on the camera, the contacts will be slightly recessed and only have contact when connecting a device that has contacts meant to push into these recesses. Also, hot shoes should have a protection circuit in them as well. Cameras can get ...


3

I have a RRS TVC-33 and love it, but i do have issues with the leg locks in cold weather. The problem i have is that when your out in cold weather and particularly when there is a light snow my tripod leg locks will freeze and i can no longer move them and am stuck without being able to collapse the leg sections. I also have my older manfrotto 055xprob ...


3

I suspect the answer is simply "it's a cheap ballhead." Or at least, I can tell you that my old Arca-Swiss B1 doesn't have this problem. I often use it at night in the middle of winter and I feel it moves just as easily as in the middle of summer.


3

Based on your reference to mobile phones, I assume technical quality is not as important as just being able to get at least some footage. Here are some tips that seem to work in Finnish winter: Keep the camera or phone inside your jacket, close to your body heat when you are not using it. Waterproof covers provide some insulation because they leave a gap of ...


3

If it shorts the front contacts, there may be damage. Your camera uses the Sony Multi-Interface Shoe (MIS), which has a whole lot more contacts than the hot shoes found on other brands. One pin in particular brings the full, unregulated battery power, with a 1.6A fuse (Pin 17 in the Wikipedia link above). If this pin is shorted to ground (such as the ...


2

The greatest benefit from including silica gel in your camera bag is to keep the inside of the bag dryer than the outside air when stored at room temperatures that tend to be fairly moist for long periods of time. If you bring your cameras in from a cold environment, particularly sub-freezing temperatures and then bag them in a warm, moist environment ...


2

A common reason for why things stop working in the cold is that the material shrinks and puts strains on solder points and/or connectors. The water might additionally have corroded parts of those connectors which makes it more susceptible to this mechanical stress. This is a large "might be"; what exactly is at fault I cannot tell you. And if it is a broken ...


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